#1
Ok, I'm looking into recording some music of my own. I'm gonna play all of the parts myself, and have the equipment needed to do this. All that's missing is the recording gear. I do have a pc and / or laptop and I can acquire the software. What I'm iffy on is the equipment needed. I do know I want at least 8 tracks / inputs with USB support. My budget for an interface or DAW and condenser mic is arounbd $350. Do I need a DAW (digital audio workstation), or a digital audio interface? What is the difference? And what software would you guys that are knowledgeable reccomend? Thanks, everyone.
#3
If you are playing everything yourself one track at a time, you don't need an 8 input interface. You just need an interface that accepts one or two mic inputs. The number of tracks you can record will be determined by your software though most recording software offers a huge number of tracks, more than most people can possibly fill. You will need to examine your computer/laptop to see how much ram you will need for your software and how much processing speed your computer has. Find out what your computer can handle then do some shopping on line for recording software that matches your computers resources and your wallets contents.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Nov 18, 2016,
#4
Quote by bogginhead
Ok, I'm looking into recording some music of my own. I'm gonna play all of the parts myself, and have the equipment needed to do this. All that's missing is the recording gear. I do have a pc and / or laptop and I can acquire the software. What I'm iffy on is the equipment needed. I do know I want at least 8 tracks / inputs with USB support. My budget for an interface or DAW and condenser mic is arounbd $350. Do I need a DAW (digital audio workstation), or a digital audio interface? What is the difference? And what software would you guys that are knowledgeable reccomend? Thanks, everyone.
You want software that plays at least 8 tracks, or do you want something that can process at least 8 inputs? Most DAWs can play quite a lot of tracks, no worries there. The interface is the tricky part. The DAW is where the tracks are recorded to on your computer and where you do your editing. The Audio Interface is what converts the analog signal of a microphone or guitar or whatever, into a digital signal that your computer can work with. You need BOTH. If you want to track drums and you want to mic EVERYTHING, then yes you will need a lot of inputs from the Interface. One mic/input for the snare, another for the kick, a few OH condensers, toms, etc.

You may be better off getting a smaller Interface for the time being, rather than spending big bucks now, since you are just learning. You can effectively record drums with just two inputs, one condenser overhead and one kick drum mic. It is not the most ideal but it will definitely get you usable results. Another option is to get a small, compact sub mixer that has 8 inputs, mix your drums there, then send that signal to the Audio Interface. Either way, you would need mics for every source there and in your budget, including the DAW and Interface, even if you cheap out I do not think you will cut it.

Two solid 2-input interfaces are the Mackie Onyx Blackjack and the Focusrite 2i4. The MOB is a bit less expensive than the Focusrite, although the Focusrite has decibel-reducing pads (which you may need if you are recording very high volume sources, although the MOB has a lot of headroom) and MIDI support. As said above, Reaper is the go-to beginner DAW. I get usable results with Audacity, which is free, but you have to know how to mix with your eyes. You will only have around $150 for a condenser mic, I asked about budget condensers a while ago, check out the thread here. I would not want to use a condenser on a kick drum, so you may want to take into account a mic for that as well.

Check out the Introduction to Recording Thread if you haven't, it will help you out a lot.
Last edited by Will Lane at Nov 18, 2016,
#5
I use Ableton Live to record and EQ my recording it is very easy to use. I got ableton Live intro for free with the purchase on their midi controller called Ableton Push. Reaper is also really good.
#6
Thanks for your help, guys. So something like the Tascam DP 03SD really isn't worth looking into? Just go for a good interface, condenser, and software?
#7
Quote by bogginhead
Thanks for your help, guys. So something like the Tascam DP 03SD really isn't worth looking into? Just go for a good interface, condenser, and software?
Well it would work, but I prefer to have the audio work done on a computer (laptop, desktop) myself, rather than everything being contained in one unit. For the price of that you could get the Mackie Onyx Blackjack or Focusrite 2i2 and Reaper, and still have some money left over.
#8
Quote by bogginhead
Thanks for your help, guys. So something like the Tascam DP 03SD really isn't worth looking into?


That is an all in one unit, it really depends, how bogged down in software and PC you want to get also how involved in the editing, etc.
The standalone units are usually more intuitive and more stable than the software setup, plus you won't have to think of how to install your drivers, etc. in case things don't work out. On the other hand, you're giving away some editing and the option to use the software processing.

It is really up to you, either in the box or out of the box, both methods work.

I think the main issue is to figure out exactly what your budget is and what are you looking to achieve.
If you want a multimic setup to record drums and a full band, you'd need to decide how many tracks you want to record at the same time. If you'd be overdubbing, you usually need less track at once recording capability, etc.

This would be a good start:
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1658707