#1
Hi, Looking for some opinions on a solid electric guitar that leans toward a metal sound. The problem im having is finding one in my price range that has a floyd rose whammy bridge under around 500$ or so. It doesnt have to be anything special. The things that are most important to me is it be durable and not fall apart on me easily.

Id prefer mahogany but basswood would also be acceptable.

Ive been looking at a esp ltd m100 fm, Which sounds like it would be ideal for what i want (not looking to gig or anything). Except i dont hear good things about the licensed and special floyd roses.

If i were to get a esp ltd m100fm then upgrade the floyd rose to something like a gotoh or original one would i have a pretty solid guitar for home use?

like i said i dont need any "bells and whistles" or anything. just a solid, dependable, high playability for fast metal stuff one.

other then the ltds ive been looking at schecter and ibanez. any other opinions out there on the ltd m100fm if i upgrade the floyd rose? Or maybe another brand i havent thought of?

Thanks
#2
after doing more research on the esp ltd 100fm I see some people saying theyre great, others saying theyre junk.

I just need something basic, with a floyd rose style bridge, Something that would be a good solid base and will later be modded.

Any suggestions out there?
#3
Somebody is bound to say it so I'll just start with it. Lower end guitars tend to have inferior double locking trems and even a good one is a hassle to begin with in terms of setup related whatever, including changing tunings and gauges. It's something that a lot of people insist on getting, touch once or twice until the novelty wears off, and get annoyed by it. Meanwhile you're limiting what brands and models you are looking at just to get something that you may end up not using.

I'm not saying that you shouldn't get a guitar with one but you should definitely think twice about whether you are really going to make significant enough usage to justify committing yourself to it and I'm sure that others here will echo the same sentiment.
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#4
i understand that learning to setup a floyd takes some time. im not too worried about it. with youtube I can figure it out im sure.

what i'm really looking for is one that i can upgrade the floyd in if it needs to be, and have a solid metalish guitar.

i just dont want to get one and even after upgrading and modding it, it still will give me unacceptable problems.

i already own a cheap epiphone les paul that im very happy with. I'm just looking to get one that will lend itself more to fast playing metal/thrash type music (quicker neck and whammy bar).

Just for home practice for now. Thanks for reply.

Also im up for suggestions on any brand really, as long as it fits my criteria of being a solid metalish guitar after upgrading the floyd and maybe pickups.
#6
You can pick up a majority of the old Jackson Professional line in your price range. Or a use Jackson X series. There really isn't anything any better for your peice range. Most of the old Professional line are worth above and beyond their price points
#7
Quote by guitarguy2222
Also im up for suggestions on any brand really, as long as it fits my criteria of being a solid metalish guitar after upgrading the floyd and maybe pickups.


How much would you expect to spend on upgrading the bridge and the pickups? Why not just spend more and buy a guitar that comes with these features as stock? IIRC there are Schecters with EMGs and a FR Special?
#8
I understand *some* of the the whining about Floyds, but there are some serious misconceptions out there, and I think a lot of it has to do with people who bought guitars that looked cool (with Floyds) and then were a bit afraid to learn how to use them properly. There are no more licensed Floyds and haven't been for several years. This has had the effect of increasing the quality of the ones that are available (no more license fees in the costs) on most guitars. There's also an irrational fear of lower-end Floyds. I have at least one that's still near-perfect (except for the cosmetic wear and tear) operationally and the guitar it's on was new in 1992. I have a new OFR sitting on a shelf that's waiting for it to keel over, but it refuses to do so. I've got five LP-style guitars with Floyds at all levels of original expense that are all doing well. Two are on guitars that had new prices of around $299 (Agile AL2000 Floyd), one is a $399-level guitar (Agile AL3100 Floyd) that seems to have a Floyd off the same Korean line as the brand-name OFRs (same tooling marks) and the other two are actually Schaller-originated OFRs. I've got FRO (the new OFR designation from FR itself) replacements sitting on the shelf waiting for the cheapos to die as well. Truth is, they're working great, and why replace them?

