#1
Just found out today that the wire is exposed on my guitar cable, and I think a few wires were broken(?), though to be honest, they were the kind you get out of an amazon guitar kit.

Trying to get a new electric guitar cable.

But there's so many options on google, I'm not sure how to pick a good cable

If anyone can help me out,
thanks
#2
decide how much you want to spend and go from there. no need to go nuts and get gold plated etc but don't totally cheap out either. Planet Waves are good but there are many options.
#3
Look for livewire. If you can buy them in store, it's easy to take advantage of their lifetime warranty.
Every time one of mine wears out, I go to guitar center and exchange it for a new one.
#4
The first thing I look for when buying professional (truly professional) guitar cables is capacitance. The lower the better. More capacitance means more high-end loss to your tone, in a rough explanation. Here is a chart comparing a lot of raw cabling. The next most important thing is BRAIDED shielding. Spiral shielding can loose its coverage of the core wire over time, braided shielding is much harder to move/break.

I make my own cables so I do not know the premade cable market well, I generally buy BTPA CA-0446 (which is near the top of that list) for guitar and pedalboard>amp cabling, with Switchcraft 285L or 226-0.375 ends. If you feel comfortable making your own cables, that is my suggestion. It is not difficult at all.

If not, this is my next suggestion. CA-0678 is a "miniature" version of the CA-0446, and I use the 0678 as my pedal board patch cables. A very obviously good construction on the cable as well. BTPA.com does also offer premade CA-0446 items and I am sure they could custom make you a cable, not sure on the pricing though.

If none of those options work for you, then I'd just suggest to get something midrange. Nothing like $100 for a cable, but not $5 either.
Last edited by Will Lane at Nov 1, 2016,
#5
Depends on how much you want to spend. But unless you get some really awful guitar cables, you're not going to notice a difference in tone at all outside of placebo. Though it is worth spending some money for something that's durable and has a good strain relief. £20 for a 10-foot cable will get you something that's more than adequate. Heck, a £10 cable the same length will probably be okay. The vast majority of what you pay for with expensive cables are brand names and bottled unicorn farts.

I have a £25 Whirlwind cable lying around that was bought 20 years ago and it still works completely fine despite getting shitkicked. Fact is, there's far more important things to be spending extortionate amounts of money on than cables that claim to be cryogenically treated (how that makes any sense idk) and have gold-plated tips and all that other nonsense.

The funny thing is, the sorts of people willing to spend that kind of money on cables are inspired by guitar players, the vast majority of whom at the time, simply did not care. They only started caring when cable brands started giving them money.
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#6
^ Yeah. I think it's worth getting up to the cheapest "professional" level cables, but there are places who will make you cables like that for about £10 for a ten-footer, so you don't have to spend too much. or ready-made sommer or cordial cables on thomann are a similar price and are also pretty nice.

also if you use a buffer everything that comes downwind of that shouldn't really be affected by the capacitance.
Quote by crownegamers
I saw in a couple of pictures that on Bucketheads Les Paul (only some pictures) that his neck pickup is painted in white. Can anyone explain to me why he would do this, and if there are any pros and cons.

Quote by dspellman
The guy wears a KFC Bucket and a white mask during performances, and you're interested in the color of his pickup covers?

#7
Parac You can always buy one from a music store. I got one last Sunday because I negotiated it into the deal when I was buying a new guitar. It's a PV Series cable made by Peavey and its only $12. You could of course always invest in soldering equipment. It's useful for fixing wires and changing pickups. Solder it and then cover it in electronics shrink wrap (preferably) or regular electrical tape.
#9
It is best not to skimp on your guitar cables - particularly if you are playing gigs or recording. That having been said, you can certainly go overboard. I've had good luck with Mogami Gold for years, but if you are doing serious recording, then you might want to shell out the cash for a Mogami Platinum. They are not designed or needed for live playing, though. As for people who make them for you, well; some are good and some are not, and it can be a real crapshoot if you go that way.

And if you are (a.) hopelessly drunk, (b.) stoned out of your gourd, or (c.) completely and irrevocably insane, you could always go with Alessandro's Instrument Pro 20-foot cable. Only $1,999.95 each. And no, I'm not making that up!

http://www.alessandro-products.com/cables-inst.html
"Drinking is a skill and should be recognized as such!"

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#10
Quote by FatalGear41
(i) As for people who make them for you, well; some are good and some are not, and it can be a real crapshoot if you go that way.

(ii) And if you are (a.) hopelessly drunk, (b.) stoned out of your gourd, or (c.) completely and irrevocably insane, you could always go with Alessandro's Instrument Pro 20-foot cable. Only $1,999.95 each. And no, I'm not making that up!

http://www.alessandro-products.com/cables-inst.html


(i) yeah that's a good point

(ii) lol
Quote by crownegamers
I saw in a couple of pictures that on Bucketheads Les Paul (only some pictures) that his neck pickup is painted in white. Can anyone explain to me why he would do this, and if there are any pros and cons.

Quote by dspellman
The guy wears a KFC Bucket and a white mask during performances, and you're interested in the color of his pickup covers?

#11
You can generally walk into a Guitar Denter and come away with a good cable from a reputable manufacturer by spending $20-30. A bit more will get you a "lifetime warranty," which allows you to walk back into the same Guitar Splinter with your non-working cable and get a replacement as long as the company is still around and Guitar Blunder still handles them.

Ultimately, you'll want to learn to make your own (a trivial pursuit) from bulk bits. I buy Canare cable and Neutrik ends and put together a bunch at a time and toss them in my cable bag. Eventually you'll have more than the one running from your guitar to your amp (pedals, etc.) and the cheapies that you pick up from the fishbowl at the local GC to connect pedals will be your weakest link.
#12
Quote by dspellman
Ultimately, you'll want to learn to make your own (a trivial pursuit) from bulk bits.


+1000

It's much cheaper and the cable is as good as the cable and ends you buy (and your own skill). The lifetime warranty is an actual lifetime warranty for any and all cables that you made, seeing how if you know how to make 'em it doesn't take much more to know how to fix em. The first few I made eventually started having problems because I was using the cheap ends that you crimp the metal tabs around the cable to hold it in place. The ones I made with the Neutrik ends that have a little plastic insert that tightens as you screw the end cap on haven't had a problem yet, and I don't think they ever will.
#13
Quality connectors and good shielded cable is enough.
http://www.guitarcenter.com/Rapco-Horizon/Standard-Guitar-Cable.gc
You won't have to spend that much, this or Livewire will do, Dimarzio if you feel like getting something more "upscale". I love Fatsoflex if you can afford it.
#14
Quote by The4thHorsemen
+1000
The lifetime warranty is an actual lifetime warranty for any and all cables that you made, seeing how if you know how to make 'em it doesn't take much more to know how to fix em.


Good point. The first time you're setting up for a job and your main cable craps out, it's nice to know how to fix it. Or in my case, just dig around in the cable bag for another, and fix the bad one when you get home.
#15
Making and repairing cables with soldering iron is definitely a worthwhile skill as you'll never know when it'll cone handy...if you want to diy all your cables is really up to you.

When I did a lot of gigging, I used to buy store brand cable with life time warranty and hold on to the receipts, then exchange the bad cables at the chain location with receipt. Like someone mentioned, Live Wires would work for something like that.