#1
I ask because, well, I don't know the difference aha.

I've owned an RG370DX for most of my guitar playing life,



it's what I developed most of my chops on, so it's what I'm most used to, it's strange, I'm not sure wen it was made, I only know when I bought it, 2005, so it could either have a Wizard II or III neck from what I can tell. I just recently bought a RG870QMZ



and the neck feels the same as the 370(different neck entirely though, the 870 has a Wizard Premium, it's a mm thinner at both the 1st and 12th fret).

Anyway, can someone help me clarify which neck finishes these necks have? Satin or Tongue Oiled?

I'm thinking about purchasing a Schecter Blackjack SLS FR S



next year and they come with painted Satin finish necks, I just read that they can feel alot like Gloss finish(which I despise with a passion) after playing them enough, so that worried me a little.

What are your opinions on Satin? Is it true that they start to feel like gloss?
#2
satin finish is a very light finish and really not very slippery. personally i prefer satin finishes especially on maple necks with maple boards. both of my strats have satin finishes on the necks and both are over 20 years old, neither feels slippery or much like a gloss finish.
#3
Quote by monwobobbo
satin finish is a very light finish and really not very slippery. personally i prefer satin finishes especially on maple necks with maple boards. both of my strats have satin finishes on the necks and both are over 20 years old, neither feels slippery or much like a gloss finish.


So, when you say it's not very slippery, do you mean there's a good bit of friction when sliding your thumb up and down and the neck?

That's what I don't like about Gloss. It's like trying to play through mud.
Last edited by jordandeir at Oct 31, 2016,
#4
Quote by jordandeir
So, when you say it's not very slippery, do you mean there's a good bit of friction when sliding your thumb up and down and the neck?

That's what I don't like about Gloss. It's like trying to play through mud.


no not at all there is no real friction when your hands get sweaty. maple fingerboards with glossy finish get real slippery when you play then and yes the necks can cause your hand to stick so I know what you mean. I have a couple of guitars with finished necks but for fast playing I go with satin.
#5
For starters, it's "tung oil," not Tongue Oil. It's obtained by pressing the seed from the nut of the tung tree. Most tung oil finishes actually have no tung oil (as raw tung oil) in them; they're just a drying oil finish like linseed oil or walnut oil. Oil finishes are generally not very durable, nor are they very moisture or dirt resistant. They're very pretty, not particularly glossy (unless you build up a LOT of it) and they're great for closet queen guitars and walnut gun stocks that will rarely be out in weather. Never a first choice for a two-week hunt in Alaska (the gun stocks) or for a gigging guitar. I have two oil finished guitars and while I love the look, one of them is absolutely filthy to the point where I'll have to sand the poor thing down to bare wood and refinish it in order to ever have it looking good again.

Most guitars that have satin-finish necks these days are painted with a polyester matte clearcoat. It's not necessarily thin or light. Matte/satin finishes, like the "eggshell" finish you probably have on the walls of your home, are produced by putting deglossers into the paint. It is NOT gloss paint that hasn't been sanded yet. It's matte all the way through. This stuff allows your neck to feel as if it's bare wood, but you never want a raw wood neck (unless it's something that really doesn't need a finish, like torrified (toasted) maple or a solid rosewood neck (not just fretboard). It's very durable, very moisture resistant, and most of the necks that feel like bare wood are done this way.

What you don't like about gloss finishes is the surface tension they exhibit when new. In essence, your fingerprints (thumbprints/palm prints), when moist, seem to suck themselves to the back of the neck and it feels like you're stuck to the neck. Sound about right? Long-time players know that your neck will develop "micro-scratches" over time, which is why an older guitar, even with a gloss finish, seems to let your hand slide so much more easily than a new one. The very best way to handle a gloss finish is to simply play it in. For a guitarist with no patience, however, the solution is to *gently* add some microscratches with a piece of the GREEN Scotch-Brite Pads (and by "gently" I mean that it might not even be visible):



Do NOT use the grey ones, do NOT sand all the finish off the back of the neck, do NOT use 120 grit sandpaper, and generally try to avoid even 0000 steel wool.
The matte finishes eliminate the whole sticky feeling that you get with fresh new glossy finished necks, so manufacturers have been tossing them on a lot of guitars.
#6
dspellman

I have dry skin, and all the necks I've had with satin finishes have gone gloss after a few hours playing. Are there any that don't?

