#1
Ok I found a good music source, so looking for advice for hopefully the last time. I narrowed out down to two series of guitars, of two different types. The Ibanez iron series, one with tremolo, and one with fanned frets, both with active emg. The other being the Jackson x series slat 7 with blackouts and Floyd rose and the fanned fret soloist version with emgs. The Jackson's are obviously a bit cheaper, running between 800 and 850, as opposed too the Ibanez at 900- 1000, however the more expensive fanned fret Congress with two guitar cables, a good tuner, a strap, and a guitar stand, adding tip the value. On the Jackson side I'd save on the blackout model, because as soon as I'm done sending it in for a neck sustainer pickup I could sell my good condition atx c7, as I'd have no use for it. I have a tendency to use allot of distortion so all the pickups fit the bill. My biggest concern, is there anything that much better with the Ibanez as opposed to the Jackson. There is allot of knowledgeable people here. All I ask, because I know Ibanez is very poplar here, please try to be unbiased.
#2
In my opinion, the most important factor of coming up with a decision is which features are important to you. Build quality wise, I can't really say a whole lot from experience with these two companies, but besides personal feel of which you enjoy, I can't see there being a drastic difference (other people with more experience with Ibanez/Jackson may chime in and talk about which factories these models are made in, and which have good reputations, but I don't follow these brand enough to know the answers to that).

However, objectively, there are a lot of options within those 4 guitars that you can use to narrow down your choice. Do you want a trem or no? If you're set on a trem that narrows down the choice to two (unless the soloist also has one). Personally, I'll never buy a guitar with a trem again, it was a pain in the ass but some people love them.

Another option to look at is the fanned frets. If you want fanned frets, that also narrows your pool down to 2. Again, personally fanned frets feel super natural to me and I love them, but I only have experience with them on one 8 string.

You can also ask yourself about the pickups. Three of these choices have EMGs so I'm going to assume you don't mind EMGs, but one comes with blackouts. This is another way to narrow down your search.

My conclusion is that you have a lot of options to work with in four choices, and you should look at which options you really want in a guitar. That alone will narrow it down.
#3
GuitarKid61791 what I can say is I like tremolo, but I also like the idea of not feeling like my wrist is breaking after playing for a long period. As for Ibanez vs Jackson quality.... I've played mostly Jackson and schecter over the years, so I know Jackson build quality is decent.... I've played a few Ibanez and remember them feeling good, but the memory is moot clear as it's probably been a dozen years. Emg vs blackout.....i have a guitar with blackouts.... they are excellent and I like them slightly better than the 81 and 85, but the Ibanez has emg I'm not familiar with, and even with the 81 and 85 the difference was slight enough to not be a buying point. Really I want to figure out the reason for Ibanez popularity and if the build and necks are really that much better.
#4
Buy for comfort & ergonomics first. You won't play a guitar if you aren't comfy with it in your hands.

Then consider quality of manufacture. Many construction issues are fixable, but they can be expensive.

And the rest? Features can often then be found in brand mate products, or even added aftermarket.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!


alhaq369
It is very impotent to success a business.
#5
dannyalcatraz yeah no question. And thanks for your replies.... I've been posting allot of things I've been thinking about doing, and this seems to be what I'm going to settle in on, because I figure, even though these guitars are expensive, I can add the sustainer i want for roughly 200 according to sustainac at site, and have my perfect guitar and sell my atx c7 in good shape for 5-600 after the mod is done, making it far more affordable. My issue is I remember liking the Ibanez neck, and i do love the body shape. I also know I love Jackson as I've been playing them since 99 or 2000. I'm hoping to find a very honest comparison because both are beautiful guitars and unfortunately I'm always working and when at home I don't have time to get out to hit the nearest guitar center. The fanned fret Ibanez is intriguing because of the package deal, and it just so happens I need new cables, but they are all amazing and pricesd pretty nice
#6
If it makes it easier the fanned fret are out.... cannot put sustainer into slanted pickup slot
#7
But you CAN use an eBow!

(Which can be used with any electric guitar And requires no drilling, wiring or soldering.)
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!


alhaq369
It is very impotent to success a business.
#9
Just looked re ebow up and while it seems there are many cool things to be done, I think I'd personally do better with the built in sustainer..... as long as the neck action is good I think I'll be fine lol
#10
dannyalcatraz also it sounds like it's more of a pickup swap and fast cheaper due to the sustainac being a form of active pickup.... not worried afoot drilling as I'll either ship it and have them do it or have a professional somewhere who can, do it around here.... suistainac charges between 125 and 165 plus shipping so not too expensive.... apparently on a guitar like therm it's only like a 15 minute job
#11
Quote by kramer242
dannyalcatraz also it sounds like it's more of a pickup swap and fast cheaper due to the sustainac being a form of active pickup.... not worried afoot drilling as I'll either ship it and have them do it or have a professional somewhere who can, do it around here.... suistainac charges between 125 and 165 plus shipping so not too expensive.... apparently on a guitar like therm it's only like a 15 minute job


You also have to pay for the Sustainiac itself.
A Sustainiac isn't a "form of active pickup."
I have Fernandes Sustainers on several guitars.

