#1
Hi everyone! I'm a beginner guitar player and I am getting myself new gear. I was thinking of getting
the Blade Player Texas PTH 3 guitar and Line6 Spider IV 75 amp. What are your thoughts?
#2
Stay away from the spider..... better modelling amps you can get cheap. I for one had a spider III.... they are good until you turn them up high....id recommend a peavey vypr...... also how much does that guitar run.... there are top of the line brands that make guitars for 2-400 that may be built better....i personally never heard of that brand, so don't know
#4
What kind of music do you play..... go to reverb.com they have a assortment of Jackson and Ibanez and other top brands starting for less than that..... and honestly as you get better the build quality would be good enough if you wanted to do little upgrades as you get better it would be worth it. That would be my honest advice. That or if you really wasn't a strat style you'd be better getting a standard Mexican.... new I think 350-400 and can probably get a deal for used in good condition
#6
No problem. We all been there. It just so happened happened I'm looking for a new guitar and seem some deals..... I'm going to try to find a link for the one package deal I seen, amp and all for a good price, to give you an idea.
#8
kramer242 Thank you so much, unfortunately I't isn't available in my country but you really helped me decide
#10
Blade guitars, while not well known in the US, are good. - I bought one in preference to Fenders or Squiers, here in Oz. - I'm not suggesting that Kramer242 is wrong in any way, just that there might be regional biases at play.
#11
Tony Done no biased.... just like I said never heard of them and usually that's not good, but if you know of them you can give better advice
#12
kramer242

They were fairly popular here in Oz for a while, but no-one seems to be importing them at the moment.

One of the features that really made them stand out was the colour. They looked brighter than most on the racks. It might have been because they were using nitro rather than catalysed poly - for example, the candy apple red was stunning.

Their other strong point is their VST active tone control system. It switches between passive, mid boost and bass-treble boost. The amount of active bass, mid and treble is adjusted by trimpots, and the actives are fed by the passive (standard treble cut) tone control, so their is a huge range of tones available, eg hum-style from SCs and vice versa. I liked it enough that I made a similar system in one of my modders - swichable active with B, M, and T controls.
#14
Quote by Tony Done
Blade guitars, while not well known in the US, are good. - I bought one in preference to Fenders or Squiers, here in Oz. - I'm not suggesting that Kramer242 is wrong in any way, just that there might be regional biases at play.



yeah blades are generally well-regarded instruments, at least the higher-end models. i tried some of the mid-range ones about 10 years ago or so and they seemed pretty nice.

as you said yourself, just because you haven't heard of them doesn't mean they're bad (of course it can mean that, just not necessarily).
Quote by crownegamers
I saw in a couple of pictures that on Bucketheads Les Paul (only some pictures) that his neck pickup is painted in white. Can anyone explain to me why he would do this, and if there are any pros and cons.

Quote by dspellman
The guy wears a KFC Bucket and a white mask during performances, and you're interested in the color of his pickup covers?

Last edited by Dave_Mc at Nov 6, 2016,
#15
Dave_Mc yeah probably should've did a quick Google search, but in my quest for good advice my brain farted lol
#16
haha no worries. definitely if you haven't heard of something erring on the side of caution is usually the best approach.
Quote by crownegamers
I saw in a couple of pictures that on Bucketheads Les Paul (only some pictures) that his neck pickup is painted in white. Can anyone explain to me why he would do this, and if there are any pros and cons.

Quote by dspellman
The guy wears a KFC Bucket and a white mask during performances, and you're interested in the color of his pickup covers?

#17
Quote by Tony Done
Blade guitars, while not well known in the US, are good. - I bought one in preference to Fenders or Squiers, here in Oz. - I'm not suggesting that Kramer242 is wrong in any way, just that there might be regional biases at play.



Yes I'd have to agree with just because you haven't heard of them doesn't make them bad, Lots of different brand names made for a lot of different markets around the globe,
Meaning the name on the headstock means squat, Taking it for a few laps and playing with it determines a good guitar from a bad one,
If you look at something like Agile marketed here in the US an Auzzie might not know the brand name but the same guitars can be found under another brand name, and made by the same Asian manufacture, Meaning just the name can influence a certain market,
Kinda like an Auzzie saying hes rooting for his favorite sports team. Unless of course he swings that way or an all female beach volley ball team. In which case he would be coming out of the closet or bragging , means one thing in one place means another somewhere else.
Then there's the flip side of the coin, Brands that are known world wide doesn't make them good guitars, Still made by the same Asian manufactures as the unknown brand names, You really need to play it to determine how good it is,
Anyone heard of First Act? If so how many are aware they also had guitars that were made in the USA by former Gibson custom shop luthiers? or played any of they're S Korean made mid level guitars before assuming all are junk department store guitar shaped objects, Not many I'd be willing to bet, They just look at the logo and assume its junk, Lets just say I've embarrassed more than a few logo whores in my travels,
So yea the logo means nothing, A guitar is what its made of and the quality of craftsmanship involved, nothing more,
#18
As a beginner, I'd just get a cheap low watt amp to learn on. An amp that can be turned down to bedroom levels and still sound ok without cracking up. Forget the high power and all the bells and whistles until you get more experience and have a better idea of what type/size amp you need for your tone and purposes. Keep it simple. Besides, modelling amps aren't that great. The guitar looks awesome but I've never seen or heard of them before.
#19
nastytroll