I now have big oversize brass sustain blocks on all of them; I like both the sonic change and the "feel" or inertia difference they provide, especially when it comes to bends and vibrato. IMHO, *this* is more of an upgrade (and cheaper) than simply assuming that you need a Gotoh or Schaller to make a difference in the guitar. YMMV. You're more likely to need to replace a clamp or screw on a locking nut, a screw on a spring claw or a spring itself than you are a major piece on the bridge unit.

And replacing strings seems to be a terror to some. I routinely remove the entire bridge unit from the guitar (it makes putting the strings in the saddles easier), string up all six, and then replace the unit and reattach the springs with a block under the butt of the trem. That gives me a chance to check knife edges, inspect saddles for burrs, and clean it a bit (all those bumpy bits are great sweat and grime collectors), as well as clean the fretboard and buff up the frets if required.
#9
I can understand that it isn't as much of a hassle as some claim, but its use is fairly limited. Like I said: it often is simply a toy that goes largely unused after the novelty wears away and the honeymoon stage is over. So while it may not be a huge hassle, any hassle for something that gets no use is silly. On top of that, you are limiting your choices for guitars big time.
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#11
TS, I'd be looking used. The FR will increase the price of the guitar, so for $500 new you aren't getting a lot for your money. As diabolical mentioned, the M-1000 can be found within budget. There are several offerings from LTD, Schecter, Jackson, and Ibanez (off the top of my head) that can be had on the used.

I'd look at:

LTD 400 - 1000 series guitars
Any Ibanez Prestige (probably 1570 in that range) or possibly Premium/Iron Label guitars
Jackson Professional series
Schecter with the specs you like, not too familiar with those so I'll let someone else chime in with those
I'm just a kickin' and a gougin' in the mud and the blood and the beer.
#12
Looking at your criteria I immediately went to used Jackson X series or Professional series. I have owned several in the past that were great guitars, they had a licensed flloyd rose system and it held up just fine. I eventually got rid of all of them because I really wasn't using the flloyd so went hard tail - easier string changes, tuning changes. Anyway - I think that in the used market at your price point Jackson probably has the best choice of options available. In my local used market I could grab any of a half dozen X or professional used Jacksons for under $500. For LTDs I usually see either entry models (100 series) or the 'professional' (1000 series) guitars but not a lot of the in between models.
#13
Quote by theogonia777
Somebody is bound to say it so I'll just start with it. Lower end guitars tend to have inferior double locking trems and even a good one is a hassle to begin with in terms of setup related whatever, including changing tunings and gauges. It's something that a lot of people insist on getting, touch once or twice until the novelty wears off, and get annoyed by it. Meanwhile you're limiting what brands and models you are looking at just to get something that you may end up not using.

I'm not saying that you shouldn't get a guitar with one but you should definitely think twice about whether you are really going to make significant enough usage to justify committing yourself to it and I'm sure that others here will echo the same sentiment.


Yeah agreed 100%. You make a good point as well in there- you really do have to decide if you need one, because some players genuinely do. I know I'd have been very annoyed had I not had one on my first guitar because a lot of the stuff I wanted to play needed one. That being said, if I were to do it again I'd get a better guitar which had a good floyd rose- as you rightly said, the cheapo ones often are a headache, and even the good ones are more bother than a hardtail or similar (but at least with the good ones you get all the benefits of a floyd as well- rock-solid tuning, crazy whammy tricks etc.. )
Quote by crownegamers
I saw in a couple of pictures that on Bucketheads Les Paul (only some pictures) that his neck pickup is painted in white. Can anyone explain to me why he would do this, and if there are any pros and cons.

Quote by dspellman
The guy wears a KFC Bucket and a white mask during performances, and you're interested in the color of his pickup covers?

#14
Quote by theogonia777
I can understand that it isn't as much of a hassle as some claim, but its use is fairly limited. Like I said: it often is simply a toy that goes largely unused after the novelty wears away and the honeymoon stage is over. So while it may not be a huge hassle, any hassle for something that gets no use is silly. On top of that, you are limiting your choices for guitars big time.


