#1
So, I play the guitar for a while now but mostly for myself, reading from tabs and i didn't really learn much about doing my own thing. I know a few scales(i know i sound like an incredible pleb, and i am) and i have no idea how to string them together or what to do with them. I have no knowledge of music theory btw. Let's say there's a song in Am. i want to play some tune in an Am aeolian scale. http://gosk.com/img/scales/minor_2.gif I mostly use this fingering for that scale. But seeing as most people don't play melodies strictly on that 3 fret range, i was wondering if someone would explain how to expand, can i go from that first position to let's say his position http://gosk.com/img/scales/minor_3.gif while still staying in the key of Am or what? i have no idea if what i said is even a coherent question but there it is.
#2
The A minor scale (like all minor scales) only has seven different notes in it that repeat over and over again in different octaves and positions.

I would suggest learning about the intervals of the scale.

All minor scales have exactly the same interval structure - W H W W H W W (W = whole step = 2 frets, H = half step = 1 fret). What this means is that for example if we are in A minor, you would start from A and apply the pattern.

Let's do the scale on the A string. Where do we find an A? Well, just play the open string (obviously). Then we go up a whole step = 2 frets.

A|-0-2-

Next we need to go up a half step = 1 fret.

A|-0-2-3-

Then we need to go up a whole step = 2 frets.

A|-0-2-3-5-

OK, you get the point. Here is the scale from A to A an octave above, played on the A string.

A|-0-2-3-5-7-8-10-12

All minor scales follow this pattern. There is a half step between the 2nd and 3rd notes of the scale, and the 5th and 6th notes of the scale, and a whole step between all of the other notes.

How do we figure out all of the different fretboard positions? Well, you could just do this same thing on every string. But of course it's faster to use scale diagrams that you find online/in books and you don't need to figure them out on your own. In the end the positions you would find would be the same as the ones you find online/in books.

The important thing here is understanding where the scale comes from - it's just the same 7 notes repeating over and over again and it has a certain interval structure that gives it the minor sound. The different "box shapes" are just easy ways of playing the scale. You can play the scale on one string only too and it will still sound the same. It's just a lot harder to play that way and that's why there are these box shapes.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#3
Have a look at https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/music_theory_tips/drastically_cut_learning_time_with_intervals.html

Then

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/a_deep_look_at_guitar_shapes.html

May shed some light ...
https://soundcloud.com/jerry-kramskoy-1
#4
Quote by wingman1
So, I play the guitar for a while now but mostly for myself, reading from tabs and i didn't really learn much about doing my own thing. I know a few scales(i know i sound like an incredible pleb, and i am) and i have no idea how to string them together or what to do with them. I have no knowledge of music theory btw. Let's say there's a song in Am. i want to play some tune in an Am aeolian scale. http://gosk.com/img/scales/minor_2.gif I mostly use this fingering for that scale. But seeing as most people don't play melodies strictly on that 3 fret range, i was wondering if someone would explain how to expand, can i go from that first position to let's say his position http://gosk.com/img/scales/minor_3.gif while still staying in the key of Am or what? i have no idea if what i said is even a coherent question but there it is.
Just to answer that specific question, look at the top 2 frets of the first pattern (the frets to the right). Notice that the pattern is the same as the lower 2 frets (on the left) ot the second pattern. That's how they overlap.

So the root marked with the square on 4th string is on 7th fret. Fingers 1-2-3-4 are on frets 7-8-9-10 for that second pattern.

Having said that, I agree with the others, you should really learn some basic scale theory - and also start learning notes on the fretboard. E.g., the two notes marked with squares on those patterns are both A notes. But there are other A notes in those patterns that you should know - namely fret 5 on the 1st string and fret 10 on the 2nd string. And that's just the start!

One thing I suggest is you memorize the A minor scale 5th string pattern MaggaraMarine spelled out.
0 . 2 3 . 5 . 7 8 . 10 . 12
A . B C . D . E F . G  .  A
That's the formula of the natural notes. 1 fret between B-C and E-F, 2 frets between all the others. That's the same all over the fretboard. That means you can work out any note on any fret on any string, because you know the open string notes, and you know that A-BC-D-EF-G-A formula. E,g the pattern on the E string runs:
0 1 . 3 . 5 . 7 8 . 10 . 12
E F . G . A . B C . D  .  E

You could print out a blank fretboard chart from somewhere and start filling in all the notes on every string.

Then NEXT you could plot out some chords! Chords are formed by alternative steps from a scale. So an Am chord is A-C-E. Mark all the A-C-E notes, all over the fretboard. Any place you can get your fingers on them all at the same time, you have an Am chord shape! (Doesn't have to include all 6 strings, but you'd need to mute ones not included.) A C major chord is C-E-G. Now you can find all the possible shapes for a C major chord. Etc. Eventually you'll have all the chords in the key of C major - and all the possible positions for each one (not just the open position cowboy shapes ).

Of course, it doesn't stop there... There are other scales and chords using sharps and flats. But the ABCDEFG note positions are your essential map of the fretboard. The sharps and flats are just the notes in between.
#5
Thanks a bunch guys, I've recently found i have a lot of free time on my hands so i'll look into these things, this is a nice starting point!
#6
You can play a solo or some phrases in a single position.

I've seen a lot of people make the mistake of thinking they have to play a different note, or to play a lot of notes. Your phrase could be any number of notes and a majority of them might even be the same note.

The solo is more about stringing phrases together rather than playing all over the fretboard. Of course you want to get to a point where you are free to play all over the fretboard but that comes with time. You should also be able to play nice phrases contained within a single position.

Try looking into something called "chord tone soloing" . The basic idea is to target hitting a chord tone on the strong beats or on chord changes. Then create phrases that lead into a chord tone right on the strong beat. Practice doing this in a single position. Then practice in another position, then practice in another position. Then practice phrases that move along a single string. Then practice phrases that move along a single string into a fretboard position so that it might start by moving up (or down) a single string and then finish by moving across strings in a single position.

Double stops, and arpeggios are also very useful in making your solos interesting. Again using a mindful approach where you know what it is that you are trying to achieve in your practice is very useful. If you are practicing arpeggios you could just practice playing them up and down but this is about finger mechanics. If you want to practice writing tasteful phrases then you need to practice incorporating arpeggios into a phrase which is a different focus to your practice.

Learning songs is invaluable. Practicing as outlined above is important but learning from the people you admire as musicians will teach you how they use the notes in a musical fashion to create awesome melodies. You will recognize the shapes in the music you are playing and allow you to see how those shapes are used in actual musical examples.
Si