#1
I've got a Fender classical guitar which is perhaps not their finest instrument ever but is quite nice.

The machines maybe are past their best and I'm thinking of replacing them.

I don't want real cheapies, but don't want to go OTT either.

What might be appropriate ones to fit?
#2
Machine heads are a pretty standard size these days. Most sites have diagrams with sizes so you can check against the guitar you have. The screw holes for attaching to the side of the headstock might be in different places but you can always drill new holes.
#3
Thanks for that; I was vaguely hoping for some brand advice.
Are the cheapies any good?, are there any to avoid?, are the Gotoh ones OK?, is the FC-10 just junk so don't bother, anything really...
#4
The Fender FC10 is a cheap and cheerful guitar but if you like the way it plays and sounds that's great. I've used a set of machineheads costing less than £10 on a classical and the they were fine.
#5
Thanks.
It's a nice sounding guitar; I got it for nothing on freecycle, so can't complain!
The intonation on one of the strings is way out, for some reason though; I might try a different brand of strings next time around.
#6
Quote by prowla
Thanks.
It's a nice sounding guitar; I got it for nothing on freecycle, so can't complain!
The intonation on one of the strings is way out, for some reason though; I might try a different brand of strings next time around.


The G string?
#7
Yep - the G is particularly bad.

The bridge saddle is just a single straight line, slightly diagonal.
#8
Quote by prowla
Yep - the G is particularly bad.

The bridge saddle is just a single straight line, slightly diagonal.


OK - the G string is usually the problematic one on a classical. You can buy a saddle that is compensated to improve intonation of the G string.
Last edited by Garthman at Nov 22, 2016,
#9
I looked again and my bridge is just straight across.

I'll have to have a look at that, thanks!

I reckon the G is probably a quarter tone out, so the thing is unplayable at the 12th fret, really.
#10
Intonation is always just approximate on an acoustic guitar (and, indeed, all fretted instruments). The intonation usually goes out as youmoev up the fretboard and the mere act of fretting a string can affect the intonation.

A compensated saddle will help if you are using a monofilament (standard) G string. Another option is to use a wound G string - that will probably sort the problem.
#11
Thanks for the good advice!
(Yes, the G string is just a plain one - will try wound next time...)