#1
This question is mainly for those who play in a band and can manage to play a song without f***ing up.

I been playing electric guitar for quite a while now and make my own music. When I try to play one of my songs (ANY) I ALWAYS f*ck up like miss a note or 2 or my fingers slide from a powerchord.

So question is: how do you practise to play a single song without f***ing up?

Ive got plenty to share with people but its no use if I always missing notes and chords.
#2
You said it yourself. Practice.
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#3
The best advice I or any guitar player can give you is to practice whatever part your struggling with, you just practice until you perfect it, until it becomes second nature to you.
#4
Practice to a metronome and/or recorded versions of your songs would be my input. It's what I do and while I'm certainly not the greatest player you'll meet, I don't often fumble on my own songs.
#7
Tony Donehaha nice advice. some beers lol. no I usually do quite bad when tipsy. Its kinda both...
#8
T00DEEPBLUEI know. BUT what kinda practise? should I play the same bloody song until I am just sick of it, or make a practise schedule similar techniques to the song(what I do atm)... If you talking about playing a single song until you play it right. how many times is normal to practise a single song ?
#9
I think this might well be a mental factor. Im generally very anxious person. Pretty sure that affects my hands quite a bit/
#10
^ could well be

not sure i could guarantee i would for sure play something without a mistake

plenty of the famous players (unless you're talking about classical) make mistakes too fwiw
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#11
Sounds like you might need to practice playing in front of people, or rather playing on demand. Most people dont notice if you mess up unless you stop and say aww i messed up. Its good to practice playing though the messups. It's easy to get distracted and forget the next line of a song. Not messing up is almost a different skill than learning to play and takes its own kind of training.
#13
I'll go with 3 shots of Jack washed down with a Bud, then pick your nose on stage like you just don't GAF, But that's just me,
#14
thanks for your advice duuudes looks like im not the only one haha. I just gonna finger the frets until I f***ing nailing it .

P.S i dont think anyone answered this question: should I practise parts of the song that I mess up or make a similar exercise and practise it ?
#15
Quote by kelics
thanks for your advice duuudes looks like im not the only one haha. I just gonna finger the frets until I f***ing nailing it .

P.S i dont think anyone answered this question: should I practise parts of the song that I mess up or make a similar exercise and practise it ?

Practice the song. In my opinion you should always practice what you intend to play. I also think that getting used to playing the song from one end to the other will make the whole process feel that much more natural over all, which will help with being on stage.

It's not the most interesting thing in the world, but playing something perfectly on stage is one of the most rewarding things I've ever done, so I'd say it's easily worth it!
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#16
Yup keep practicing the problematic section until you're beyond sick of it. I usually practice hard parts until suddenly I realize I'm zoning/thinking about something completely different while my hands play them automatically - that's when I know I got it. But make sure you're able to "fit" it back into the song again. After practicing a hard section, I tend to pause after nailing it when playing a song, so I have readjust my mind to keep playing the entire song.
#17
Quote by Sayonara6String
Yup keep practicing the problematic section until you're beyond sick of it. I usually practice hard parts until suddenly I realize I'm zoning/thinking about something completely different while my hands play them automatically - that's when I know I got it. But make sure you're able to "fit" it back into the song again. After practicing a hard section, I tend to pause after nailing it when playing a song, so I have readjust my mind to keep playing the entire song.


This is it. Practice only the motions you are fumbling on at first. Then add what comes right before. Then add what comes right after. Then practice the whole section. Then practice the whole piece.
#18
kelics I'm telling your right now it come from a lack of practice in a band context. There are songs you can play perfectly sitting down in your room but it feels totally different to play in the practice room with your band or on stage.

Practice the way you want to play. If you fuck up while playing shows the trick is to play more shows

I would recommend standing in front of a mirror. OR renting a room that has a big mirror and practicing with your band. Trust me it helps.

I've also done practices with my band with the lights completely off. Really hard at first but once you get it down you wont fuck up with lights on ever.
#20
As usual the main thing here is the 3 P's...

Practice

Practice

Practice

I practice the whole song, not worrying about problem sections, I want to get a feel for the song itself. Then I try and go through problem sections, at times just a few notes that give me trouble. Then go back to the whole song.

After about 15 or 20 minutes, I switch to something else entirely, or just doodle for a few minutes, then back to practicing the song again, back and forth between whole song and problem sections.

In my early 20's I practiced in total darkness for 2 years. I strongly recommend it. That lets you develop muscle memory for where the frets are, but at first it seems a lot like learning to play all over again. I also wanted to be able to watch the audience when I was onstage instead of staring at the guitar neck all night.

Then go try to get in on some open mic nights, or sit in with a band whenever you can. If you join a band, I like to get them onstage before they are really ready. One night onstage is worth 2 weeks in the practice room. You screw up once onstage in front of a crowd and you'll probably remember it next time and get it right. I love playing under pressure. I played fill in gigs for a living for 3 years. Meet the band, 30 minutes later we're onstage, and I had no idea what they would play, whether it would be the right tempo, what changes they might make...always had a good time and several bands wanted to hire me full time after one set. One night I even had to transpose the CCR song "Proud Mary" to A instead of the usual D, on the fly. Singer had changed it to A so his voice could handle it...so there I was sweating bullets, trying to figure out what chord I needed next before it happened...I made it but just barely...

Playing under pressure is great, try it any time you can and never pass up a chance to play some guitar with someone who is a better player. You'll learn something every time.
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