#1
I'm just getting into understanding how to "Mix and Master". I had something written up earlier, but there's so much extra unwanted noise (probably from amp gain feedback? Not entirely sure)

How do I use an EQ and Compressor?
I found them in Garageband, but haven't entirely understood how to use them..
#3
To put it in simple terms:

An EQ allows you to adjust defined bands of frequency of an audio signal to change the tonality. Think of the Bass/Treble settings on computer speakers or a radio. The more bands you have, the more frequencies you can adjust at one time.

With any GOOD EQ you should have a High and Low pass (which allows to to remove frequencies above and below a specific frequency repectively), a number of individual 'bands' frequency control, a 'Q' control, which allows you to widen or narrow the bandwidth of the filtering, and a level control which allows you to control the strength of the effect, either additive (+dB) or subtractive (-dB).

All used in conjunction it will allow you to 'carve' a track to sound better, or to fit into a mix better.

As for compression, this is a much more complex processor as there are (if I recall) about 10 common types of compression:

FET
Optical
Tube/Valve
VCA
Limiting
Harmonic
Multi-Band
Upward
Diode Bridge
Clipping (Distortions)

As to how they all work, it's very, very, hard to list all of them, so I'll give the basics

A compressor reduces the dynamic range of an audio source bu limiting it's highest level peaks (except for upwards compression, which raises the lower volume information without effecting the higher), which in turn allows for a more controlled level to a track.

Most compressors have a Threshold (the level that the compressor will start processing the sound), Attack (how fast the compressor acts on a signal after it's hit the threshold), release (how long after a signal drops below the threshold the compressor stops processing), Ratio (how strong the dynamic reduction process is in a X:1 format), Knee (how drastic the processing happens), and a Make-Up (how much gain is added after compression to allow the signal to remain it's volume in a mix)

With the Ratio it works, as stated, in a X:1 format for most compressors. This means that with a setting of, say, 3:1, the dynamic level leaving the compression circuit is 3 times lower in dBs than it was going into the circuit.

To learn how to use these is not hard, but compression is the single most difficult and impactful processor that a recording engineer or artist has. Compression makes or breaks a recording.

Some reading for you:

http://www.soundonsound.com/techniques/compression-made-easy
http://www.uaudio.com/blog/audio-compression-basics/
https://theproaudiofiles.com/5-different-types-of-compression-and-when-to-use-them/ - not as much of an impact to you as you won't have different types of compressors.

http://www.audio-issues.com/the-ultimate-eq-guide-for-mixing-your-music/
http://subdivizion.com/using-audio-equalizers-in-your-production/



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#4
Quote by Parac
I'm just getting into understanding how to "Mix and Master". I had something written up earlier, but there's so much extra unwanted noise (probably from amp gain feedback? Not entirely sure)

How do I use an EQ and Compressor?
I found them in Garageband, but haven't entirely understood how to use them..
If you are asking if how EQ and Compression could fix that, the answer is they will not. Or rather they are not the traditional, proper solution.