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#1
According to TechCrunch (https://techcrunch.com/2015/09/10/software-is-eating-rocknroll/), over 90% of new guitarists quit within the first year. The problem is so overwhelming that companies are trying different things to get new players to stick with the guitar.

Most notably, the Mi Guitar (https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/mi-guitar-by-magic-instruments-music-play#/) was created to make learning guitar as easy as possible. However, you had to buy a whole guitar that you would eventually outgrow, making it an expensive proposition.

Then there are devices like FRETX (https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/fretx-the-smart-device-that-teaches-you-guitar-music/x/15409587#/) that you strap to your guitar to help teach new guitarists some basic chords and songs. It's affordable but will it actually get people to stick with guitar?

Even guitar maker, Fender, is looking into creating apps (http://shop.fender.com/en-US/tuneapp) that will hopefully keep new players playing.

My question is, will these devices and apps actually help new guitar players? How quickly will they outgrow these devices and seek more advanced techniques or teachers that can help them grow?

It'd be interesting to hear thoughts from teachers and those who've struggled sticking with the guitar.
#2
It's because your mom is easier.
I like St. Anger. Ridicule me, daddy
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#5
Because:

1) A lot of people get into it for the wrong reasons and when they realize it doesn't work that way (IE hur dur guitar will get me gurlzzz) they give up

2) Guitar isn't exactly easy and a lot of people are impatient and want instant gratification (which music doesnt provide)

3) Guitar music isn't as popular anymore so less people pick it up

4) It's an expensive hobby that takes a lot of time and as you age, you tend to have less time.
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my mom and i went to a furry con and on the second day she said she didn't come and pay money to go see dumb shit.


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#8
Quote by Baby Joel


Quote by Axelfox
my mom and i went to a furry con and on the second day she said she didn't come and pay money to go see dumb shit.


Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
#9
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
Because:

1) A lot of people get into it for the wrong reasons and when they realize it doesn't work that way (IE hur dur guitar will get me gurlzzz) they give up


Those are what I like to call "guitar bros." They only want to pick up chicks and guitar SEEMS like the easiest instrument to play with some sex appeal. No one's dropping panties for your sweet flute skills.
#10
Quote by fretnoob
Those are what I like to call "guitar bros." They only want to pick up chicks and guitar SEEMS like the easiest instrument to play with some sex appeal. No one's dropping panties for your sweet flute skills.


Well, I don't know what to tell you but most of the people that take up guitar are 'guitar bros' for exactly that reason


No one is dropping panties for your sweet shredding skills either
Quote by Axelfox
my mom and i went to a furry con and on the second day she said she didn't come and pay money to go see dumb shit.


Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
#11
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R

No one is dropping panties for your sweet shredding skills either


But all the movies of guys playing guitars to woo girls! I've been lied to!
#12
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R


I like St. Anger. Ridicule me, daddy
Quote by ErikLensherr
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#13
Guitar is boring
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#14
I think some of it is actually that there's a "hill" over which you must step before you can begin to autonomously improve. At first there's a lot of building strength and dexterity in both hands, and learning sometimes confusing theory ("hey why is this a C and this an F#? why is there no B sharp?" "idek lol that's just how it is"). That's hard for some, and they can get disheartened very quickly because the mirror shine of "oh wow look as this B A D A S S guitar I got" quickly dirties when your fingers start to hurt.
#15
Banjocal Good points! I think music theory also turns people off, but it's a necessary evil if you want to be good at improvisation and want to improve your technique.
#16
I don't think it's necessary at all for improv, but it helps. I think that, if people learned why things are the way they are, they might have some deeper appreciation of it. I had the same problem in science classes: "why is it done like this?" (referring to empirical testing) "I don't know, it just is". Which roughly translates to "you're paying for this lack of knowledge right here, son".
#17
It's the same with any instrument and it ultimately amounts to impatience and fickleness.
It was my privilege
#18
most people pick up a guitar for the wrong reasons, or no reason at all.
you need goals to progress in music, whether it's improvise and make your own music, or learn your favorite songs or styles of music.
too many people pick up guitar and quit, because they don't have the patience (and many times, aptitude) to learn, research, and understand the basics.
pretty much everyone,outside of my circle of friends, who owns a dusty guitar sitting the corner of their bedroom always makes excuses like they don't have time to learn, or that it's too hard.
the reality is that learning guitar more or less easier than a majority of instruments,
at least if we're talking about basics like learning wonderwall on an acoustic, or greenday songs on electric...
#19
it's definitely very boring when you can just barely play a few chords & are just practicing them over & over.
i remember noodling around on & off and not really learning anything for a year or so before I had a sort of "breakthrough" & actually began to enjoy practicing -- and even then I was just learning a lot of green day & nirvana songs without really internalizing how the music "worked".

it took years & actually playing in a band & writing material with other people for me to get as good as i am at guitar, & i'm not even that good at guitar.
#20
In many ways the most musically difficult stage of being a guitar player is 6 months in where the novelty of being a guitar player goes stale, but you still aren't a good enough guitarist to play any proper songs yet. They realise pretty soon that none of their guitar heroes that bang chicks on an hourly basis had ever told them that playing guitars takes actual effort and self-discipline.