First Act is an interesting, and IMO instructive example. I think they made a marketing mistake trying to sell their high quality models under the same name and at the same time as the Walmart lines. As you say, the large number of cheapos made folks think that they were all like that.
#20
Quote by Tony Done
nastytroll

First Act is an interesting, and IMO instructive example. I think they made a marketing mistake trying to sell their high quality models under the same name and at the same time as the Walmart lines. As you say, the large number of cheapos made folks think that they were all like that.


I guess so. I wasn't even aware that First Act made anything that was high quality.
#21
hotrodney71 for amp, what would you consider cheap....i know the cheap little fenders had a decent punch at low levels, and sounded better than I expected. I know orange makes a couple small practice amps that got pretty good reviews.... smaller peavey and vox..... even the line 6 spiders are pretty decent at lower volumes, but they fall apart when turned up. As is seen I'm not the most qualified guy in here and was taught quite a bit in here by some knowledgeable guys, but id say checking them out would be a good start
#22
CroJokes I am not a beginner, use a Spider, it works for me. Sounds awesome. Don't listen to the haters.
- Guitar(s) -
S-1 Schecter Diamond Series (Stock)
- Amps/Pedals -
Line 6 Spider IV 30w (Not ashamed) with MKII footswitch
Roland Micro Cube
- Strings -
Ernie Ball Regular 10s
#23
Quote by SlappyHours
CroJokes I am not a beginner, use a Spider, it works for me. Sounds awesome. Don't listen to the haters.


Also, if you do end up getting it, I recommend the FBV Express footswitch for the tuner, fast channel switching, wah, and ability to download and upload your custom tweaks.
- Guitar(s) -
S-1 Schecter Diamond Series (Stock)
- Amps/Pedals -
Line 6 Spider IV 30w (Not ashamed) with MKII footswitch
Roland Micro Cube
- Strings -
Ernie Ball Regular 10s
#24
SlappyHours no major problems with spiders here.... had a spider 3 120 watt and overall it wasn't as bad as many say.... only gripe for me and reason I haven't got another is when I cranked out the tone went to hell.... they are good practice amps and very good for feeling out sounds and experimenting to figure out what you like..... I'm probably going back to line 6 however to try the amplifi 150.
#25
Quote by nastytroll

Anyone heard of First Act? If so how many are aware they also had guitars that were made in the USA by former Gibson custom shop luthiers? or played any of they're S Korean made mid level guitars before assuming all are junk department store guitar shaped objects, Not many I'd be willing to bet, They just look at the logo and assume its junk, Lets just say I've embarrassed more than a few logo whores in my travels,


Yeah I was aware of that. They were blowing out the USA ones here for about £600 several years back. I chickened out because I hadn't tried them.
Quote by crownegamers
I saw in a couple of pictures that on Bucketheads Les Paul (only some pictures) that his neck pickup is painted in white. Can anyone explain to me why he would do this, and if there are any pros and cons.

Quote by dspellman
The guy wears a KFC Bucket and a white mask during performances, and you're interested in the color of his pickup covers?

#26
Quote by Dave_Mc
Yeah I was aware of that. They were blowing out the USA ones here for about £600 several years back. I chickened out because I hadn't tried them.


Funny as that's about what I paid for a FACS Lola LE a few years back, Came out of OZ land, Got it shipped for about another $100, The FACS's have all but dried up now, Not many for sale and when they do pop up they're expensive, have a Sheena and Delia also.
#27
^ Yeah. I think they probably suffered for the reasons Tony said up above... I think Yamaha suffers from that too (though probably not just as much). Obviously a lot of players know the more expensive Yamahas are good, but you hear quite a few writing off all Yamahas because they've tried the absolute cheapest beginner model and didn't like it...
Quote by crownegamers
I saw in a couple of pictures that on Bucketheads Les Paul (only some pictures) that his neck pickup is painted in white. Can anyone explain to me why he would do this, and if there are any pros and cons.

