#2
Tablature. If a guitarist knows how to read sheet music, it's not versatile if you are trying to play fast songs or technical songs. Plus it is hard for beginner guitarists to determine optimal fingerings when the song demands technicality.
#4
Tab first but a basic understanding of notation should be a priority after about a year's worth of playing ( to understand where the notes are and basic rythm subdivisions).

More important than both of those methods is learning by EAR - that is what makes a true musician
Last edited by reverb66 at Nov 12, 2016,
#7
I started on keys, so there wasn't an option of learning tabs. When I added guitar, there still weren't a lot of tabs for what I was playing, so I had to workout fingering on my own. Sheet music is instrumental (see what I did there) in learning music that hasn't been recorded, and that you can't listen to -- if you follow the sheet music, you play it as written, and it's correct. With only tab, you're only getting some fingering help.
#8
Most sheet music arranged for guitar at least has markings as to what string to play the note on, if not fingerings. Otherwise it's typically played in first position.
#9
Quote by cujohnston
Most sheet music arranged for guitar at least has markings as to what string to play the note on, if not fingerings. Otherwise it's typically played in first position.


Yeah this is true. I was always taught by my composition lecturers that if you wanted anything done specifically then it should be notated as such on the score.
#10
DrumL355Tabulature are good for learning. They do have some limitations and it will help if you are quite familiar with the song you are trying to learn, in order to get the timing of notes correct.

I gave up violin, because I couldn't figure out sheet music at all.
#12
If your new to music and guitar Tab is a good shortcut..if your getting serious about music and guitar..learn to read sheet music..as you advance..sheet music is like reading a book..tab is like looking at the pictures...
play well

wolf