A sustainer from either manufacturer requires a circuit board between the bridge pickup and the sustainer driver (in the neck position). With the Sustainiac, that circuit board can be tucked into the control cavity *if there's room.* You'll also need a separate 9V battery in addition to the one that's running an active pickup. And then, of course, there are two switches that are generally drilled and installed, and honestly, if you're putting them between the volume and tone controls (which is where Sustainiac usually puts them), you may find they're just getting in the way. One more thing -- Sustainiac only does a very basic installation. That may not be what you want, in several respects.

The Fernandes Sustainer has a rigid circuit board that won't fit in most control cavities. So you need to rout a spot for it.
This is a Gibson Axcess Custom (it's chambered) with the rout done, the Sustainer circuit board loosely set in, and the battery compartment for it already installed. Notice its location, below the Floyd Rose spring cavity.



On the other side of things (I'm using a lighter-colored guitar this time; black switches on a black guitar just don't show up well), you have holes drilled for two switches:



This turns out to be a much better location for the switches; they're essentially available when you need them and out of the way when you don't, and this is where Fernandes recommends you install them.

Why a Battery Box? Because if you're using the Sustainer much, it will burn through batteries, and the flip-open battery boxes are MUCH faster when you need to switch, and no screwdriver is required.

There's also a choice of a 101 board or a 401 board. A 101 board is more like the Sustainiac, a basic sustainer. There are still two switches (one turns the sustainer on and off, the other selects whether you sustain just the original note or fades into an octave harmonic), but that's pretty much it. On a 401 board, the harmonic selector will allow you to sustain the original note, face to an octave harmonic, or do a bit of both (much preferred and offers a lot more control). The 401 board will also allow you to run several of the adjustment pots out to an external pot. I've replaced one of the tone pots on the four-knob guitars with a Sustainer Intensity knob.

Most of the sustainers offer either a single-coil size driver or a full humbucker-size driver. In most installations, the driver simply takes the place of the neck position pickup. When you activate the sustainer, you only get to use the bridge pickup, but if you have the sustainer switched off, you can use the sustainer driver as a passive neck pickup. It's not a very good one. On my guitars, I've got a single-coil sustainer driver sharing the full-humbucker-size pickup ring with a single-coil size humbucker. Sustainiac is NOT going to do that install. Gary Brawer in San Francisco will. Doing it yourself can result in a squealing mess. In any case, when I switch to the neck pickup (with the sustainer off, of course), I have a real pickup there. This is NOT a trivial installation.

One final thing -- an eBow is an excellent tool, but is a completely different animal from a sustainer. If you think of a sustainer more as the kind of reaction your guitar gets to standing next to a very loud amp, you'll be closer. The difference is that no amp is required at all.

Before you simply wave your hand and select options based on a cursory read of various websites, you really want to learn a bit more about what you're working with.
Last edited by dspellman at Nov 5, 2016,
#12
One final thing -- an eBow is an excellent tool, but is a completely different animal from a sustainer. If you think of a sustainer more as the kind of reaction your guitar gets to standing next to a very loud amp, you'll be closer. The difference is that no amp is required at all.


True, but both can be used for some of the same tricks, like infinite sustain. And if a sutainer is not an option, the eBow still is.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!


alhaq369
It is very impotent to success a business.
#13
dspellman yeah I read a few things wrong. Also should've clarified better... installation 125 plus a little extra for batter box.... the pickup is 225.... also I know the importance of the battery box.... I've owned 2 Jackson dk2s models and even using lithium batteries it still went through one every month..... right now I narrowed out it down to Ibanez, or a preloaded schecter that I got a coupon on.... and sls style neck.... it's a tough choice
#14
Umm first of all, a good guitar does not have to cost that much. U can find good used ones or even new ones that are pretty good. I have never spent more than 200 on a guitar and all my guitars are fucking amazing. Because i make em sound good, not because they have high quality parts.

At any rate thats biased of course and you want to spend that much thats fine. You'd honestly be better off getting a cheap piece of wood in the shape of a guitar with frets and swapping out the parts you dont like (which IMO will do nothing to change the tone if your hands cant play well).

Now im not insulting playing because i dont know you. But im just saying gotta play good to sound good.

Now to help you with your decision.

I honestly think the iron label guitars are badass and look good but the other day i saw they were made with plywood so definitely go with the jackson lol. My honest opinion is get neither as i hate both companies lmao. Go with a schecter for that price and come out with something way higher quality and better parts and probably cheaper. Schecter omen and damien come to mind. C-1 platinum. Hellraiser, etc.