#1
Hello! I've been playing guitar on and off since grade 6 (in second year of university now). Due to a lack of motivation, and a poor teacher (She is good with classical instruments, but not with guitar, I didn't learn any scales, I didn't even really know about alternative picking), I switched to a different teacher (via a music school (The Arts Music Store)). While I was there I learned a lot about different aspects of playing guitar, but I then had to quit due to moving downtown for university. The only thing that I am going off of right now is a game called. "Rocksmith 2014 " which I picked up at Christmas and I'm enjoying it quite a bit. My question is, what are some good tools/websites/(or in game Rocksmith utilities) can I use to help learn different scales, techniques, chords, theory, etc? Thanks in advance!!
-Rob
Last edited by Dj_Hero_pRo at Nov 15, 2016,
#2
Best thing you can do is organize your time and stick to a routine. Kinda dull, but it pays off.

The most generic structure is to do warmups/technique, new music, then old music. How you break those down is a matter of your own priorities. Without a teacher your best bet is probably to get a beginner book and just work through it page by page. It sounds like you're not a total beginner, but a bit of remediation will fill in whatever gaps you might have at that level and prepare you for intermediate material.
#3
Dj_Hero_pRo
Quote by Dj_Hero_pRo
Hello! I've been playing guitar on and off since grade 6 (in second year of university now). Due to a lack of motivation, and a poor teacher (She is good with classical instruments, but not with guitar, I didn't learn any scales, I didn't even really know about alternative picking), I switched to a different teacher (via a music school (The Arts Music Store)). While I was there I learned a lot about different aspects of playing guitar, but I then had to quit due to moving downtown for university. The only thing that I am going off of right now is a game called. "Rocksmith 2014 " which I picked up at Christmas and I'm enjoying it quite a bit. My question is, what are some good tools/websites/(or in game Rocksmith utilities) can I use to help learn different scales, techniques, chords, theory, etc? Thanks in advance!!
-Rob


1) Technique - check out John Petrucci's "Rock Discipline" video - you can find it anywhere - it covers every rock technique - it's especially good for scale exercises and arpeggios - a lot of good basic content there.

2) scales/chord theory - start with the C major scale and A minor scale - then learn E minor and G major. look up individual lessons online or you tube videos discussing the major scale, it's construction , intervals, and modes. learn what the harmonized major scale is and what that means - that alone will take a lot of time but it will get you started. Learn how chords are named in relation to the intervals of the major scale. Pro tip - when practicing scales - always play the chord first - then the scale- so if you're going to practice C major scale - play a Cmajor chord then play the scale- it will help you hear the scale better. It's also a good idea to practice your scale over a recorded vamp using only one chord - so record yourself strumming a C chord and play the scale over that - it will help you hear the intervals.

3) try learning songs that incorporate the scales or chords or technique you are learning, otherwise you are wasting your time - it's ABSOLUTELY VITAL to reinforce techniques and scales with actual musical examples using them - for example, if you learn the C major scale - learn a solo from a song that uses it so you can see how it's used in the real world and it will help your brain wrap around the concept. You can easily research which songs are in what key or even just start a thread for examples of songs with solos in a given scale.
#4
I think I have seen phones apps that teach scales. There are always the books, DVDs etc. I learn scales by sheer repetition from finding the one I want to learn from some random website, but I'm not going to claim that its particularly interesting to continually play the scale up and down, back to front, upside down and inside out - until I can play solos using it without needing to think where the next note will be.