#1
I've made some refinements.


BODY

Made in America to exact Fender specifications.

Style: 70s Strat

Wood: 1 piece Honduran Mohagany

Control cavity: Back ( no pickguard)

Pickup configuration : HS

NECK

Nut: Locking

Type: Set-neck

Neck: Maple

Fretboard: Ebony

Scale: 27"

Frets: Stainless steel jumbo

PICKUPS

Bridge: Dimarzio D Sonic

Middle:

Neck:

( I'm not sure what pickups I'll be using in the mid position. Something clean sounding.

TUNERS:

Gotoh

Finish and pearl inlay pattern undetermined at this point however the body will most likely be finished with some kind of red or blue wood stain to show off the one piece mohagany.
Last edited by NorthstrumGuita at Nov 9, 2016,
#2
Worth noting that "Honduran (actually Honduras) Mahogany (sp)" is difficult to come by. The same species of mahogany has been replanted through out asian and is currently sourced from places like Fiji and Indonesia.

Also worth noting that you've specified an HS pickup configuration, which has no "middle" pickup.

A body made to "exact Fender specifications" would be a bolt-neck guitar and would have routs and channels that would not be the same as those for a set neck rear-mount setup. What's the point of making the body "in America?" Since you're likely using CNC machines in any event, it really doesn't matter. Putting an active pickup in the bridge and a passive in the neck is a bit of a pain in the butt, since one requires battery power and the other requires a different pot.

You've specified a locking nut, but there's no matching trem mentioned. What's the point? If you've got a locking nut, the tuners aren't particularly important.
One piece mahogany really doesn't make much of a difference compared to a two piece body.

Note that if you have a 28" scale, you're going to want to figure bridge placement according to the number of frets you want clear of the body.

Also worth noting that Carvin can build anyone this instrument (and they source some *great* woods) right this second, and they can do it with neck-through construction.

And finally, Rondo Music makes a guitar very close to this spec now for $499. http://www.rondomusic.com/product7641.html
It's a superstrat body rather than a Fender Stratalike, but it comes with Blackouts, a 28.65" scale, a mahogany body with a carved (arched) top, neck-through-body construction, 24 jumbo frets, 14" radius ebony fretboard. This is a production version, but a semi-custom can be ordered with stainless frets and a different pickup configuration, as well as various trems.
#3
dspellman

I'm leaning towards a 27" scale now, but you're right, that guitar is exactly what I'm looking for. Close enough. I could refret it with SS frets myself.

How are they able to sell a guitar for literally half the price that I'm able to obtain the materials for?

Made in Korea though, so I can't see the quality being as good as something I could make by hand, it's probably still a well built instrument.

Shit, I think I might buy this. It already has the Blackouts too. I almost can't justify making one myself now, maybe for the extra frets, but that's it.

I almost can't justify spending 1000$+ just on materials when I can buy this thing and mod it.. Although 500 USD is like 700$ Canadian before taxes, and with taxes we're basically at the 1000$ mark... So I'm actually better off building myself exactly what I want and having something built better for the same price..


But man, it's tempting to grab this thing up..
#4
Quote by NorthstrumGuita
dspellman

I'm leaning towards a 27" scale now, but you're right, that guitar is exactly what I'm looking for. Close enough. I could refret it with SS frets myself.

How are they able to sell a guitar for literally half the price that I'm able to obtain the materials for?

Made in Korea though, so I can't see the quality being as good as something I could make by hand, it's probably still a well built instrument.



I've got a couple of Carvins with SS frets. I like 'em. But I certainly wouldn't refret an existing guitar just to get to stainless frets (or EVO's or whatever) before the existing frets wore out.
The price differential should be obvious. You're buying materials in ones and twos. The factories that build these guitars buy it in carloads. If you ever get a chance to hit the Winter NAMM show (Anaheim in January), you'll find out how much this stuff really costs when purchased in bulk.
#5
Quote by NorthstrumGuita

How are they able to sell a guitar for literally half the price that I'm able to obtain the materials for?


Economies of scale.

Quote by NorthstrumGuita

I almost can't justify spending 1000$+ just on materials when I can buy this thing and mod it.. Although 500 USD is like 700$ Canadian before taxes, and with taxes we're basically at the 1000$ mark... So I'm actually better off building myself exactly what I want and having something built better for the same price..


If you can buy the guitar for $1000, or you can buy the materials for $1000, then it is more expensive to make it yourself. You need to factor in the cost of any tools you buy/ have bought for the purpose of building the guitar, any other consumables you use (glue, solder, etc), and - most importantly - your time. Every hour you spend working on the guitar is an hour you could be spending doing other work and getting paid for it; opportunity cost. Like, I was going to make a Big Muff, but it made more sense for me to take the hours I would have spent building it, do some overtime at work, and buy one.
#6
Quote by luke.g.henderso
Economies of scale.

Plus other factors like:

long-term business relationships- possibly including long-term contacts with price caps
using different suppliers
vertical and horizontal integration
local regulations & taxes
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!


alhaq369
It is very impotent to success a business.
#8
That vid makes one of the same mistakes that many do: the pickups are not the same, they are similar. Anyone who knows pickups knows that they can vary as much as anything else. Entropy, wear, etc. mean that even the best mass-manufactured items will vary over time. And the same goes for all the bits of wiring between pickup and jack. The pots & wires in the mahogany guitars are similar, but not identical.

