#1
I've been learning jazz for a few months now.Can any jazz guitarists recommend some essential jazz guitar albums that i should be listening to?
I particularly like jazz blues but am interested the standards also and the different interpretations of them.
Thanks
2016 Gibson Les Paul Traditional T in Light Burst
'77 Hardtail Strat
Epiphone Sheraton MIK Duncan '59's
MIJ 84/85 Tele
MIM Std Tele
Fender Blues Jnr
Digitech Screamin' Blues
#2
I'm not a jazz guitarist ( I dabble in jazz), but I know a lot - here my suggestions :

1) Charlie Christian - Swing to Bop ( he's the first real jazz guitarist - you absolutely need to learn at least one of his solos - believe me , it will change how you play - he's more accessible than those after but his phrasing is excellent) - Charlie's songs appear on all kinds of compilations so just pick one.

2) Wes Montgomery - Freddie the Freeloader (Wes Montgomery Trio)- learn this solo and you will drastically improve - Wes learnt to play by learning all of Charlie Christians solos by ear - so he's like the next in line and I consider him to be really the reference point for jazz guitar. That one solo has so many great lines that I've used in all kinds of contexts - it's a goldmine. Any album of his is great.

3) Grant Green - Sookie Sookie - this is a funk tune but it's got great phrasing and use of pentatonics, which makes it accessible - Grant Green is a great study for accessible jazz guitar - he has a lot of great blues tunes. Any Grant Green album with some blues tunes will do fine.

4) Lenny Breau - Live at Bourbon Street album- I hate to break it to you, but there is nothing accessible about Lenny, he's insane - he plays the guitar like its a piano and no one has come close since to what he can do. Check out the blues tune Oscar's Blues, which he recorded when he was 21! The Live at Bourbon Street album has a ton of standards that are played pretty straight and it's just amazing.

5) Kurt Rosenwinkel - "The Next Step" - this is like travelling to the future, even today, and it's not accessible to beginners at all, but he's worth mentioning because I consider him to be the most amazing jazz guitarist alive today and that album is a masterpiece in guitar history - he played the whole thing with gibberish tunings and it's a really unique album - he's considered one of the worlds top players today. He does have an album of standards that you may want to check out.


As a general note, the further back in history you go, the more accessible the standards are - if you listen to a standard played by someone today, chances are that it's littered with crazy substitutions and barely recognizable. However, if you listen to a standard recorded in the 30's or 40's, then it's played straight. I strongly encourage you to listen to the oldest version of each standard that has vocals - that is the trick - then you'll know what the song really is supposed to be and you can make more sense of the melodies and it makes remembering them WAY easier.
#3
Quote by reverb66
I'm not a jazz guitarist ( I dabble in jazz), but I know a lot - here my suggestions :

1) Charlie Christian - Swing to Bop ( he's the first real jazz guitarist - you absolutely need to learn at least one of his solos - believe me , it will change how you play - he's more accessible than those after but his phrasing is excellent) - Charlie's songs appear on all kinds of compilations so just pick one.

2) Wes Montgomery - Freddie the Freeloader (Wes Montgomery Trio)- learn this solo and you will drastically improve - Wes learnt to play by learning all of Charlie Christians solos by ear - so he's like the next in line and I consider him to be really the reference point for jazz guitar. That one solo has so many great lines that I've used in all kinds of contexts - it's a goldmine. Any album of his is great.

3) Grant Green - Sookie Sookie - this is a funk tune but it's got great phrasing and use of pentatonics, which makes it accessible - Grant Green is a great study for accessible jazz guitar - he has a lot of great blues tunes. Any Grant Green album with some blues tunes will do fine.

4) Lenny Breau - Live at Bourbon Street album- I hate to break it to you, but there is nothing accessible about Lenny, he's insane - he plays the guitar like its a piano and no one has come close since to what he can do. Check out the blues tune Oscar's Blues, which he recorded when he was 21! The Live at Bourbon Street album has a ton of standards that are played pretty straight and it's just amazing.

5) Kurt Rosenwinkel - "The Next Step" - this is like travelling to the future, even today, and it's not accessible to beginners at all, but he's worth mentioning because I consider him to be the most amazing jazz guitarist alive today and that album is a masterpiece in guitar history - he played the whole thing with gibberish tunings and it's a really unique album - he's considered one of the worlds top players today. He does have an album of standards that you may want to check out.


As a general note, the further back in history you go, the more accessible the standards are - if you listen to a standard played by someone today, chances are that it's littered with crazy substitutions and barely recognizable. However, if you listen to a standard recorded in the 30's or 40's, then it's played straight. I strongly encourage you to listen to the oldest version of each standard that has vocals - that is the trick - then you'll know what the song really is supposed to be and you can make more sense of the melodies and it makes remembering them WAY easier.


Great thanks.
I got Wes and Charlie so far.I also got a Scofield album too.That stuff is weird
2016 Gibson Les Paul Traditional T in Light Burst
'77 Hardtail Strat
Epiphone Sheraton MIK Duncan '59's
MIJ 84/85 Tele
MIM Std Tele
Fender Blues Jnr
Digitech Screamin' Blues
#4
I play jazz along with a whole bunch of other stuff. Jack of all trades and master of... you know.
Reverb66 posted some good stuff. I also appreciate George Benson, Robben Ford, and Joe Pass. Lots of great players out there so dig in and hang on.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis
#5
EyeballPaul check out the album " A Go Go " from Scofield - it's a jazz funk album, probably the best in existence-
#8
jazz today means different things to different people..

check

mike stern
larry carlton
norman brown
lee ritenour
ben monder
larry Coryell
john McLaughlin
al DiMeola
.
all extreamly talented..with unique styles
play well

wolf
#10
I'm not yet a guitar player, but I have a solid interest in jazz works. Lately I've been listening to Emily Remler, found her youtube surfing from Jim Hall, Joe Pass, and others:


I also wander down the Delta Blues trail at times when my mindset sends me that way.