Meh. I have them on Gibsons, Agiles, Carvins, Variaxes, a Samick, and, if it ever gets here, an ESP that ESP is building me. In fact, aside from a few production guitars, there really doesn't seem to be a lot of limits on guitar choices at all. The truth is that whether I wiggle the whammy bar or not, it maintains the guitar in excellent tune every day of its life, so in effect it's always being used. One of the reasons that I really like them on Les Paul style guitars is that the standard headstock makes it problematic to keep in tune, but a Floyd on an LP (while heresy to some) keeps the damned things right on the button.

The Samick is a 1992 model; I'll let you know when the honeymoon is over and the novelty has worn off.
#15
In the price range I feel schecter is the most bang for the buck.... you can get active emgs and fr all for around that price. If you can save a few hundred more you'll start hitting the solid Ibanez and Jackson pro series. If there is something in particular you like, don't sell yourself short, just hold of a bit longer until you can get it, otherwise you'll be disappointed in the end
#16
dspellman makes a good point about solid tuning, especially on LPs. I find locking tuners much easier for similar results if you don't need the trem.
I hate a love/hate relationship with FR tuners.
If I have a guitar tech I'd rock them all the time, but setting them up and breaking strings on s gig is especially nasty.
#18
Quote by dspellman
The Samick is a 1992 model; I'll let you know when the honeymoon is over and the novelty has worn off.


So that means that you are using the whammy bar enough that you couldn't go without it?
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#19
Quote by theogonia777
So that means that you are using the whammy bar enough that you couldn't go without it?


What's the point of the question?
I have, variously, on guitars that I use regularly:

1. Sustainers
2. Active sweepable mids boosts
3. Active treble boosts
4. Varitone-like switching
5. serial/parallel/single coil switching for humbuckers
6. Three pickups
7. Two pickups
8. a single neck pickup
9. a mids rolloff pot
10. alternate tuning knobs (variax electronics)
11. Alternate guitar model knobs (variax)
12. The ability to control the "distance of the mike" from modeled acoustic guitars
13. The ability to control Helix FX parameters using the controls on a Variax guitar
14. Twelve strings on some guitars
15. Buckethead-style kill switches
16. passive sweepable mids cut
17. Hollow bodies
18. Semi-hollow bodies
19. Brass sustain blocks (including on fixed bridges)
20. MIDI stuff
21. Oh yeah, Floyd Rose, Kahler and strat-style trems


*Could* I go without any of the above and still play guitar?
Yeah. But why would that be important to any point that you're trying to make?
I much prefer Floyds on LP-style guitars (for examples) than to not have them. Of the LP-style guitars that I play on a regular basis, four have them.
Both of my most-played Variax guitars (super strat-ish) have them. And they get used.
#20
You're telling me that the novelty of having a tremolo on your guitar hasn't warn off which means surely you must still be making regular use of the tremolo unit.
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#21
theogonia777 happened to me....i don't use Floyd's much, but my first guitar had one and now I can't stand playing without out it and miss being able to grab on to it occasionally to be grabbing one off the fr s model schecters
#22
Btw I don't understand the hooplah about dropping tuning....only takes about ten seconds off time to loosen the locks on the neck and ten to eighteen after running and maybe an extra minute on the fine tuners, and honestly I find it more off a pain to restring through the back of a guitar than the front.... takes 5 seconds to cut the ends off and no time to tighten in, where going from the back in my atx i always get caught up on the high strings.....i also see allot of people mention going out of tune, but I can attest never a problem with my 3 Jackson's.... I'd have to blatantly wrench a string to the point of nearly snapping to knock it out. I can see where purple don't like Floyd's but I think they get an excessively bad rap from some who had bad experiences with them
#23
guitarguy2222 don't want to spam the thread, but you might be interested

Alder with flame maple top
25.5" scale
24 frets
.735" @ 1st, .810" @ 12th
12-16 compound radius
Seymour Duncan JB in the bridge and STK-S1 stacked single coils in middle/neck
Low profile Jackson Floyd Rose
Made in Japan

If you live in the lower 48 states, $375 puts it on your doorstep with a hard shell case. PM if interested.


https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1710441
#24
Quote by dspellman
What's the point of the question?
I have, variously, on guitars that I use regularly:

