#1
I am purchasing an Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plus Pro
All of these have coil tapping except for a Ltd Ed
Both cost same price: £399

The one I like because it has a 1960's Slim Taper neck: Epiphone Ltd Ed Les Paul Standard Plustop PRO in Bourbon Burst
However, this has Coil Splitting not Coil Tapping

I was hoping someone could tell me the difference, pros and cons

If its not worth getting coil splitting then I will forget the Ltd Ed one

Thanks
#2
Coil splitting basically cuts off one coil to achieve the single coil tone but defeats the noise cancelling benefit of a humbucker.

Coil tapping does not isolate one coil but uses both and retains the hum cancelling benefit while sounding like an SC.

http://jbepickups.com/coil-tapping-vs-coil-splitting/
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

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#3
Are you sure it's not just a mistake, since it's basically the same guitar? Actual coil taps are pretty rare. Usually you see them on single coil pickups where they have two different outputs - one for each "tap." Humbuckers almost always have coil splits, which is (as mentioned above) when you just turn off one coil so you end up with a sorta-kinda-single coil pickup. Thinking of guitars from the big manufacturers, it's probably 99-1 coil splits vs. taps. I couldn't name a single current production guitar with an actual coil tap, but lots of them have coil splits that are misidentified as taps.

Double check, but dollars to donuts on a production guitar it's a split and not a tap. It gets confused in marketing copy all the time. I bet it's the same exact guitar but with a different finish, as is common with Epiphone.
#4
^ +1
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#6
split was pretty unambiguous till the darn marketing departments got their hands on it...
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#7
Quote by Roc8995
Are you sure it's not just a mistake, since it's basically the same guitar? Actual coil taps are pretty rare. Usually you see them on single coil pickups where they have two different outputs - one for each "tap." Humbuckers almost always have coil splits, which is (as mentioned above) when you just turn off one coil so you end up with a sorta-kinda-single coil pickup. Thinking of guitars from the big manufacturers, it's probably 99-1 coil splits vs. taps. I couldn't name a single current production guitar with an actual coil tap, but lots of them have coil splits that are misidentified as taps.

Double check, but dollars to donuts on a production guitar it's a split and not a tap. It gets confused in marketing copy all the time. I bet it's the same exact guitar but with a different finish, as is common with Epiphone.
Yeah, coil tap as a term has come to mean, pretty much without exception, coil split. An actual coil tap, for OP's sake, is where you have a wire separating off part of a single coil so that you can use the entire coil or only part of it, allowing you to vary how over- or under-wound the pickup is, effectively. Series/parallel switching is another trick that can be done with humbuckers to get a brighter tone. I know of at least one Epi guitar with that feature, but I doubt the Les Paul does.
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#8
FWIW the Seymour Duncan Triple Shot pickup mounting rings for 4 wire humbuckers are awesome allowing you to switch from series to parallel or to isolate either coil.

I have a set on my V that is loaded with Wilde L500XLs and they work great I highly recommend them as a great way to to have options for your humbuckers that is a clean and totally reversable mod no need to drill holes or switch out your pots they are very stealthy.

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/accessories/seymour-duncan-ts-1s-triple-shot-flat-pickup-mounting-ring-set?rNtt=seymour duncan triple shot&index=1
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

Come and be with me
Live my twisted dream
Pro devoted pledge
Time for primal concrete sledge

#9
People (and marketing) tends to use the terms interchangeably, but they are very different sounds and they are achieved different ways. I'd rather just use the correct term for what we mean:
Coil splitting= shutting off one coil
Coil tapping= wiring a pickup, attaching an output wire, and then winding some more, attaching an output wire, etc. Not nearly as common, but cool sounds.
Dave @ Seymour Duncan
#10
I never knew what a coil tap was either until now.I did know that they're rare and are usually confused with coil splitting which I understand.