#1
So I recently traded my bass for an Epiphone SG Special, and it's really beat up. It was a friends old guitar which he used to mess around with, so its road worn, different colors of red and the epiphone headshot is scratched up. My mum wont let me get a paint job because she thinks it will be too expensive. I also have no knowledge of painting nor removing hardware because I am a beginner guitarist. Is that anything I can do without removing hardware and paint + a brush or something?


thanks for any help
#2
Its also got like deep cuts of words like Z A M really distorted and like cut in with like a knife or something, literally dug into the wood
#3
There's nothing you can do about the damage to the body and the finish if you're not being allowed to work on it. You can't even clean the guitar properly without removing the hardware.

What's stopping you from removing the hardware? Just take off the strings and start taking the guitar apart. Unless for some reason you've never held a screwdriver in your life, the way these guitars come apart is very simple and self-explanatory. To reassemble the guitar, just put everything back on the way it came off.
Quote by Axelfox
Please understand how little we as a community care
#4
No its just that I don't want to really do any damage to the hardware, ive got the strings off. i also dont think that my dad has the sufficient workshop tools to work on.
#5
You aren't going to do any damage to the hardware if you exercise common sense. Just don't overtighten anything such as the nuts which mount the tuners to the headstock and you'll be fine. They don't need to be too tight.

The only things you need to take these guitars apart are some wire cutters to take the strings off, a small Phillips screwdriver, a small flathead screwdriver and an adjustable spanner. That's it. If your dad doesn't have any of those things then its time for him to buy them because they're absolutely essential tools for working on just about anything.

It's also essential to get a few metric Allen wrenches (if you don't have any) so that you can adjust the guitar's truss rod when doing a set up. I think Epiphones use either a 4mm or 5mm, I don't remember. Buy both sizes, they're dirt cheap.
Quote by Axelfox
Please understand how little we as a community care
#6
Quote by thevultures
So I recently traded my bass for an Epiphone SG Special, and it's really beat up. It was a friends old guitar which he used to mess around with, so its road worn, different colors of red and the epiphone headshot is scratched up. My mum wont let me get a paint job because she thinks it will be too expensive. I also have no knowledge of painting nor removing hardware because I am a beginner guitarist. Is that anything I can do without removing hardware and paint + a brush or something?


Removing hardware isn't a big deal, and you'll want to learn how to do that anyway.
For now, I'd suggest just filling the deepest dings and scratches and get the surface smooth. Then contact one of the places that does vinyl wraps for guitars. Google is your friend, but they'll be something like Axe Wraps, etc. A transit vinyl wrap for your guitar (you really only need to do the front, but you can wrap the whole thing) will last you longer than you think, will preserve the surfaces under the wrap (it peels off) and it's relatively inexpensive (maybe $35) and you'll look like you have a new guitar. You'll want the hardware off the guitar when you put the wrap on anyway. You can remove the graphic later (no damage to the underlying finish) and swap it out as often as you like. Some are extremely graphical, some look like quilted maple finishes, etc.

Try googling "guitar graphics vinyl wrap"
#7
My first guitar was a pretty chipped up Peavey Predator in bright red. I went to the auto parts store and found that GM Victory Red was a pretty close match for the original color. I bought the little bottle of touch-up paint they sell for cars and used that to paint over the chipped areas. Up close, you can still see where it was chipped, but from a few feet away it looks pretty OK. I just used the same trick on a Peavey Foundation bass that had lots of chips in the black paint around the periphery of the body. GM Universal Black was a close enough shade that made it look quite a bit better. While this trick won't work for a natural wood finish, it's a cheap way to make a crappy looking guitar look a little more presentable.

BTW, what gave me the idea of looking in the auto parts store was learning that in the 60's, Fender offered their guitar in standard colors, plus whatever paint was currently sold by DuPont automotive finishes.
#9
im just gonna smother it in cheap paint and call her "Artsy"


ez solution
2ez4rtz