#1
I'm sure this has been asked a lot and it's all over the web but I get all different answers. First off I'll just list what I'm using for equipment
-Orange OR15 (Mid-Gain setting)
-Celestion v30's/Celestion G12t-75's in X pattern (4x12)
-Shure Sm57
-various other drum mics from CAD drum mic set
-Presonus firestudio audio interface
-Presonus Studio One
-that's all I can of now other other small things (cables, etc..)

So I've tried going mono with recording with just the SM57 and stereo with the SM57 and an overhead both sounded flat and just plan gross. Also I get a lot of feedback from my computer, so if I isolate myself in a box covered with blankets will that get rid of the feedback? Any other tips would be appreciative
#2
On the tracks you're recording to, turn off "monitor." It's usually set to auto, but if you're in the room with your amps, you don't want it on.

& wear headphones to hear the play back. Those two things should take care of the feedback issues.

As far as sounding flat & gross... it may just be a personal thing. SM57s have been used as you described for years with good results, but it just may not be your thing. If you're using recorded tone off an album or something as your reference then you've just realized it takes work to get those tones. It's also possible you need to move the mic around aiming at different parts of the speaker, or even off axis to find what you like.
#3
Quote by bramante98
I'm sure this has been asked a lot and it's all over the web but I get all different answers. First off I'll just list what I'm using for equipment
-Orange OR15 (Mid-Gain setting)
-Celestion v30's/Celestion G12t-75's in X pattern (4x12)
-Shure Sm57
-various other drum mics from CAD drum mic set
-Presonus firestudio audio interface
-Presonus Studio One
-that's all I can of now other other small things (cables, etc..)

So I've tried going mono with recording with just the SM57 and stereo with the SM57 and an overhead both sounded flat and just plan gross. Also I get a lot of feedback from my computer, so if I isolate myself in a box covered with blankets will that get rid of the feedback? Any other tips would be appreciative
How are you getting feedback from your computer? Are you using speaker monitors to monitor the signal and that is going back into the mic? Just use headphone monitoring if that is the case.

Make a clip of a tone you have worked with but still sounds "flat and just plain gross" so we can hear what you hear. Mic placement is very important as well. Closer to the center off the speaker is brighter and gives stronger attack, closer to the edge of the cone is darker and mellower. Using two mics on the same sound source can cause phase-cancelling relationships between the two tracks. Which can sound cool but can also sound bad.
#4
RevBillyG, Will Lane. whenever i record i wear headphones so i dont think thats issue, i have my laptop for just general use and its on all the time then next to that is my computer tower for souley recording. I think the feedback issue may just be the fans from my laptop so next time i record ill try shutting off my laptop and seeing if that helps. Do you have any recommendations at getting a deeper tone? I've read on certain sites that layering two guitar tracks and having less distortion on each will get rid of that messy sound (you know what i mean?). I will get a clip of the sound just so you guys know what im talking about. I will try positioning the mic on different parts of the speaker but half of my cab sounds different than the other half because of the mixed speakers, none the less i will try it.
#5
Double-tracking (recording the part once and then duplicating with a second take) will certainly result in a thicker, wider sound. It may depend on your setup but for me this can introduce phase issues (noticeable in mono but not when you pan the takes to each side, one left and one right) despite much of the writing online either not mentioning this or some people even saying it's not possible. It is. Anyway, just something to watch out for. I think in future I'll try to use a different guitar or amp for the doubled track to reduce partial phase cancellation. If you have that option i'd recommend it as the combination of different guitars or amps could provide a more pleasing double track sound anyway.

Good recorded guitar tone probably starts with your amp EQ anyway. If you have a flat sound try adjusting particularly the mid (if your amp has one) and treble knobs to get something close to ideal before even putting up a mic.

Maybe some slipperman advice will help: https://www.dropbox.com/s/8n4mfaffw5pfhpl/Slipperman%27s%20Recording%20Distorted%20Guitars%20From%20Hell%20%28readable%20version%29.pdf?dl=0
Don't put your ear to the speaker though (something he suggests) as this is just dangerous for your hearing.
"If you want beef, then bring the ruckus." - Marilyn Monroe
Last edited by USCENDONE BENE at Nov 7, 2016,
#6
bramante98 the setup you have should definitely sound good with the right positioning.

How's the sound in the room?

I'd start with just one mic and work on that before you do more advanced setups. Maybe try iso headphones and record at higher volumes, setting up the mic better while listening at the levels. Iso headphones help me blast it and find the right mic position without going deaf.

How old are the amp tubes/last servicing?
If you're going for higher gain you might need noise gate and overdrive to play with. It is possible you might have el. wiring issue in the room as well.
#7
Well i tried turning off my laptop during recording and it certainly did help get rid of the feedback so thats pretty much solved. I also tried mic'ing individual speakers as Will Lane said and there was a definite sound difference between the v30s and g15t's but i dont know if there is a way that i can get the sound of both without having to do separate tracks or maybe im just better off layering them. They also sounded much better after tweaking the EQ in Studio One but still lacked depth, ill just experiment more with layering and go from there. I do use sound isolating headphones (Shure SE215's) but just the raw recording of the guitar sounds flat before tweaking it with EQ. The whole studio is in my unfinished basement so there are bare concrete walls every here and there but there is A LOT of other misc stuff in here, so would you recommend draping a blanket over the mic and cab? i have tried panning the drum overhead tracks to the Left or Right in the past and it wouldn't work, i haven't really fiddled with panning since then. I'm pretty sure the tubes in my amp are fine i have taken everything (Guitar, Amp, PA speaker) outside before and played and it sounded beautiful, no odd noises but if there is a way to test them then lemme know. Also what would you consider high gain? I go just under half gain for pop punk, im sorry but metalcore lol, and stuff like that, so nothing too crazy. Also I've got two electric guitars one sounds brighter than the other and i use that one mostly then the other i haven't really figured out how to get a brighter tone out of but it has seymour duncan JB in the bridge. Also ive got an electric acoustic that sounds just awesome with distortion but you'll go deaf if the volume on the amp is high. Sorry if i go off topic at all im just trying to give as much info as i can. Thanks for the replys too!
#8
Try the Fredman technique if you can:
http://www.metalrecording.com/archives/471

Or spot mic two mic at the same length and axis from your better sounding speaker, louder volume helps drown out the room, but you could try building a pillow or blanket fort around the amp to minimize reflection.
#9
Quote by bramante98
Sorry if i go off topic at all im just trying to give as much info as i can. Thanks for the replys too!


Have you mentioned what levels you're recording at? The sound level meters in your DAW, when you're recording are you in the red? Are you in the -6db range?