Quote by dspellman
The guy wears a KFC Bucket and a white mask during performances, and you're interested in the color of his pickup covers?

Last edited by Dave_Mc at Nov 8, 2016,
#28
Quote by SlappyHours
Also, if you do end up getting it, I recommend the FBV Express footswitch for the tuner, fast channel switching, wah, and ability to download and upload your custom tweaks.


Ok, I had a Spider III 2X12 and it sounded like poo at any volume other than very low, attempteing to put any volume to it and the tone went very thin and started to break up and sound dirty. I too am not a beginner

Maybe I am a hater because I do hate crappy amps!
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

Come and be with me
Live my twisted dream
Pro devoted pledge
Time for primal concrete sledge

#29
EvilnineExactly why I'd suggest starting out on something small and dirt cheap - anything that makes noise. Amps are even harder to pick than guitars. I know. I have 5 now and only 1 of them that I like. Wait until you have had a chance to learn and maybe even try a few before sinking a lot of cash into 1.
#30
hotrodney71

Dunno, it took me 30 years of intermittent failures to get into electrics through failure to appreciate the importance of the amp. It was a Peavey Classic 30 that finally got me started on them, which I bought for amplifying an acoustic guitar.
#31
Quote by Tony Done
nastytroll

First Act is an interesting, and IMO instructive example. I think they made a marketing mistake trying to sell their high quality models under the same name and at the same time as the Walmart lines. As you say, the large number of cheapos made folks think that they were all like that.


Not sure about marketing mistake, as 5 guys split $65m in profit every year, No over head and outsourced product, Got the name out and let the rest take its course, Made in China and sold at WalMart, Its the American dream brother, Wish I could have done it,
#33
Quote by hotrodney71
I guess so. I wasn't even aware that First Act made anything that was high quality.


Now you are, Doubtful you'll ever see one though, pretty rare. Brain child of Kelly Butler, former Gibson custom shop chief Luthier, Did those one off NASCAR trophies and other one of a kind Gibson's, The CEO at Gibson doesn't like change so Kelly didn't fit in to the mold, So he went his own way, This is where the FACS come from, The rest are just copies Kinda like a Epiphone to Gibson and Squier to Fender thing , The logo is just window dressing, its just a lot easier to spot a FACS from a First Act sold at Walmart, However the guy working at Guitar Center wouldn't know the difference, About as informed as the kid working at WalMart when it comes to guitars
Last edited by nastytroll at Nov 11, 2016,
#34
Quote by Tony Done
nastytroll

I wonder, though, if they would have done even better if they had kept the high end models well-separated from the Walmart ones. IIRC, they looked pretty good.


Cant say Kelly Butler and his crew havent moved to another market, 90% of all FACS were custom ordered , there were only 2000 of each first run limited edition models made, Lola , Delia and Sheena, meaning not custom ordered, And most of those made they're way to the the European market, There were a few second run editions made after 2006 but you can spot them by the change in the logo and they tend to get confused with the Korean made jobs, Not bad guitars and a far cry better than the Chinese made crap they shove down your throat with a respectible logo on it these days, But hey welcome to the 21st century , I would imagine Kelly still builds guitars. Just not for the open market, You'd need conections and some serious cash and cred for him to build you a guitar, Might be quite a waiting list though, Got a cousin that builds Classical guitars, 3 years and $10k bro, Personally I have no use for a cat gut stringed guitar. but there are those that will pay that much and wait that long for such guitars,
#35
nastytroll

Three years and $10K is pretty modest by classical guitar standards. The top makers are around $50K with waiting lists of 10 years or so, eg Greg Smallman. We tend to forget how cheap "popular" guitars are by the standards of concert instruments. The local viola maker, not a big name by any means, was charging $18K about eight years ago.
#36
Tony DoneThat's what I mean. The amp is a tougher decision than which guitar IMO.
#38
Speaking writing off brands, when I had absolutely no clue I wrote of Marshall after playing an mg and hating it.....i didn't know all the deals behind the different models.... years later I happened to play through a different model and it was killer
#39
kramer242I have 2 peavey amps, a behringer and a fender - none of which I like. On the 5th try, I finally found one I love and it's a ...Monoprice! Their 15w tube is a great classic rock amp and the volume goes to 11! lol I took a chance based on reviews and the fact that it was on sale for $188 shipped. The reverb isn't the best but it's cheap and easy to fix that. I'm gonna upgrade the tubes and speaker only because I already have the parts. It sounds really good stock, but hey why not make it even better?