#1
Hi. I have a gig coming up and want to play most of it on my SG Standard, but there are few songs in the set that sound better with single coils, so I plan on using my Telecaster (a vintage 52).

I love both my guitars but they are really different beasts! At home if I switch between the two, I need to adjust the volume of not just my guitar / amp but also of several pedals. Most noticably its my 2 distortion pedals that behave really differently. For the tele, I have to hugely increase the gain, and hugely lower the volume. If I leave it set how I like it for the SG, its way too loud. And that's just the distortion - to get the best sound out of both guitars, most pedal settings need a little tweaking.

I know that hùmbuckers and single coils are very different, so one guitar will always be louder than the other. You can deal with that by adjusting the louder guitar's volume. But it's not really that practical to stop and adjust each individual pedal every time you need to change guitars and the rest of the band are staring at you while you hold up the show.

So, my question is - does anyone have any advice about switching between two very different guitars on stage? Especially as far as how differently they react to distortion. I have to run both through the same amp/rig which I realise is part of the problem. And no, I wont have a sound guy manning the mixing table either :-(

Thanks!
Last edited by imablackstar at Nov 6, 2016,
#2
Rehearse the set, start to finish - exactly as you'll perform it - with the band.

That way, they know how long you'll take, and will cover for you.
Quote by Diemon Dave
Don't go ninjerin nobody don't need ninjerin'
#3
Put a clean boost in front of all your pedals and adjust it to normalize levels between guitars. On for Tele, off for SG. I sometimes use the same 2 guitars and this works for me. Test it at home first and get it dialed in so you are not fumbling around at the gig.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis
#4
Quote by Cajundaddy
Put a clean boost in front of all your pedals and adjust it to normalize levels between guitars. On for Tele, off for SG. I sometimes use the same 2 guitars and this works for me. Test it at home first and get it dialed in so you are not fumbling around at the gig.
This would be my advice, or you could use an EQ with a level boost if you feel the guitars merit different amp settings also (obviously it's not the same as using the amp's EQ, but it's something).
#5
Quote by Cajundaddy
Put a clean boost in front of all your pedals and adjust it to normalize levels between guitars. On for Tele, off for SG. I sometimes use the same 2 guitars and this works for me. Test it at home first and get it dialed in so you are not fumbling around at the gig.

Exactly what I was going to suggest

Graphic EQ pedal suggestion is also a good one. I used to use a kind of middle ground - a Nobels PRE-1 with treble and bass EQ that allowed me to boost the level for my single coils and add a bit of extra low end/round off some of the extra bite so that I didn't need to re-EQ the amp to prevent the single coils from sounding a bit anemic and shrill in the mix compared to the humbuckers.
Happiness is a warm Vox AC30
#6
Cool, thanks guys. Never owned a clean boost pedal before, but sounds like just the job!
#7
There are also ABY switches with built-in level adjustment. Might be handy as well if you have the space to have both plugged in at the same time. Take new guitar, press a button and you're good to go. I used to do it that way, minus the level adjustment.
#8
Quote by I K0nijn I
There are also ABY switches with built-in level adjustment. Might be handy as well if you have the space to have both plugged in at the same time. Take new guitar, press a button and you're good to go. I used to do it that way, minus the level adjustment.


Boss Line Selector can do this, no need to unplug/ plug in guitars between songs either.
#9
Quote by imablackstar


So, my question is - does anyone have any advice about switching between two very different guitars on stage? Especially as far as how differently they react to distortion. I have to run both through the same amp/rig which I realise is part of the problem.



This is a pretty common issue, and it happens even with a single guitar switching pickups.
I use a modeler/multi-FX with user presets. Since you can select EQ and volume, etc., for each preset, I just select the right preset for the guitar I'm using. Truth is, the set list is pretty well fixed, so if there's a guitar change, I'm ready to go.
#10
i use an EQ pedal for that purpose. it gives a small boost to the strat when i want it.