#1
I always see on here that I should find my own sound and such but I'm trying to learn a few Ratt songs to play at a party and I'd like to get as close as I can to Warren Demartini's sound. What I'm working with is a Gibson Les Paul with 490/JB and a peavy vypyr 30. I'm having a really hard time getting even close to his sound. I know that it's mainly in the fingers but if anyone has any advice on how to get as close as I can with this gear I'd really appreciate it!
#2
Get a better amp.

Warren Demartini uses Soldano SLO's, so without a stated budget, get one of those amps.
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#3
I really can't buy anything with the holidays and everything so what would you guys do with the set up I have? I know it's not ideal
#4
I'd set the Vypyr up to the 6505 setting, then put on a brave face and bear it until I can afford an upgrade. There's no a while lot else you can do.

You could be tempted buy distortion pedals. But in my opinion it's a pretty false economy as the good distortion pedals are really expensive and they solve a problem that a new amp would solve better. A distortion pedal can only sound as good as the amp it's plugged into.
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#6
I'd set them so it sounds good.

I know that isn't helpful. But the question you're asking (a common one that newbies ask) oversimplifies the problem to the point that the question is pointless.

There's zero rules when it comes to EQ because all amps react to EQ settings differently. The settings Warren Demartini has for his amps is going to be meaningless information to you because you do not have his setup. You are not going to have his exact amp and the exact same cabinet situated in the exact same location in the same room, in the same recording studio that he will have, with the same mixing engineer, the same pedals, the same guitar with the same fingers etc etc. All of those contextual factors are going to influence the way he is going to set the EQ and those factors are outside of your control. So setting your amps EQ the exact same way he does is never going to be representative of what he actually sounds like.

It's a bit like trying to get a Yugo to be as fast as a Lamborghini by asking how big the wheels on a Lambo are.
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#7
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE

You could be tempted buy distortion pedals. But in my opinion it's a pretty false economy as the good distortion pedals are really expensive and they solve a problem that a new amp would solve better. A distortion pedal can only sound as good as the amp it's plugged into.


i dunno about the good ones being necessarily expensive, but other than that i agree. also they don't always work well with modellers.

if there's a hot-rod marshally setting that might work well for earlier ratt. for george lynch again maybe a hot-rodded marshally setting. hard to suggest settings as toodeepblue said but i'd guess maybe go easy on the bass, fair bit of mids and a fair bit of treble. but it's very dependent on how your amp actually sounds (i realise that's no help and i can remember not having a clue about EQing and being told "EQ it to sound good" was zero help). Basically the bass is how tight your sound is (too much is muddy, but too little is too thin), the treble is how bright it is (too much is painfully trebly, not enough is too dark), and the mids are how scooped it is (too few mids and it'll be too scooped and disappear into the mix, but too much is too honky). set all the knobs half-way to start with and see how they sound- if the sound is too much or too little in any of those ways i described, then lower or raise the respective tone knob a bit and see if that helps.

maybe that will help a little.
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I saw in a couple of pictures that on Bucketheads Les Paul (only some pictures) that his neck pickup is painted in white. Can anyone explain to me why he would do this, and if there are any pros and cons.

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#8



sounds like typical hot rod Marshall.... Soldano type sound. I don't know the Vypyr, but it should have a JCM model, I would think. put an SD-1 or Super OD in front & you should be close enough to work out the EQ. easy on the bass, use the bridge pick up on the Les Paul.

p.s. just learning those chords & fills will get you closer than your EQ settings.
Last edited by RevBillyG at Nov 12, 2016,
#9
The 6505 setting on a Vypyr won't sound anything close.

I copped some decent 80s Marshall tones off my Vypyr 60 on the Brit setting. I think that one is based off a Vox AC30.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/0n7chg4rgk6m1uv/NAD%20test%205%20Brit%20model%20no%20boost.mp3?dl=0



I think the EQ was flat at 1 o'clock and so was the preamp gain IIRC. It's been awhile.

Generally setting the EQ controls at 12 noon is a good place to start when unsure.

Reverb and delay to taste. No pedals.

Humbucker bridge pup in a Strat type guitar will help but not required. Have fun and good luck.
Last edited by 311ZOSOVHJH at Nov 20, 2016,
#10
So the British version on my Vypyr would be my best bet? Some people are saying 6505 and some say British?
#11
Well,

At this point you are just going to have to try.

Tone and technique are subjective. I've never tried 80's rock with 6505 Green but I can see how that might work. I'm just saying I like the Brit setting on my Vypyr for that Ratt type crunch. I updated my link above because I realized it wasn't helpful. Set everything to 12 noon to start. Add a touch of reverb and delay to taste and give it a whirl.
#12
Quote by 311ZOSOVHJH
Well,

At this point you are just going to have to try.

Tone and technique are subjective. I've never tried 80's rock with 6505 Green but I can see how that might work. I'm just saying I like the Brit setting on my Vypyr for that Ratt type crunch. I updated my link above because I realized it wasn't helpful. Set everything to 12 noon to start. Add a touch of reverb and delay to taste and give it a whirl.


yeah trying is the only way to find out. OP hope by now you figured out that we can't just give you magic settings that will work every time. just doesn't work that way. if all it took was a strat plugged into a marshall to sound like Jimi Hendrix I assure you I'd have done it a long time ago. best way to learn is to experiment and work towards the goal you set. be prepared for the idea that you may never replicate either guys tone but may at least find some great ones to use anyways.