#1
So, I've recently acquired some pedals and it's my first time tinkering with pedal effects, so it would be really helpful if you guys could give me some suggestions as how to use them. This is what I have at the moment:

My amp is a Bugera vintage 55 and I'm using a japanese G&L S-500 and a new Epiphone Sheraton II Pro. Style-wise, I'm looking for blues, classic rock, jazz-fusion, progressive rock (70's), jazz-rock, krautrock... . Nothing to heavy, mostly 60s / 70s , but anything is worth trying.

So , how do I get some nice sounds outta there? If you could share some configurations that you like (with all the amounts for each knob, etc..) , I would love to test them and work my own sound from there and my own experimentation.

Thank you, and by the way, I'm new here, great forum you got going here, congratulations.
#2
some nice pedals there

japanese g&l? i thought they were either usa-built or indonesian, but i could be wrong.

pedal order- put the fuzz face first. weird things can happen if it's not the first pedal your guitar sees (especially if pedals in front are buffered). then probably the compressor, then the tubescreamer, then the ds1 and then the equaliser (you could put the eq in front of the ts and ds1 instead, but after means you can tailor the eq after it comes out of the pedal to tame any harsh or annoying frequencies).

tones: a lot of people run a fuzz face with both knobs up full, and then control it with the guitar's volume control- so if you want a cleaner tone, roll the guitar's volume down a bit. generally you'd have the volume on the guitar turned down at least a bit most of the time for more overdrivey-sounding rhythm tones, turn it down further for cleaner tones, and then whack it up full for leads. sometimes you get a bit of noise with the pedal's knobs turned fully up, so if you do, you can roll off either the volume or fuzz knob (on the pedal) just slightly until the noise goes down.

compression- i don't really use compression much, i'll let someone else field that one.

tubescreamer- couple of options. If you're using it as a boost (either to boost your amp's overdrive channel or to boost the ds1) then set the level up full, the tone to around 2 o'clock and the drive to minimum. ***WARNING- only use this setting with an already pretty distorted tone (either from the amp or the ds1) or it'll give you a massive volume boost which might deafen you.***

Using it as a boost lets you get more sustain, compression, saturation and the pinch harmonics etc. will jump off the fretboard. It also works well with the ds1 because a ds1 is scooped and a tubescreamer is very middy, so they balance up nicely- use (for example) the ds1 (or the amp's overdrive channel) for slightly more scooped rhythm tones and then kick in the tubescreamer as a boost for leads.

You can also use the tubescreamer as a standalone overdrive as well (i.e. getting the overdrive from the pedal). In that case, again probable set the tone somewhere around 12-2 o'clock, the drive depending on how much drive you want and then set the volume to the volume you want it to be.

the ds1 is a bit picky, but if you set the tone knob to between 10-11 o'clock that's where most (all ) of the nice tones are. after that it's just a matter of setting the distortion depending on how heavy you want it (again around 10 - 11 o'clock is a nice setting for a medium amount of crunch, especially if you're going to boost it with the tubescreamer since you don't want too much distortion in that case) and set the volume based on how loud you want it to be.

EQ- like with the compressor I don't use them too much. you could use it to boost or cut the bass if things are getting too thin- or muddy-sounding respectively (the left-hand side sliders, the lower numbers in Hz), boost the mids if the ds1 is too scooped (the middle sliders) or cut the highs if the ds1 is too fizzy (the right-hand sliders). There are likely a bunch of other things you could do with it as well.
Quote by crownegamers
I saw in a couple of pictures that on Bucketheads Les Paul (only some pictures) that his neck pickup is painted in white. Can anyone explain to me why he would do this, and if there are any pros and cons.

Quote by dspellman
The guy wears a KFC Bucket and a white mask during performances, and you're interested in the color of his pickup covers?

#3
Dave_Mc
Thank you for going into so much detail, @Dave_Mc !

The japanese G&L is an older model, from a time when they where manufacured there instead of Indonesia, and so it's supposed to be better than the new ones, I bought it second hand.

