#1
So last week I bought an epiphone dot, because I've been playing lighter music recently, but I got the opportunity to interview for a fairly well known local band, that happens to play metal. It's this newer kind of stuff in B tuning and all. My question is, if I get thicker strings, can my dot handle this kind of music?
#2
Can it be done? Yes.

Is it ideal? No.
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alhaq369
It is very impotent to success a business.
#3
You can make a Dot play downtuned metal, but there's a long, long list of guitars that would be an awful lot more suitable.

The Dots are semi-hollows so they can viably play with more gain than fully hollow guitars without feeding back. With that said it will still be more feedback prone than most guitars.

The 24.75" scale is far from ideal for a whole lot of downtuning. The shorter scale means that you're going to want very heavy strings to tune down to B, even heavier than one usually would for B tuning. This is going to require you to recut the nut to get the strings to fit into the slots to minimize tuning problems. You may also have problems intonating a guitar that's using such a heavy gauge. The ABR-1 bridges on these guitars do not have a whole lot of intonation range and with such heavy strings, getting the guitar to intonate properly could be impossible without buying a new bridge. The third string may need to be substituted for a wound string rather than plain and this causes the intonation point of the string to move way upwards.

The pickups in a Dot are not exactly made for djent either.
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#4
^ Pretty much this^

A hollowbody will not be a good choice for downtuned high gain metal. Hollowbody guitars are prone to feedback when cranked with distrotion, always on the verge of feedback which ironically why Ted Nugent uses Gibson Byrdlands he likes the feedback factor but you have to know how to control it.

As much work as you are going to have to do to get that axe to be a decent metal guitar will not be worth it, short scale, hollow body, low output pick ups do not equal a metal guitar.

If you can afford to buy a used Ibanez, Jackson, LTD, Schecter etc. that is designed for metal, if you can't afford it and you are serious about this band you may have to consider trading in the Dot.
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#5
Quote by Kyyper
So last week I bought an epiphone dot, because I've been playing lighter music recently, but I got the opportunity to interview for a fairly well known local band, that happens to play metal. It's this newer kind of stuff in B tuning and all. My question is, if I get thicker strings, can my dot handle this kind of music?


It will handle it just better than racing a golf cart at the Indy 500.
You'd be better off with a long-scale solid body. I'd be looking at a 27 or 28.65" scale guitar for B tuning.
#6
My guess is if you show up with your plywood Dot chances are you'd be passed over the second they see you take it out of its cheap gig bag, Provided you even have a gig bag for it,
#7
Quote by nastytroll
My guess is if you show up with your plywood Dot chances are you'd be passed over the second they see you take it out of its cheap gig bag, Provided you even have a gig bag for it,


uncalled for play nice. not totally inaccurate though. I wouldn't take that guitar to an audition for a metal band with those requirements though as I doubt they'd even bother to hear you play.
#8
Quote by monwobobbo
uncalled for play nice. not totally inaccurate though. I wouldn't take that guitar to an audition for a metal band with those requirements though as I doubt they'd even bother to hear you play.


10-4 Just trying to keep the youngsters on the correct page, No harm intended, Like teaching your children not to show up at a gun fight with a knife, Hey If the kids from the SF Bay area I'll lend/sell him a metal shredder from hell, My kid doesn't play it anymore, Playing the blues and some kind of rockabilly funk fusion grunge crap these days, He's playing one of my old semi's and a few other relics last I checked, Seems that old crap is cool again,
#9
Quote by Kyyper
So last week I bought an epiphone dot, because I've been playing lighter music recently, but I got the opportunity to interview for a fairly well known local band, that happens to play metal. It's this newer kind of stuff in B tuning and all. My question is, if I get thicker strings, can my dot handle this kind of music?


What were you using before? What happened to that guitar? Can you borrow something?
#10
Quote by nastytroll
10-4 Just trying to keep the youngsters on the correct page, No harm intended, Like teaching your children not to show up at a gun fight with a knife, Hey If the kids from the SF Bay area I'll lend/sell him a metal shredder from hell, My kid doesn't play it anymore, Playing the blues and some kind of rockabilly funk fusion grunge crap these days, He's playing one of my old semi's and a few other relics last I checked, Seems that old crap is cool again,


wouldn't a better lesson to teach kids be to not be anywhere near a gun or knife fight? betting you've been in neither. grew up in the hood can assure you neither is fun.
#11
I'm by no means a guitar tech or expert, but I don't think a Dot is something to play metal with..
It looks like to me more like a guitar used for jazz or blues music
#12
Thanks for all the help, I can see this is not a good idea now. I'll keep the dot in standard and downtune my old beginner guitar, tho I'll probably have to abandon this project