If they really wanted to prove their theory with scientific rigor, they'd have swapped the pickups & wiring out of the two bodies.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!


alhaq369
It is very impotent to success a business.
#11
Rob Chapman strongly believes in the impact of tonewoods on the guitar's sound, so I wouldn't trust anything he has to say on the subject as impartial.

Quote by Explorerbuilder
Answer me this... Why are you even posting on an interactive forum, if you just fight with everybody and only listen to yourself? That defeats the purpose of a forum. And trust me... If any of your future customers do background checks on you (Which they WILL) and see this, you are done for....


This is from a guy who actually makes and sells guitars, so you might want to listen to what he has to say.
#12
luke.g.henderso

You guys don't know what you're talking about.
According to you people the only thing that matters for tone is your pickup.
#13
Quote by luke.g.henderso
Rob Chapman strongly believes in the impact of tonewoods on the guitar's sound, so I wouldn't trust anything he has to say on the subject as impartial.


This is from a guy who actually makes and sells guitars, so you might want to listen to what he has to say.
Yup. He makes damn pretty ones, too.
Quote by Diemon Dave
Don't go ninjerin nobody don't need ninjerin'
#14
luke.g.henderso

A guitar is the sum of all its parts and every type of wood has its own tonal properties. Body shape and type of wood = volume and mass which affects resonance and thus the amplified sound. If you were to look at the sound waves on a computer screen you'd see that the sound is different. Some people can hear this subtle difference. You guys can't and so you think we're lying.
#15
slapsymcdougal

Like I just said.


"A guitar is the sum of all its parts and every type of wood has its own tonal properties. Body shape and type of wood = volume and mass which affects resonance and thus the amplified sound. If you were to look at the sound waves on a computer screen you'd see that the sound is different. Some people can hear this subtle difference. You guys can't and so you think we're lying."
#16
Quote by NorthstrumGuita
luke.g.henderso
You guys don't know what you're talking about.
According to you people the only thing that matters for tone is your pickup.



Quote by luke.g.henderso

Unfortunately, that guy doesn't list on YouTube the rest of his signal path, but I'm sure that a lot of guitars with the same scale length, the same string gauges , the same tuning, the same type of bridge, similar spec humbuckers, played by the same player, with the same pick, through the same rig, on the same settings, would sound close enough that it wouldn't matter.


Tell me again how I think that only pickups matter.

Does wood make a difference? Yes. Would making a Strat out of mahogany rather than alder or basswood, all other things being equal, make it sound significantly different? No.
Last edited by luke.g.henderso at Nov 9, 2016,
#17
luke.g.henderso

I'm going to build two identical guitars with different bodies ( mohagany and basswood) and you'll see the difference. I'll show you the actual sound waves.
#18
Couple of things you might consider -- you've pointed out that the Ibanez 30-fret guitar has frets that are "accessible." Note that this is NOT a Fender-spec strat body by any stretch, nor is it a set-neck. I'm guessing you've never played a 30-fret guitar before. But here are some other interesting bits and pieces...

A 27" scale guitar with 30 frets has a last fret (the center of the fret) that's about 22.227" from the nut. Add in the width of the fret and the width of wood necessary to hold that fret, and you're now looking at a fretboard that's at least 22.500" long. If you have a Schaller Floyd Rose trem on this guitar, you need to locate it 26.404" (± 0.030") from the nut. You also need to allow .25 - .38" of space between the front of the Floyd and the edge of the pickup ring on the bridge humbucker. A pickup ring is about 1 3/4" wide. That leaves about 1 3/4" for another humbucker (or the total width of a neck pickup ring) with NO space between the pickups at all.

Take another look at the Ibanez; there's barely enough room there for a single coil, much less another humbucker OR three pickups. And, of course, the body shape that allows you access to the upper frets is nothing like a Fender strat any more, and, if you're claiming benefits accruable to the Strat body shape, you're out of luck.

There's this: the center-to-center (of the fret) space between the 29th and the 30th fret on a 27" scale guitar is 0.284", which doesn't take into account the width of a standard jumbo fret, which is .103". I can play that with a fingernail, but not with my XXL fingers.

One final thing. Please stop stating that "a 30-fret guitar gives you an additional pentatonic scale." It gives you 6 extra frets.
A pentatonic scale includes 5 notes, but those notes are the 1-2-3-5-6 of the major scale. Unless I don't understand a pentatonic scale, you don't have enough frets for that. Explain to me, for example, how many frets it takes to play C - D - E - G - A (C Major Pentatonic Scale).
Last edited by dspellman at Nov 9, 2016,
#19
luke.g.henderso

" Significantly " is all in the eye of the beholder, or in this case, the ear of the beholder lol... It's all relative and subjective.

Listen, I know you guys are more experienced guitar builders than me and probably better at playing as well, however what you're telling me seems to go against the grain of knowledge of a lot of people, and I can legitimately notice a difference in how different wood sounds and the science backs everything up.

I'm going to have to experiment and and come to my own scientific conclusion once and for all.