#1
Pretty noob question, but what does a noise gate do?
Does it actually remove unwanted noise from a signal entirely? I've always just assumed it basically mutes the background hum, then once you strum, all that noise flows through behind the guitar.
Think there's any benefit to running a noise gate before plugging into an interface for recording?
#2
Quote by Frankieanime78
(a) I've always just assumed it basically mutes the background hum, then once you strum, all that noise flows through behind the guitar.
(b) Think there's any benefit to running a noise gate before plugging into an interface for recording?


(a) it depends on the exact pedal but yeah in general that's what happens

(b) no idea, i don't use interfaces or record really
Quote by crownegamers
I saw in a couple of pictures that on Bucketheads Les Paul (only some pictures) that his neck pickup is painted in white. Can anyone explain to me why he would do this, and if there are any pros and cons.

Quote by dspellman
The guy wears a KFC Bucket and a white mask during performances, and you're interested in the color of his pickup covers?

#3
One drawback to a gate is reduced sustain. Instead of holding a note/chord until it fades, it will reach a point where it breaks up and then goes immediately dead.
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#4
If you're being specific (noise gate is sometimes used as quite a broad term for noise reducing pedals, but usually it's this), a noise gate is a pedal that completely kills the signal when it falls below a certain threshold. So you set that to be just above the level of your background hum or whatever you're picking up and everything is silent until you play. When you're playing, the signal level goes above that level and the noise gate stops acting on the signal at all, until it falls below the set threshold again. As has been pointed out, that does mean that notes left open won't die out naturally, but will cut off at a certain point, sometimes faltering and coming back for a second or weird things like that. In many cases that may not be a problem, and in a few cases (i.e. certain chuggy riffing styles) it may be an advantage. For some, it's a big problem, and I find that a gated signal can be very unforgiving to play with as a dud note is immediately cut off to silence.

There's a benefit to it if you're getting background hum, though it might not be the only way to deal with your problem. I think with recording there are often more effective ways to reduce noise.
#5
Some of the fancier pedals go in front and in the loop and are smart enough to block just the noise - or at least block input and loop noise. Thinking of the ISP G-String II.

With high gain amps like the Peavey 5150/6505 noise gates allow you to keep your sanity while not playing and you can't hear the hum over the distortion.
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#6
Take a look at the ISP Decimater ProRack G (which has two channels of noise reduction). One channel eliminates noise in the guitar's original signal, and eliminates noise picked up by the guitar, such as 50 or 60 cycle hum, buzz, stage light noise, etc. The second channel uses your FX channel and the original guitar signal from channel one to eliminate high-gain preamplifier noise from the high-gain guitar signal. Because it uses the original signal as a comparison, it's better able to detect what's noise and what's not in a high-gain environment. This is probably the best gig-rig setup you can find (and there is a pedal version that has two channels as well). Beyond this, you're well into some seriously expensive studio rack pieces.
#7
I might be way off, but I don't think there is any pedal that will actually cut out noise while you're playing. Any hiss or hum will be introduced back into your tone once you start playing and the gate disengages, but that usually only occurs with high gain and is usually unnoticeable. Altering your signal to completely eliminate any noise seems like it would change the tone.

If I'm wrong, correct me. That'd be a pretty sweet pedal.
#8
Quote by Ignite
I might be way off, but I don't think there is any pedal that will actually cut out noise while you're playing. Any hiss or hum will be introduced back into your tone once you start playing and the gate disengages, but that usually only occurs with high gain and is usually unnoticeable. Altering your signal to completely eliminate any noise seems like it would change the tone.

If I'm wrong, correct me. That'd be a pretty sweet pedal.


I only use a gate for chunking high gain metal riffs to cut them off sharp and keep the chugging from mushing into a big mess and keep the threshold set to choke my chords quickly. I have a Boss NS-2 noise supressor and here is what Boss claims: "The NS-2 effectively eliminates noise and hum of the input signal while preserving the original sound's tonality. The natural attack and envelope are unaffected thanks to the NS-2's unique noise detection circuit that precisely separates the guitar sound and the noise components".
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Last edited by Evilnine at Nov 16, 2016,
#9
I have a ns-2 as well, and i was never really happy with it, no matter how much i tweaked it. Maybe im just incompetent. But now i use the built in noisegate on my Powerball and it works way better.
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#10
^ did you try the x-pattern method? i thought mine was crap till i tried that and once i did i had to admit that, while i preferred the decimator, the ns2 would definitely do the job, especially if you needed to cut noise both in front of the amp and in the loop as well where you have to buy the g-string decimator for that (or just two decimators) which is crazy expensive.

that being said i always found one single decimator in the loop actually cut noise pretty effectively anyway, so...
Quote by crownegamers
I saw in a couple of pictures that on Bucketheads Les Paul (only some pictures) that his neck pickup is painted in white. Can anyone explain to me why he would do this, and if there are any pros and cons.

Quote by dspellman
The guy wears a KFC Bucket and a white mask during performances, and you're interested in the color of his pickup covers?

#11
It occurs to me if you set the threshold very high, you'd get a very choppy output as the result.

...which could be interesting.
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#12
Quote by dannyalcatraz
It occurs to me if you set the threshold very high, you'd get a very choppy output as the result.

...which could be interesting.
I think that's more or less the rationale behind some of the angrier fuzzes around.
#13
Maybe, but if you used a high threshhold even with non-fuzz/OD saturated sounds...

I don't know. I don't have any noise gates on anything but fuzzes or ODs, and I never use them. (The noise gates, that is.)
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!


alhaq369
It is very impotent to success a business.
#14
Quote by Dave_Mc
^ did you try the x-pattern method? i thought mine was crap till i tried that and once i did i had to admit that, while i preferred the decimator, the ns2 would definitely do the job, especially if you needed to cut noise both in front of the amp and in the loop as well where you have to buy the g-string decimator for that (or just two decimators) which is crazy expensive.

that being said i always found one single decimator in the loop actually cut noise pretty effectively anyway, so...


I did actually. I just never got it to where i wanted it. The builtin one that i use now is not perfect by any means, but its still better for me than the ns-2.

On a completely unrelated note, i am selling a Boss NS-2, does anybody want it?
Joža je kul. On ma sirove z dodatki pa hambije.
#15
ah right, no worries. i guess i should stop assuming everyone's as ill-informed as i am

i have one too in a box
Quote by crownegamers
I saw in a couple of pictures that on Bucketheads Les Paul (only some pictures) that his neck pickup is painted in white. Can anyone explain to me why he would do this, and if there are any pros and cons.

Quote by dspellman
The guy wears a KFC Bucket and a white mask during performances, and you're interested in the color of his pickup covers?