#1
Well, here's something that I believe may be unique to the guitar building world.

Here's something I call a burn etched finish that I'm guessing will look killer on a body with the right stain, type of wood and grain. I don't believe this method has been used to finish a guitar body before.

http://m.imgur.com/IIgIhnu

And I'm thinking about making my headstock logo like this. Obviously not that specific logo, just using this method.

http://m.imgur.com/WVqf5y8


It's called burn etching ( for lack of a better term) and I'm just wondering if this has been done before ? I'm sure it has so I'm just wondering if you know on which guitars specifically. I think it looks good and could easily be applied with a branding iron. I think it could also be used to easily put an etching into a fretboard. You could even fill the etching with some enamel paint if you wanted to.

Anyways, what do you guys think about applying a headstock logo with a branding iron like that? What about the body finish? And do you know if any of this has been done before? And what do you think about burn etching the fretboard and painting the it with enamel paint? I think just the black burn mark would look better anyways though.

As many of you may or may not know, I'm making my own guitars. The Northstrum Veracity.

A one piece hardtail mohagany 70s Strat, with a 30 SS jumbo fret 27" scale maple neck and ebony fretboard. Locking nut. Gotoh bridge. Dimarzio D Sonic in the bridge and something cleaner in the middle position.

I was going to do pearl inlays and still might, except I'm thinking I might be able to use a branding iron to etch the patterns. I could make patterns out of thin steel and basically brand the fretboard with all kinds of intricate patterns.

Anyways, I'm sure you guys the the idea. Looking forward to tapping your collective knowledge and hearing some feedback.
Last edited by NorthstrumGuita at Nov 9, 2016,
#2
Watch people use my ideas now lmao.. Or Ibanez or something lmao..

Have fun replicating the pattern on that body though lol.. It's actually a somewhat complicated process that requires some diy equipment.

I think the burn etched body and branded headstock will be the signature Northstrum look. The finish on the body will make it unique and instantly recognizable too
Last edited by NorthstrumGuita at Nov 9, 2016,
#3
Do a little research before you post, will you?
Wood burning (pyrography) has been around forever, but was very popular in the 1800's.

Google "Pyrography On Guitar Bodies" and then search "images" for hundreds (and perhaps thousands) of examples.
#4
Quote by NorthstrumGuita


A one piece hardtail mohagany 70s Strat, with a 30 SS jumbo fret 27" scale maple neck and ebony fretboard. Locking nut. Gotoh bridge. Dimarzio D Sonic in the bridge and something cleaner in the middle position.


Go back and read one of the other threads you've created and find my post regarding the amount of space you'll have between the 30th fret and the bridge for pickups. And learn how to spell mahogany correctly.

You realize you've already had two threads about this locked, right?
Last edited by dspellman at Nov 10, 2016,
#5
If you keep making threads on the same guitar because the previous ones got locked you will be banned. They were locked for a reason. When people explain to you how things work in reality, it doesn't do much for your credibility if you keep putting your fingers in your ears and chant the same spiel over and over because the advice you heard wasn't what you wanted to hear. We aim to give people honest advice on this forum. If you came here to have your feelings validated, leave. End of story.

Back on-topic, as dspellman said, you need to consider how you're going to package the pickup configuration in a guitar that has 30 frets. As for everything else, what kind of feedback are you looking for? The question of wanting any feedback is a very vague one indeeed.

Do you have any idea how much building this guitar is going to cost considering that you have no building experience, and therefore need to buy a ton of special tools needed to make building such a guitar possible. This guitar is going to be mighty expensive to make, mighty difficult and wrought with ways the build could can go wrong due to your lack of experience and foresight. If you need to ask questions on how to do this that and the other, and you're hopping around pie in the sky ideas like a flea on a hotplate, then it's pretty telling that you're very underprepared to undertake a project like this and that you have no idea what you're dealing with in my opinion.
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#6
I've seen a lot of engraved bodies, but I can't recall how many were merely engraved and how many used pyrography.

G&L did a limited run of 3-4 unique ones that did, as I recall. Blueberry does them.

See also per dspellman's suggestion:

https://www.google.com/search?q=guitar+pyrography&client=safari&hl=en-us&prmd=sivn&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwibgJbi5Z3QAhUK1CYKHSkEA90Q_AUICCgC
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!


alhaq369
It is very impotent to success a business.
#7
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE

Do you have any idea much building this guitar is going to cost considering that you have no guitar building experience, and therefore need to buy a ton of special tools needed to make building such a guitar possible. This guitar is going to be mighty expensive to make, mighty difficult and wrought with ways the build could can go wrong due to your lack of experience and foresight. If you need to ask questions on how to do this that and the other, and you're hopping around pie in the sky ideas like a flea on a hotplate, then it's pretty telling that you're very underprepared to undertake a project like this and that you have no idea what you're dealing with, in my opinion.


Good points. Perhaps practicing on an inexpensive wood like pine would be informative. Might even get actually usable results, like those old pine Teles.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!


alhaq369
It is very impotent to success a business.
#9
Yep.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!


alhaq369
It is very impotent to success a business.
#10
dspellman

This isn't pyrography though, I guess technically it might be but the pattern you see in the pic isn't done by hand. I'm also going to run it through a planer and sand the wood until the etching is flush with the surface of the wood, then I'm going with a dark or red stain.


