#1
I have an MIC Epi LP Custom that I am slowly modding. First, I'm upgrading electronics (pots, pups, input jack, etc..). Will do that til end of this year.
Next thing I'm planning to do is to retrofit a robot tuner (g force, min e-tune).

Just wondering if some of you have done this already. I want to know if it was successful, what issues you encountered, etc. I'm not gonna do it personally, will bring it to a luthier.

I would appreciate any constructive thoughts/comments/tips/suggestions that you may have.

Thank you

-dok
#2
Seriously, just fit the min e tune yourself. It's basically lego.
Quote by Diemon Dave
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#3
The min-e tune is okay. If you're looking at doing drastic tuning changes or drop tunings the string tension can get a bit funny though. You can install it yourself as mentioned, there is no drilling or anything to get it installed. You just take your old ones off and put the new ones on.


Personally I just use traditional tuners. 0 problems with them and I don't have to worry about if my tuner batteries are charged.
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#4
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
The min-e tune is okay. If you're looking at doing drastic tuning changes or drop tunings the string tension can get a bit funny though. You can install it yourself as mentioned, there is no drilling or anything to get it installed. You just take your old ones off and put the new ones on.


Personally I just use traditional tuners. 0 problems with them and I don't have to worry about if my tuner batteries are charged.
Yea, it was designed so that pretty much anyone with better motor skills than a toddler can do it.
Quote by Diemon Dave
Don't go ninjerin nobody don't need ninjerin'
#5
The MinETune is a drop in IF your tuner holes match one of their pre-done templates. You'll want to work through that with Tronical (dot com), who actually manufacture the things.

It's unusual to find someone putting one INTO a guitar rather than removing it.

Here are some considerations.

It's easy to break the tuners.
It's easy to fool the tuning system if you're in a noisy environment (on a gig, etc.)
As the MinETune ages, it gets less accurate
You can break the tuners by having too heavy a string gauge on the guitar if you select some alternate tunings.
Alternate tunings are NOT where the unit shines; because it changes string tension to create the very limited number of alternate tunings available, you end up with some strings that are as tight as a cheese slicer and some that are floppy...within the same tuning. Difficult to predict what you can bend and what you can't. You'll learn.
All in all, it's best used just to tune your guitar to standard when it goes out of tune, and with common string gauges like 9's to 11's. You should be aware, however, that it's subject to the same glitches that any Les Paul tuners are -- the angle of the string leaving the nut can still cause you to have strings hung in the nut after a bend, pushing your guitar out of tune. No change there.
#6
Quote by dspellman
The MinETune is a drop in IF your tuner holes match one of their pre-done templates. You'll want to work through that with Tronical (dot com), who actually manufacture the things.

It's unusual to find someone putting one INTO a guitar rather than removing it.

Here are some considerations.

It's easy to break the tuners.
It's easy to fool the tuning system if you're in a noisy environment (on a gig, etc.)
As the MinETune ages, it gets less accurate
You can break the tuners by having too heavy a string gauge on the guitar if you select some alternate tunings.
Alternate tunings are NOT where the unit shines; because it changes string tension to create the very limited number of alternate tunings available, you end up with some strings that are as tight as a cheese slicer and some that are floppy...within the same tuning. Difficult to predict what you can bend and what you can't. You'll learn.
All in all, it's best used just to tune your guitar to standard when it goes out of tune, and with common string gauges like 9's to 11's. You should be aware, however, that it's subject to the same glitches that any Les Paul tuners are -- the angle of the string leaving the nut can still cause you to have strings hung in the nut after a bend, pushing your guitar out of tune. No change there.


Pretty sure the min-e tune is 10mm and Epiphones are drilled for that so hopefully he wont have problems.


Agreed about the rest though
Quote by Axelfox
my mom and i went to a furry con and on the second day she said she didn't come and pay money to go see dumb shit.


Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
#7
Yikes! too lazy to tune a guitar , That's just sad, If truly that lazy and wish to do your alternate tunings on the fly have you looked into the Roland GR-55? Set your patch stomp the box and your done, none of that tiresome fiddling with the guitars tuning heads, After all it is quite tedious and not worthy of your precious time,
Last edited by nastytroll at Nov 12, 2016,
#8
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
Pretty sure the min-e tune is 10mm and Epiphones are drilled for that so hopefully he wont have problems.


Agreed about the rest though
http://www.tronical.com/uploads/TronicalTune_PCB_Template.pdf

By the looks of things, the tuners are 8.6mm.
Quote by Diemon Dave
Don't go ninjerin nobody don't need ninjerin'
#9
I wouldn't recommend minetune for the reasons dspelmann explained. Its a system that seems to work well on paper, but in reality its fundamentally very flawed. There's actually only a couple of tunings you'll be able to tune to properly to until you'll need to change string gauge as the strings will either be like unplayable spaghetti or straight up break if you try anything else. The gears in those tuners are known to strip and break quite easily. Headstock tuners are not as accurate as electric chromatic tuners and they do not work in noisy environments like during a gig so half of the reason you'd ever want them is defeated. The minetune system will not help your guitar stay in tune any better than any standard set of tuners either. So if the strings are binding at the nut, don't expect the minetune system to make that problem magically go away.

A regular set of tuners that are properly strung and a Boss TU-3 or a TC Polytune on your pedalboard is going to be far more reliable. Caption Obvious states also that buying a pedal tuner means you aren't limited to tuning up just your Epi LP, but any guitar you've plugged the tuner into. But its your money at the end of the day.
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#10
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
Pretty sure the min-e tune is 10mm and Epiphones are drilled for that so hopefully he wont have problems.




The hole size itself isn't what I was referring to, but the spacing between them. The Tronical folks have a 47-page .pdf full of "standard" templates, in an ever-expanding series, for the metal plates that are required to hold the electronics and the tuners themselves. One issue that some have had fitting a TronicalTune (MinETune/GFarce) to a guitar that wasn't built with one is that there's sometimes variance in the spacing between holes drilled for individual tuners that prevents the plates from fitting correctly.