#1
Hoi,

So I jog and cycle a lot during the summer. I usually cycle 40-60km depending on my mood and day. When it comes to jogging I usually go for 10km trips.

However I never really jogged during winter. When I started doing that I noticed that I find it almost impossible or at least extremely fatiguing to jog 10km during cold temperatures. At the moment it's about -15 celsius (sorry america) and I find distances that I used to jog with ease a lot harder. So I guess the cold temperatures "absorb' more energy than warmer temperatures?
#2
Quote by Billie_J
So I guess the cold temperatures "absorb' more energy than warmer temperatures?

Well, your body has to spend more energy trying to keep warm (though running definitely also contributes in that regard), so it's logical that you'd get tired earlier. You simply have less energy to spend on moving your muscles about.

That being said, I kinda enjoy cycling in the cold, even though I'm not as energetic during.
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#5
Yeah I absolutely cannot do that. Not because I get fatigued, but because my ears hurt and I get dizzy and disoriented as a result. I can use earmuffs or a hat down to 10 degrees Celsius but any lower than that they are pretty useless.
cat
#6
you should load up on calories because your body has to burn more to maintain your temperature
#9
Body has to waste more energy, plus the air pressure is much lower due to slowed air molecules, making it harder to breathe as well. Dress warm and work on your breathing and you will be fine, i have asthma and if i can do it you can (cross country runner).
#11
Breath through your nose more, and you might need to be wearing warmer clothes. You'll probably swear more but that's where polyester fabrics come in handy. You might need to slow your pace, or do a bit of a warm-up first too. I always like running in winter, less people out, nice snow and pink/purple sunrises.

Also, 10k is far enough that you may need to eat a bit more before you go, like half a bagel or something then wait a half hour. That should also help keep up your body temp.


"Every day I wonder how many things I am dead wrong about."
#13
Quote by Will Lane
better than jogging in the heat, welllol what
lol what? D:
#15
Why not start jogging shorter distances? 6-8km to start. You're obviously in pretty good shape if you regularly run 10km, so 6-8 in harsher climates should be easy.

When you run in lower temperatures, you burn more carbs for energy and less fat, socthat will drain your energy reserves quicker. Your core temperature may be up, but your muscle temperature won't be so your body has to adjust for that. Maybe try doing a good warm up inside before you leave to get temperature up.

To keep your body temp up, layering with multiple thinner layers is better than one thick layer as it traps warmer air in between acting as an insulator.
#16
Makes me cough if i jog in the cold
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#17
This is starting to remind me of my winter track days. Coach had me doing the 800 and then the 2 mile. It was total hell on my throat. Its what I assume a wood chipper feels like.
#18
Quote by Billie_J
Hoi,

So I jog and cycle a lot during the summer. I usually cycle 40-60km depending on my mood and day. When it comes to jogging I usually go for 10km trips.

However I never really jogged during winter. When I started doing that I noticed that I find it almost impossible or at least extremely fatiguing to jog 10km during cold temperatures. At the moment it's about -15 celsius (sorry america) and I find distances that I used to jog with ease a lot harder. So I guess the cold temperatures "absorb' more energy than warmer temperatures?


I run in the winter. There is definitely a difference in how you feel. I find that I end up doing more sprint oriented stuff or shorter distances. The cold air is definitely harder on your lungs, it is a slight shock to the system to be inhaling it at the rate you do when you run so your metabolism is going to be working harder than it normally would. That air also steals moisture, so you may find you get a bit dehydrated.

There's really no fix I know of but to embrace it. Run harder for shorter, that's what I've always done.

I always thought that lung-burn was pretty invigorating.

Quote by EyeNon15
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