Also, I already know this stuff can be done by hand, by what I want to do is engrave a metal branding plate and have the logo branded on instead. Much faster and more precise than freehand.
I think this would be a good way to make intricate patterns on the fretboard you , and I could possibly even make them into traditional pearl inlay or just leave it black.
#11
T00DEEPBLUE

Well I'm not too concerned with the build cost. I already own some tools and I've worked on guitars before. The most expensive piece of equipment I'll need is a bandsaw and a thickness planer. I'm looking at around 1500$ for both. The material for the build is going to cost me around 1000$, so all in all, not that expensive, although the additional cost of the tools does significantly raise the cost of production, which is why I'll be making more than one guitar.
#12
dspellman

I actually read that and was about to reply when the thread was locked. That was the most helpful reply I've received to date. I took a screenshot and noted all the information you gave me. You just contributed hard to the R&D of this guitar. I appreciate it a lot.

NorthstrumGuita
#13
T00DEEPBLUE

My claims regarding the tonal properties of wood aren't my own personal theories, and there are very credible people that agree. I can hear the differences too.

Dude, I'm going to do scientific testing to prove it once and for all. I'll show you the sound waves on a computer screen and show you how they're different. Some people can hear this subtle difference.
#14
dannyalcatraz

I've worked on guitars before.

As for getting " usable" results,

It's simple a matter of building the guitar to exact dimensions and doing everything accurately and precisely. It's all about attention to detail.
#15
slapsymcdougal

I'm not creating the pattern I showed you by hand either, nor lasers. It's being done in a rather unique way using microwaves. What I'm going to do is run the slab of wood through the thickness planer and sand it down so that the engraving is flush with the surface of the wood, and then stain.

Also, why would he put that pattern on the back of the neck? "looks like it'd just slow the neck down.
#16
Quote by NorthstrumGuita
slapsymcdougal

I'm not creating the pattern I showed you by hand either, nor lasers. It's being done in a rather unique way using microwaves. What I'm going to do is run the slab of wood through the thickness planer and sand it down so that the engraving is flush with the surface of the wood, and then stain.

Also, why would he put that pattern on the back of the neck? "looks like it'd just slow the neck down.
The definition of pyrography is decorating wood or other materials with burn marks.

You are using microwaves to burn the wood, hence what you are doing is pyrography.

And if you read the page, you'd know why it was done. I don't notice mine being faster or slower than any of my other guitars, which have a range of gloss, satin and oil finished necks, but what would I know, I've only had it for a year.
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#17
slapsymcdougal

I'd just assume that the pattern would grip more and that'd it eventually start to make your hand a little raw.
#18
Quote by NorthstrumGuita
slapsymcdougal

I'd just assume that the pattern would grip more and that'd it eventually start to make your hand a little raw.
Little tip, if you're holding a guitar neck that tightly, you're playing wrong.
Quote by Diemon Dave
Don't go ninjerin nobody don't need ninjerin'
#19
slapsymcdougal

It's not that I grip the neck tightly, it's more like I slide my hand up and down the neck pretty quickly and even on a smooth surface it starts to make my hand feel raw in between my thumb and index finger. I slide with an open hand so it's not that I'm griping it too tight.
#20
Quote by NorthstrumGuita
T00DEEPBLUE

My claims regarding the tonal properties of wood aren't my own personal theories, and there are very credible people that agree. I can hear the differences too.

Dude, I'm going to do scientific testing to prove it once and for all. I'll show you the sound waves on a computer screen and show you how they're different. Some people can hear this subtle difference.



You mean like this:

Still the difference to the human ear is negligable especially with overdrive or distorted sounds.
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

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Live my twisted dream
Pro devoted pledge
Time for primal concrete sledge

#21
Quote by NorthstrumGuita
slapsymcdougal

It's not that I grip the neck tightly, it's more like I slide my hand up and down the neck pretty quickly and even on a smooth surface it starts to make my hand feel raw in between my thumb and index finger. I slide with an open hand so it's not that I'm griping it too tight.



The purpose of the patterned neck is to eliminate the solid smooth surface that creates the friction the non etched part is what you touch so the etched parts create a break in the surface reducing the friction similar to how a satin finish neck feels slicker than a glossy one but improving on that.

FWIW I played on a used one at GC and it was great If I'd had the cash at the time I would have bought it.
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

Come and be with me
Live my twisted dream
Pro devoted pledge
Time for primal concrete sledge

#22
Evilnine

The less surface area making contact the less friction, ya, I guess that makes sense. I guess it's only a problem if you grip the neck too tightly like you were saying. I normally just sand the clear finish off the back of neck and I'm good.

I've also decided to change the name of my guitar from Northstrum to Norstrum. Just thought I'd add that in lol
#23
Quote by NorthstrumGuita
Evilnine

The less surface area making contact the less friction, ya, I guess that makes sense. I guess it's only a problem if you grip the neck too tightly like you were saying. I normally just sand the clear finish off the back of neck and I'm good.

I've also decided to change the name of my guitar from Northstrum to Norstrum. Just thought I'd add that in lol


FWIW using a scotchbrite pad on your neck is less damaging and will give that slick finish the what for, you will have to do it again from time to time as your playing will eventually bring back the gloss but it is way less harsh thand sanding the clear off completely.
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

Come and be with me
Live my twisted dream
Pro devoted pledge
Time for primal concrete sledge