IIRC, some MM models come with bare wood, but OTOH, the Warmoth warranty is void if the neck doesn't have a hard finish.
#7
Quote by dspellman
For starters, it's "tung oil," not Tongue Oil. It's obtained by pressing the seed from the nut of the tung tree. Most tung oil finishes actually have no tung oil (as raw tung oil) in them; they're just a drying oil finish like linseed oil or walnut oil. Oil finishes are generally not very durable, nor are they very moisture or dirt resistant. They're very pretty, not particularly glossy (unless you build up a LOT of it) and they're great for closet queen guitars and walnut gun stocks that will rarely be out in weather. Never a first choice for a two-week hunt in Alaska (the gun stocks) or for a gigging guitar. I have two oil finished guitars and while I love the look, one of them is absolutely filthy to the point where I'll have to sand the poor thing down to bare wood and refinish it in order to ever have it looking good again.

Most guitars that have satin-finish necks these days are painted with a polyester matte clearcoat. It's not necessarily thin or light. Matte/satin finishes, like the "eggshell" finish you probably have on the walls of your home, are produced by putting deglossers into the paint. It is NOT gloss paint that hasn't been sanded yet. It's matte all the way through. This stuff allows your neck to feel as if it's bare wood, but you never want a raw wood neck (unless it's something that really doesn't need a finish, like torrified (toasted) maple or a solid rosewood neck (not just fretboard). It's very durable, very moisture resistant, and most of the necks that feel like bare wood are done this way.

What you don't like about gloss finishes is the surface tension they exhibit when new. In essence, your fingerprints (thumbprints/palm prints), when moist, seem to suck themselves to the back of the neck and it feels like you're stuck to the neck. Sound about right? Long-time players know that your neck will develop "micro-scratches" over time, which is why an older guitar, even with a gloss finish, seems to let your hand slide so much more easily than a new one. The very best way to handle a gloss finish is to simply play it in. For a guitarist with no patience, however, the solution is to *gently* add some microscratches with a piece of the GREEN Scotch-Brite Pads (and by "gently" I mean that it might not even be visible):



Do NOT use the grey ones, do NOT sand all the finish off the back of the neck, do NOT use 120 grit sandpaper, and generally try to avoid even 0000 steel wool.
The matte finishes eliminate the whole sticky feeling that you get with fresh new glossy finished necks, so manufacturers have been tossing them on a lot of guitars.


Thanks man, very informative response.

I'll stay away from TUNG oiled guitars and stick with Satin.

I had heard that gloss was easily remedied with some steel wool, I just never felt comfortable with the idea of doing anything to modify my guitar necks. Having never done it before, what if I ruin it?

Anyway, changed my opinion on gloss entirely, thanks.
#8
Quote by Tony Done
dspellman

I have dry skin, and all the necks I've had with satin finishes have gone gloss after a few hours playing. Are there any that don't?

IIRC, some MM models come with bare wood, but OTOH, the Warmoth warranty is void if the neck doesn't have a hard finish.


I don't know of any competent manufacturers that produce guitars with truly bare wood (despite marketing copy) *unless* the woods normally don't need a finish (rosewood, ebony, "baked" maple and some oily woods). There's just too much liability. Warmoth has traditionally voided its warranty on oil-finished and bare necks, but may have softened its stance on oil-finished necks now and again.

Music Man necks are sometimes oil-finished (the Axis), sometimes polyester. Which MM models are unfinished?
#9
I own nothing but schecter and Jackson.... big sound for the buck.... doubt you'd be disappointed.... that said.... I've played plenty of Ibanez and they really do play nice, but I can't bring myself to spend the extra money and then still likely need a pickup swap for muy preferences. With the schecter still very good quality build, but if you like the thin neck definitely need the sls.... and unfortunately for some that cuts down selection a bit
#10
dspellman

I'm pretty sure one of the MM guitars my mate had in didn't have any kind of finish, you could see where it had been masked off at the heardstock. - It was maple, and soon got grey and dirty through use, instant relic. Could have been the Albert Lee. This was a while back, it could have changed since then.
#11
Quote by Tony Done
dspellman

I'm pretty sure one of the MM guitars my mate had in didn't have any kind of finish, you could see where it had been masked off at the heardstock. - It was maple, and soon got grey and dirty through use, instant relic. Could have been the Albert Lee. This was a while back, it could have changed since then.


Even if it looks like there's no finish, there is. They do their best to make it look and feel like there's nothing, but without a finish a lot of those necks would be completely fucked after a few good uses in a humid bar.
I'm just a kickin' and a gougin' in the mud and the blood and the beer.
#12
dementiacaptain

Yeah, I just checked, some kind of wax finish. It sure picked up dirt like unfinished wood though.

FWIW, I did one neck with polyester using a fad (cotton wool wrapped in cloth), and got it so thin that three or four coats were almost invisible. I would do that again if I wanted a natural-looking neck that would quickly relic.
#13
Yeah the wax finishes pick up dirt pretty bad. My MM Silhouette has a wax neck and it gets funky if I don't wipe it down after a long session.
I'm just a kickin' and a gougin' in the mud and the blood and the beer.