1. Sustainers
2. Active sweepable mids boosts
3. Active treble boosts
4. Varitone-like switching
5. serial/parallel/single coil switching for humbuckers
6. Three pickups
7. Two pickups
8. a single neck pickup
9. a mids rolloff pot
10. alternate tuning knobs (variax electronics)
11. Alternate guitar model knobs (variax)
12. The ability to control the "distance of the mike" from modeled acoustic guitars
13. The ability to control Helix FX parameters using the controls on a Variax guitar
14. Twelve strings on some guitars
15. Buckethead-style kill switches
16. passive sweepable mids cut
17. Hollow bodies
18. Semi-hollow bodies
19. Brass sustain blocks (including on fixed bridges)
20. MIDI stuff
21. Oh yeah, Floyd Rose, Kahler and strat-style trems


*Could* I go without any of the above and still play guitar?
Yeah. But why would that be important to any point that you're trying to make?
I much prefer Floyds on LP-style guitars (for examples) than to not have them. Of the LP-style guitars that I play on a regular basis, four have them.
Both of my most-played Variax guitars (super strat-ish) have them. And they get used.


I use whatever is available on my guitars as well it's there to be used why limit myself. bars can be cheezy entertainment or another expressive method to add to your arsenal of playing techniques. that's up to you. like any technique it takes practice to learn which is something that many with trems don't really do. I stopped using Floyds after many years and have switched over to standard fender style trems instead. can I get by without a trem sure but why if it's there not use it. I also learned some techniques to get trem like responses on no trem equipped guitars and mix them in regularly when playing. variety is a good thing.
#25
Quote by theogonia777
So that means that you are using the whammy bar enough that you couldn't go without it?


Quote by theogonia777
You're telling me that the novelty of having a tremolo on your guitar hasn't warn off which means surely you must still be making regular use of the tremolo unit.


Are you deliberately being a jerk, or just accident coming across that way? I can't see why you keep asking for clarification when it's quite clear what the post meant.
Yes, there are people who have Floyd Rose bridges and still use them. Which is why they are still made. I prefer an FR bridge to a Fender Strat bridge, but I have two Strats; should I get rid of the guitars because I don't use that feature (the whammy bars)?

guitarguy2222 Have you looked at the Jackson Adrian Smith SDX, or some of the Kramers? They have non-recessed Floyds, which don't let you raise the pitch of notes, but they're easier to use.
#26
I have an ESP LTD mh301 and although the mh1000 is a better guitar for the money used, I still like mine. It has a licensed FR and it never caused me any problems. Now, I don't change string gauge and don't use alternate turnings, therefore, it has been solid since I bought it around 2001. I think the licensed FR guitars generally get trashed on forums but it just depends on how you will use it.

Also, I have seen these guitars (and the mh1000's) in the $300 range, and in good condition.
Last edited by MAChiefs at Nov 8, 2016,
#28
I see someone here mentioned Rondo Music's Agile branded guitars, In which case yes very nice guitars, Only problem you run into with them is availability, As internet sales only and a distributor brand rather than store stocked brand the selection is limited, Basically Rondo orders and receives they're stock 3 times a year from Unsung S Korea if not mistaken and what's on they're site at the time is all they're is till the next order is placed and received, So all the best sellers go fast and the not so popular guitars sit around awhile, So you need to know when the next shipment arrives and get them while the getting is good, 6 string Interceptor Pros and AL 3200's go pretty fast, Right now they're accepting semi custom shop orders and the site looks to be slim pickings, meaning they're ready to place another order, So short of custom ordering one you need to keep an eye on the site and see what becomes available, meaning if you see one you like then you need to jump on it quick, there may have been only 1000 of them built and 3000 people are looking at the same guitar but cant convince mom or they're wife's to let them spend $500 bucks on a guitar, But maybe 1000 can and all of the sudden Poof they're gone, and your waiting another 4 months for the next shipment, Get it? The ESP or Jackson? Go to another Guitar Center and someone's bound to have the same $500 dollar guitar in stock, Made in China of course as the S Korean made guitars tend to hover more around the $1000 mark as compared to an Agile logo to a Jackson logo, Built by the same S Korean factory worker, just a different logo so to say
Last edited by nastytroll at Nov 11, 2016,