#1
I'm writing a song where towards the end I'm using an E chord that has both a perfect and an augmented fifth, and I think it sounds pretty neat. I'm just wondering what you would call that chord? Eaugadd12? Eaddb13?
#2
E(b6) would be the simplest name. And simple is usually best .
Only call it ""b13" if the chord has a 7th too.
#3
If it's an E major triad, it could just be a Cmaj7#5/E. But it really depends on the context. What voicing are you using and what chords come before and after it?
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#5
Well, an E major chord is common in A minor too...

It would help if you told us the voicing you are using and the chords that come before and after it.
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#7
Quote by benediktlange.lange
MaggaraMarine I use a Dm7 and an Am/E before it, and an Am after.

What voicing are you using for the chord in question?

But in this context I would say it's definitely an E major chord. The "b6" could just be some kind of a suspension. Not sure if I would analyze it as an actual chord tone.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
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Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#8
Am/E E Am is a common classical paradigm that can be analyzed as

V 6-5 i
  4-3

This suggests that the Am/E chord just prolongs the function of E major (dominant) in the function of A minor

These added tones are not always part of the actual chord. C over the E could be a suspension that anticipates the final Am chord.
#9
MaggaraMarine I use an E as the bass note, so if it's an Eb6 it would be in root position i guess. This specific chord is used as the second to last chord in the song and it's just strummed. In the rest of the song I'm just using a regular E#5 before the Am.
#10
Quote by benediktlange.lange
MaggaraMarine I use an E as the bass note, so if it's an Eb6 it would be in root position i guess. This specific chord is used as the second to last chord in the song and it's just strummed. In the rest of the song I'm just using a regular E#5 before the Am.
E(b6), not "Eb6". Eb6 means an Eb major chord with a 6th added: Eb-G-Bb-C. I.e., you need the parentheses to separate the "b" from the "E".
MM is right that Cmaj7#/E could be the best name - even if it is on the long side - but are you putting the C above the B, or vice versa? Doesn't make a lot (if any) of difference to the chord name, but quite a lot to how it sounds.

E.g., the 2nd chord in Stairway to Heaven is Cmaj7#5/G#: x-x-6-5-5-7. Sounds good because the B is above the C. And also because the G# is in the middle of a descending bass line. Put the C above the B (octave and a half-step) and you have the classic jazz "avoid note": a b9 interval that they try to avoid in any chord voicing (other than a 7b9). If you voice it so the C is just a half-step above (quite easy on guitar thanks to the open B), that's a less problematic dissonance, and quite common in plain Cmaj7 voicings.
Naturally, you don't have to set any store by jazz convention - and any dissonance is OK if it's soon resolved. I'm just saying these kind of intervals (sometimes hidden in some chord shapes) are worth listening out for, and making sure you like them, and that they work in context.
Last edited by jongtr at Nov 14, 2016,
#11
jongtrI think E(b6) is the best name for this chord, as it's supposed to lead up to the Am, which is something that a regular E major does as well, but if I changed the chord to a C major it would sound entirely different.
I'm playing it like 0-7-6-5-0-0, so the B is above the C. Thanks for the ellaboration, I appreciate that.
#12
Quote by benediktlange.lange
jongtrI think E(b6) is the best name for this chord, as it's supposed to lead up to the Am, which is something that a regular E major does as well, but if I changed the chord to a C major it would sound entirely different.
I'm playing it like 0-7-6-5-0-0, so the B is above the C. Thanks for the ellaboration, I appreciate that.
Gotcha. I guessed it might be that shape.
The B-C minor 2nd is a nice dissonance - makes the chord a little ambiguous, but that's only a problem for naming it! Not for using it.
The E is certainly a much stronger root acoustically than the C, partly because there's three E's (and one of them is low), but also because the E is supported by its perfect 5th, B. The three major 3rds in the chord (E-G#, G#-C* and C-E) then kind of cancel each other out. C is the root of C-E, but that's overwhelmed by all the "E-rootness" elsewhere.

(*Theory note for pedants: G#-C is of course a "diminished 4th". Ab-C would be a major 3rd. You know what I mean, guys... )
Last edited by jongtr at Nov 14, 2016,
#13
E E G# C B E
Quote by jongtr
The E is certainly a much stronger root acoustically than the C,
What else is there in determining the root of a chord if not acoustically??
Si
#14
Quote by 20Tigers
E E G# C B E What else is there in determining the root of a chord if not acoustically??
Context?
Personally I go with acoustic where possible, but occasionally - I guess - context might trump it. (Whoops I used a bad word... )

After all, the acoustic root of a stack of notes is often ambiguous. Context might suggest one root over the other possibilities.
Last edited by jongtr at Nov 15, 2016,
#15
I forgot I typed out the chord voicing. haha!! I was staring at your quote thinking...where did that first part come from?

Context is vital. But it just provides more information for the acoustic interpretation :P

i.e. context can change what we hear as the root of a chord, and that's what determines the root of a chord. To me that's what I thought you meant by "acoustically"
Si
#16
Quote by 20Tigers
I forgot I typed out the chord voicing. haha!! I was staring at your quote thinking...where did that first part come from?

Context is vital. But it just provides more information for the acoustic interpretation :P

i.e. context can change what we hear as the root of a chord, and that's what determines the root of a chord. To me that's what I thought you meant by "acoustically"
Agreed - mostly! I.e., context is rarely "vital" for naming a chord. But it does make a difference if the chord is in any way ambiguous (acoustically on its own).
I mean "context" in the sense of chords (or other musical clues) either side, btw. Not simultaneous context (such as notes played at the same time by another instrument). So if a guitarist was playing that E E G# C B E chord, while a bass player was hammering out a C note, I'd call it Cmaj7#5. That's because the bass note is not just some peripheral "context" - it's a fundamental (literally!) part of the chord. If the bass player was playing A, that would turn it into "Am(maj9)".

After all, it's common in bands (especially in jazz) to play rootless chord voicings which (on their own) resemble other chords, trusting a bass player to provide the root. But we know the chord doesn't change. If we play an Em shape over a C bass, we know the chord is not "Em", even though it looks (and feels) like that - it's Cmaj7, and we're just playing part of it.
Last edited by jongtr at Nov 18, 2016,
#17
What these geniuses said.

It's most likely E(add b6).

It could also be Cmaj7#5/E, but that's definitely a less common move outside of jazz and classical circles.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

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#18
QUOTE=Jet Penguin]What these geniuses said.

It's most likely E(add b6).

why is it an "ADD" b6th? just be a b6th not skipping any intervals unless its an ADD b13th extended chord tone.

anyhow you don't put 2 intervals that are the same in naming chords if it has a 5th and a b6th/add b13th
you don't call it a #5th cause it already contains a 5th. although its a free world name it whatever you like if they know chords they will get the point
just give you a weird look like :-/
#19
Quote by gocosfs
Quote by Jet Penguin
What these geniuses said.

It's most likely E(add b6).


why is it an "ADD" b6th? just be a b6th not skipping any intervals
I agree "E(b6)" ought to be enough, but I guess the issue could be a possible confusion with "Eb6" - at least verbally!
I.e., - "No, it's an E brackets flat 6 close brackets!"
Last edited by jongtr at Nov 21, 2016,