About the fuzz face, how do you control that the overall volume stay more or less constant, if you use the guitar volume to control the distortion? I mean, if I lower the volume to get a cleaner tone, I would also get less volume and would have to increase it with another pedal or the amp, which kind of defeats the purpose of controlling drive with the easy-to-reach guitar knob. Or get a volume pedal, but I've spent enough for some time
Also, the fuzz face is a 90s model, I'm not sure how similar it is to the new ones.

Any suggestions for a nice blues tone? not too overdriven, but good for lead. Maybe combining the tubescreamer and the amp drive channel. I've seen people put two overdrive pedals together, I don't know if it would be the same with tubescreamer + drive channel on the amp.

thanks again
#4
no problem

ah right. yeah that makes sense about the g&ls, i haven't tried the japanese ones (obviously, since I hadn't heard of them ) but most of the japanese-made guitars I've tried have been great, so I wouldn't be surprised if yours is nicer than the newer ones.

have you tried the fuzz face with your guitar volume? any i've tried (i haven't tried your exact one, i'm not sure if there's much difference or not between yours and the "classic" circuit) the volume hasn't dropped all that much when you roll down the guitar volume, your guitar volume becomes more of a distortion control than a volume control when you use it with an overdriven/distorted/fuzzed tone. that being said it might still cut the volume a little... it depends on how much that annoys you. you could put a clean boost pedal (I don't think a volume pedal will work, most just work more or less like your guitar volume i.e. are passive and only cut volume) after the fuzz in the chain, but that'd involve buying more pedals which you don't want to do.

yep you can absolutely combine your tubescreamer with the drive channel (either when using it as a boost or as a standalone overdrive)- it just depends on what type of tone (and how much overdrive/distortion) you want. a tubescreamer will do a pretty decent blues lead tone by itself, but it's pretty middy-sounding- some people prefer more bite. i just generally set the tone on a tubescreamer at around 2 o'clock and then set the gain based on what i want (in the lower half for lower gain stuff, higher up for higher gain stuff) and then after that set the volume control to be how loud you want it.

if it's too middy the amp's overdrive channel on its own might be a better idea for a blues tone? it's up to you really. i haven't tried your amp so i don't know how it sounds.
Quote by crownegamers
I saw in a couple of pictures that on Bucketheads Les Paul (only some pictures) that his neck pickup is painted in white. Can anyone explain to me why he would do this, and if there are any pros and cons.

Quote by dspellman
The guy wears a KFC Bucket and a white mask during performances, and you're interested in the color of his pickup covers?

#5
Fuzz Faces and many similar fuzz pedals only go a little above unity (volume same whether pedal is on or off) so basically when you turn the volume knob all the way up the pedal is a little louder than just the guitar into amp. this give it a little more range when you use the volume knob on the guitar. it will clean up before you get a really noticeable volume drop through the amp. pretty sure your Fuzz Face is a germanium one which can be subject to temperature differences so keep that in mind.
#6
monwobobbo yes it is a germanium one. Well, I'll tinker with it. How much temperature difference changes its sound? like the difference between a heated indoor place and cold outside, or is it more sensible? Should I do something about it, is there a "good" temperature, or is it just something to keep in mind to account for changes in sound? I'm guessing a real pro would keep it heated or not leave it in the sun, but for the moment It's gonna stay home.
#7
Quote by brian_cohen
monwobobbo yes it is a germanium one. Well, I'll tinker with it. How much temperature difference changes its sound? like the difference between a heated indoor place and cold outside, or is it more sensible? Should I do something about it, is there a "good" temperature, or is it just something to keep in mind to account for changes in sound? I'm guessing a real pro would keep it heated or not leave it in the sun, but for the moment It's gonna stay home.


sorry I can't give you exact temperatures I don't think there are specific ones. just that as the diodes get cold or hot, the way they react changes. in a relatively stable environment it should be fine but yeah outdoors or in a real hot or cold place it may not sound the way you are used to. I never really had any issues when I was using the one I had.