#1
I have a PRS SE Angelus Custom that I bought second hand. Stupid me didn't realise that the original run were made without electronics, so I accidentally bought one.. I decided to keep it, but I needed to plug it in, and so after reading many reviews I fitted a K&K Pure Mini pickup as it was the only good one in my budget.

Short story is that I'm very happy with the sound of the pickup, I'm not looking to replace it. However, the guitar is VERY prone to low-end feedback if I'm within 25-30ft of my amp or monitor, which is fairly ridiculous in my limited experience. I absolutely NEED to have my rubber sound-hole cover in place if I'm playing anywhere with volume.

I play mostly in my local church where I can have the amp hidden away elsewhere to be mic'd up or use the direct DI output, then we use IEMs so I don't need a stage monitor. However it's a total pain in the ass at practice, and I'm going to playing a bunch of acoustic gigs in some local pubs/bars over the coming months.

Are there any recommendations for what might fix this? I don't really want to much over £100 because then I might as well pull out the K&K pickup and fit an active system like a LR Baggs Anthem SL that I've heard has virtually no feedback issues.

Any ideas would be great
PRS SE Chris Robertson
Yamaha SF1000 (Both of 'em)
Fender Stratocaster

PRS SE Angelus Custom

Laney L20H Lionheart
Marshall 1936 w/ Eminence

Rather large pedalboard..
#2
Piezos on a true acoustic can also feed back. And do.
The acoustic guitars in the local P&W band are always fighting this.

The cure is to not use an acoustic guitar. No, seriously.
I have a Variax Acoustic 700. Looks like this:



It *looks* like a thinline acoustic (P&W bands can be nearly as *visually* restrictive as metal bands ), so it blends in.
But underneath the nice spruce top, it's a solid body mahogany guitar. It's got piezo saddles that feed the Variax electronics, so it *sounds* like a boomy Martin D28 or even a 12-string (lots of modeled guitars to choose from) or even a nylon-string guitar. What it sounds like is NOT a piezo-equipped guitar, but like a *miked* guitar (and you can change the virtual "distance" of the mike from the guitar with one of the controls).

In fact, I've fed it into a Helix with the IR of a Taylor 314 miked in air with a Schoeps, and what comes out of the PA system is that glorious 314.

This guy uses one on some pretty noisy stages:



Another option (though on the edge when it comes to being very visually P&W "acoustic") is a Taylor T5, which covers electric to acoustic really well (but at a pretty hefty price).

Last edited by dspellman at Nov 6, 2016,
#3
Modern mixes heavily cut bass frequencies out of the acoustic guitar signal. If your sound guys are not doing that, get it done for them.
#4
I really don't want to change the guitar, while I appreciate the suggestion! I've spent years looking for an acoustic that feels comfortable in my hands so I'd quite like to stop looking further now xD I'm primarily an electric player, but sometimes the need arises.. :P

I hadn't really thought too much about EQing at the amp/desk level, I'd sort of assumed that frequency specific feedback would be best tackled with an onboard pre-amp, if I had one. So realistically if I cut the bass on my amp, it should reduce it? Sorry for being such a noob..
PRS SE Chris Robertson
Yamaha SF1000 (Both of 'em)
Fender Stratocaster

PRS SE Angelus Custom

Laney L20H Lionheart
Marshall 1936 w/ Eminence

Rather large pedalboard..
#5
dspellman those Godin acousticasters are also pretty sweet.

And Jon Kammerer has some nice feedback-resistant (patented) acoustics.
http://www.jonkammerercustoms.com

makutoid, I realize you don't want to keep looking, but sometimes it's the best option. If the above suggestions don't work- or something like that old hollowbody trick of using foam rubber inside the body- then a new guitar might be your best option.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!


alhaq369
It is very impotent to success a business.
#6
Quote by makutoid
I hadn't really thought too much about EQing at the amp/desk level, I'd sort of assumed that frequency specific feedback would be best tackled with an onboard pre-amp, if I had one. So realistically if I cut the bass on my amp, it should reduce it? Sorry for being such a noob..
No worries. You can cut out specific problem frequencies while still leaving the signal mostly intact. That usually requires either an extensive graphic EQ (a lot of frequency selections) or a parametric EQ (allows you to sweep through the frequencies with a single knob). I doubt an on-board guitar preamp will have a large enough graphic EQ to help you here, but some preamps do have a parametric EQ. Also could be called a feedback reducer or de-squelcher or something like that.

However, as I said, just straight up cutting the bass on the acoustic guitar is smart for a modern mix. Either on the sound board or at your guitar/amp. You do not need a specific frequency selected, just cut bass. I do not often hear about micing up acoustic guitar amps. If you like the sound of it, cool, but use the DI as often as you can. I imagine the mic is not doing you any favors.
Last edited by Will Lane at Nov 6, 2016,
#7
As another guitarist who plays live acoustic a lot, I feel your pain. I don't care for the slimline guitars and I can't stand it when an inept house sound guy cuts all the low end so my once natural sounding acoustic now sounds like a banjo or mandolin. Arrgh!!!

This is my suggestion:
* Get the Baggs Para DI with notch filter https://reverb.com/p/lr-baggs-para-acoustic-di?_aid=pla&hfid=3357983&gclid=CKDdnvvSldACFQSUfgodILAJnQ
* Get in a room with your amp and find the resonant frequency of your soundboard (mine is 106hz or Ab). Every guitar has a resonant frequency that causes feedback. Find yours and use the notch filter on the Baggs to cut that frequency and tame your feedback. If you cut too much you will lose some of the warmth of your guitar sound so find a level that tames feedback while preserving your overall tone. Once you have this, now fine tune your sound with the rest of the excellent EQ available on the Baggs. Done! This will give you very useable live volume for worship but if stage volume is excessive, acoustic resonant feedback may return.

Protip: Also play onstage far away from the bass amp which may be a big source of the acoustic resonance. If you MUST use an acoustic amp, point it at your head, not your knees and turn it down as much as possible. I run mostly direct these days with a little acoustic guitar in my monitor.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resonance
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Nov 6, 2016,
#8
Quote by makutoid
I really don't want to change the guitar, while I appreciate the suggestion! I've spent years looking for an acoustic that feels comfortable in my hands so I'd quite like to stop looking further now xD I'm primarily an electric player, but sometimes the need arises.. :P


I understand. I've got a '67 Martin D35, a relatively new Taylor 814ce and a beater Yamaha round hole acoustic, and had the same issues. Fought them for a long time, until I got the Acoustic 700. No more fighting, no weird EQs, don't have to hide all the wedges on the other side of the stage, no need for an acoustic amp.

At least you know there's a pretty ironclad solution out there if you get frustrated.