#1
Played a 2016 SG, the first SG I ever played to further note! Loved it! I maybe looking to get one but. Im not a fan of the clear coat rosewood fret board, it was a faded SG not a standard. Does Gibson make any I guess "plain" rosewood fretboards for SGs? Thanks!
'15 Fender Stratocaster w/ Dimarzio p/u
'15 Squire Bullet Stratocaster w/ Dimarzio p/u
Marshall DSL40c
#2
What do you mean by clear coat? I've never seen an SG with a different type of fretboard than say a Les Paul.
#3
It was almost like a polyurethane coat over the frets, I've done some research an I guess the correct terminology is baked? It was like a glaze
'15 Fender Stratocaster w/ Dimarzio p/u
'15 Squire Bullet Stratocaster w/ Dimarzio p/u
Marshall DSL40c
#4
Again, it was new. It caught me off guard when I ran my fingers along the frets and it felt smooth, definitely had a coat of something over the wood. I like the feel of actual rosewood, the sg was perfect other than the lacquer or poly over the wood ? this is all new for me so if its normal I wouldn't know, maybe a older SG would have that worn off?
'15 Fender Stratocaster w/ Dimarzio p/u
'15 Squire Bullet Stratocaster w/ Dimarzio p/u
Marshall DSL40c
#5
It could be something new they're doing. I haven't played one that had a coating, unless all of the rosewood boards on any brand I've ever played have had a coating.

Could it have been something like an aftermarket product that was rubbed on? My SG has a bit of a coated feel right after I've used lemon oil on it, but that's gone the next day / when it's completely soaked in.
#6
Quote by VirgoLife87
Again, it was new. It caught me off guard when I ran my fingers along the frets and it felt smooth, definitely had a coat of something over the wood. I like the feel of actual rosewood, the sg was perfect other than the lacquer or poly over the wood ? this is all new for me so if its normal I wouldn't know, maybe a older SG would have that worn off?


There's no lacquer or poly over the rosewood on a Gibson guitar. Period.

Nor is it "baked." Maple is sometimes baked/roasted ("torrified" is the real term), to darken and/or stabliize it, but there's no point in doing that for rosewood. I don't know what "research" you may be referring to.

There may be a bit of wax on it, but that would be about it.

Epiphones sometimes have a coat of a waxy substance on new guitars that most folks either leave alone or scrape off with a credit card.

Are you sure it was rosewood?
#8
Gibson has never done such a thing to their guitars so I have no idea what you're talking about.
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