Anyone can get a guitar and an amp for practically nothing, which leads newbs into believing that the hobby is cheap, then by the 6 month mark they realize that owning a guitar and an amp that doesn't sound and play like shit isn't. You generally get what you pay for.
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#21
The same reason people quit in anything else. It's not easy or fun right away like what they thought it would be. It's not fun trying to learn what the difference is between an open G chord and a G bar chord when your hands hurt too much to press any of the strings down. Starting a brand new skill isn't easy, and that wall you hit starting out is pretty hard to break through when it's accompanied by physical pain in an area that's usually not very used to much pain. Expectations of being able to hit the ground running being met with a very different reality doesn't help either. It's the same reason people show up for the first session of an art class or a new sport a local gym is offering, then disappear within a week.

Failure and difficulty + expectations of easy fun + physical pain you're unaccustomed to = a situation a lot of people will just pass up, especially if there isn't any significant monetary or health gains from it.

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#25
because having tried to play the guitar at some point is as common and ordinary as having tried to ride a bike, it's just really accessible now
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#26
Quote by Will Lane
they give up after watching one of jrcsgtpep's videos
fuckin BOOSH
#27
Metronome + hours of practice = tedious and boring. Nobody want to sit for hours at a time going over the same shit again and again to build the muscle memory, finger independence and hand synchronisation that guitar requires. You either develop a love for what you do outside of the practice time or decide the effort isn't worth it. Who wan't to spend hours a day bored or frustrated when you can go on your console/computer and get instant gratification.
#28
I think in this new era of technology and instant gratification, people are finding it hard to concentrate and pursue a single goal with the passion provided to previous generations.

Why spend years learning when you could be Slash or Kirk Hammett with a Rockband controller on the first day.

With that in mind, the bar for guitarists is raised again, Nirvana and the likes were great in terms of equipment sales, as they showed a whole generation of kids that you can buy crappy guitar and amp and learn 3 chords and be a rock star. Niw, again as in the 80s and before, you're expected to have skill.
#29
The guitar has simply fallen out of fashion. The heyday of the 60s-80s is over. It's all about computer and sampling now. And yeah yeah, Taylor Swift sells guitars or whatever, but even she doesn't play guitar anymore and has gone electronica. If you walk into any Guitar Center today the happy clerks are at the keyboards and shit while the sad mopey clerks are at the guitars. The guitar market consequently has turned into either super expensive high-end guitars or shitty guitar-amp "beginner" sets. There isn't much in between like there used to be. It's just the way it is.

But what I do find interesting is there seems to be a new generation of guitarists emerging. Youtube perfectly captures this. 2 types of guitarists are prevalent doing guitar videos - the old guitar dad guy or the pimple-faced teenage rocker, and again not too many 20-30 yr olds. Millennials think guitar is cheesy. But the high school kids today seem to be a little more into guitar-oriented rock and listening to old stuff . Maybe it's some cyclical generation thing where they come around to their parents' music. But what I'm trying to say is that these guitar companies should be targeting this new youth. Forget the Millennials, they've forsaken guitar and aren't going to come around to it.
#30
Millenials are all about veganism, microbrews and growing rad beards while listening to computer generated synth music with autotuned cheese vocals...and Priuses...

But there's country which now sounds like hard rock, so there's hope.
#32
Quote by Will Lane
they give up after watching one of jrcsgtpep's videos


that's just to funny but really cruel.

I t does come down to "not as easy as it looks". learning to play takes a fair bit of time and even then there is no guarantee that you will be able to come up with your own awesome riffs, solos or songs. Guitar Hero turned many on to playing but surprise it's not just pushing buttons. agree that awesome shred skill don't get girls. I remember back in the late 80s I was playing in front of some friends and a couple of girls. the guys were indeed impressed with flash but the girls paid no attention. I play the opening riff to Back In Black and suddenly I'm a guitar god to the girls . girls want to hear a song they know plain and simple (and yes I did get one of the girls but that was a rare feat). my wife is like that now. my endless noodling means nothing play the simple riff from a new country song and suddenly I'm good.
#34
Quote by Will Lane
they give up after watching one of jrcsgtpep's videos

...Fuck me...
Quote by Axelfox
Please understand how little we as a community care
#35
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
...Fuck me...


I mean, its pretty sudden but sure...
Quote by Axelfox
my mom and i went to a furry con and on the second day she said she didn't come and pay money to go see dumb shit.


Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
#37
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
I mean, its pretty sudden but sure...


slut
#38
People quit because they lack motivation. They lack motivation because they don't practice enough to get past the initial difficulty hump. If you don't put in serious hours from the start, by that i mean at least 2 per day, than you risk spinning your wheels for a long time and giving up from lack of noticeable progress.

Also, many people never explore, improvise or write music - covers alone makes guitar repetitive and boring.
#39
Because it is harder than it looks. I guess it was easier when I started, Brit folk was riding on the back of skiffle, and you didn't have to be a guitar hero to play/perform Kumbaya. There was also the peer pressure thing, all my mates learned, more or less, and it did attract the girls at uni.

A few years back there was optimism that Guitar Hero would lead folks into playing real guitar. I don't think it ever did, it raised false hopes of the ease with which the skills could be transferred.
#40
I can tell you why I stopped playing after over 10 years. I just reached a plateau in my abilities. The friends that I used to play with outpaced me in improv skill and I felt like an idiot noodling along and ruining their jams. Part of it is lack of confidence in my playing, which developed after watching two other friends pick up the guitar and overtake me in skill after 6 months to a year. Another is not really being interested in the music they wanted to play. After quitting that band I didnt have much of a reason to play but I kept up with lessons. Finally learning about modes and some improv techniques but by that point I was kind of done with music. I stopped lessons at the end of last year because they were a waste of money. Havent played since. Two of my friends went to a jazz school, and one even became semi big by getting some radio airplay. Maybe I'll pick it up again sometime, but maybe not.
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