#1
Avoiding a thread hijack.

So, as the village idiot, all other things being equal, OFR vs 1000 vs 1500 vs 2000. I know the specials are considered meh, but after looking at some string change videos, personally, I'm less intimidated and if I had the cash, I'd throw down for something with a Floyd right now for some fun. The only negative that's cropped up is the Floyd Rose Special, but aside from that slighted line, I'm not comprehending how outside of preference the OFR, 1000, 1500, and 2000 are in terms of reliability. I mean, the Agile Interceptors seem to run the 2000's when they use trems.
Guitars:
Squire Bullet Strat, Schecter Damien 6, Washburn WG-587 & RX10
Amp/Effects:
Peavy Vypyr 30, ISP Decimator

Quote by dannyalcatraz
Understood- I waste money on amps*, too.
#2
OFR: Made in Germany. Top quality metals.

X,000 Series: Made in Korea. Top quality metals. Only available as OEM equipment (on a guitar). Typically the 1000 is chrome, 2000 black, 3000 gold, etc.. No difference between the numbers.

Special: Made in Korea. Base plate is "spot hardened" vs hardened steel. Zinc alloy saddles instead of hardened steel. Zinc allow block vs nickel plated brass.
#3
I've got a few really cheap (we won't even call them "inexpensive") guitars that have Floyd-alikes, as well as a bunch that have the 1000-series and OFRs.
I'm really most surprised at the cheapos. Since I generally don't sell off guitars, I've laid in a stock of OFRs to replace whatever wears out, but the inexpensive guitars' (okay, okay) Floyds don't seem to be wearing out. These days I routinely yank the whole bridge out of the guitar on some string changes, and I'm able to give them a pretty thorough going-over at that point.

I'm advancing a theory that 1. The "licensed" versions on cheaper guitars have actually gotten better since the patent ran out because they no longer have to pay license fees and can put the same money into better materials and 2. the volume of current trem manufacturing has resulted in cost benefits as well. You still pay extra for the "Floyd" *brandname* and yet some trems that come off the same (Korean) production line using the same materials and lacking only the brand stamping are identical to the Floyd-branded product. For these non-branded trems, you pay less than half the price of the branded product.
#4
Quote by dspellman
I've got a few really cheap (we won't even call them "inexpensive") guitars that have Floyd-alikes, as well as a bunch that have the 1000-series and OFRs.
I'm really most surprised at the cheapos. Since I generally don't sell off guitars, I've laid in a stock of OFRs to replace whatever wears out, but the inexpensive guitars' (okay, okay) Floyds don't seem to be wearing out. These days I routinely yank the whole bridge out of the guitar on some string changes, and I'm able to give them a pretty thorough going-over at that point.

I'm advancing a theory that 1. The "licensed" versions on cheaper guitars have actually gotten better since the patent ran out because they no longer have to pay license fees and can put the same money into better materials and 2. the volume of current trem manufacturing has resulted in cost benefits as well. You still pay extra for the "Floyd" *brandname* and yet some trems that come off the same (Korean) production line using the same materials and lacking only the brand stamping are identical to the Floyd-branded product. For these non-branded trems, you pay less than half the price of the branded product.


That's my answer. The more I watch on videos about them, whatever mythical voodoo about them vanishes. It's not that bad. I'm mechanically inclined (currently doing a belt change on my wife's van and I've assembled all my own computers) and double-locking trems aren't that complex to me once I became familiar with the nomeclature. I'm more willing to give one a go, because I can see how it operates. I just wasn't sure how everything stood side to side between models. I still see that it's probably not the best thing to recommend a n00b for their first guitar, but after that, seems like its worth the hassle.

Now, how can I get my wife to let me buy an Agile Interceptor....
Guitars:
Squire Bullet Strat, Schecter Damien 6, Washburn WG-587 & RX10
Amp/Effects:
Peavy Vypyr 30, ISP Decimator

Quote by dannyalcatraz
Understood- I waste money on amps*, too.
#5
what guitarkid8 said.

i dunno, dspellman may be right, maybe the cheapos have improved, but i've been burned enough with cheapos in the past that i'm not taking the risk. fwiw, the OFR isn't the only good double-locking trem- gotoh and schaller also make good double locking trems.
Quote by crownegamers
I saw in a couple of pictures that on Bucketheads Les Paul (only some pictures) that his neck pickup is painted in white. Can anyone explain to me why he would do this, and if there are any pros and cons.

Quote by dspellman
The guy wears a KFC Bucket and a white mask during performances, and you're interested in the color of his pickup covers?