#1
Hey everyone!

Bet, you’ve noticed that we have a new layout for news and lessons (reviews next), and with a new layout, we want to get user generated content back. We have some guest articles to share tips and tricks, however, I think that not only bloggers have something to write about.

Our Forum is a gold mine and there are tons of helpful and useful information. Let’s accessible from our news or lessons sections =)

The idea is to have a rubric something like ”Golden advice by UG Community” where you (mean niche forums) can publish your Top tips/guitars/amps/etc.
My idea was to have a thread where we can decide 1. what to write about and 2. discuss if certain advice is useful and helpful.

Finally, we come up with a text to feature on UG (and Facebook) and, ideally, it will be Electric Guitar forum users generated article.

Let me know what do yo think about it!
#2
Should be helpful, and will give us a standard thread to point new users to for a lot of the typical questions we see that we answer over and over again.

I don't know how many times I've seen things like "how do I improve my speed?" or "what kind of practice routine do I need?" I just answered a variation of that...How to practice problem parts of a song.

Many of those could be handled just by posting a link to a sticky with advice pertaining to that general question.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#3
Alright, I'll take a shot at it, here are 10 tips:


1) Take the time to learn how to properly setup and intonate your own guitars. That way you save yourself from having to pay a guitar tech every time you need an adjustment.

2) If you are budgeting around buying a guitar and amp at the same time, don't cheap out on your amplifier. While it might be tempting to splurge your budget on a nice Gibson, your amp plays a bigger part in your overall sound and you will benefit by spending a bit more on one.

3) If you find your toggle switches, pots or jacks aren't functioning as they should, try hitting them with contact cleaner before you take it to a tech. You might find that after a cleaning, your parts are working properly again!

4) String your guitar properly! Sometimes that odd buzz that you can't fix can be caused by poor stringing technique!

5) String winders are your friend.

6) Tight knob that won't come off the pot? Wrap a shoe lace or a guitar rag under the knob and slowly pull it upwards to remove it.

7) If you are using a tube amp and changing power tubes, make sure you know if your amp needs to be biased. Generally fixed-bias amps need to be adjusted periodically and with new tubes and cathode biased amps are "self-biasing".

8) If your amp is a head and cabinet, make sure you match the impedance of the head to the cabinet and make sure the cabinet has sufficient wattage to support the wattage of your head. If you dont, you might end up damaging your amp!

9) Want to get better? Practice, practice, practice...

10) Gear taste and tone are subjective. Don't forget it
Quote by Axelfox
my mom and i went to a furry con and on the second day she said she didn't come and pay money to go see dumb shit.


Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
Last edited by H4T3BR33D3R at Nov 22, 2016,
#4
I suppose I should bite.

Truss rod tips:

1. To check your neck relief, place a capo on the first fret of any string (the lowest string is the easiest to measure with) and with your picking hand, fret that same string on the fret where the neck joins to the body. Then inspect the gap between the fretted string to the 7th fret. A setup that's suitable for the way most people play is about 0.5mm. You can measure this accurately by sliding a feeler gauge the appropriate thickness between the string and the fret Too little gap or no gap whatsoever means that the truss rod is too tight. More than 0.5mm indicates that the truss rod may need to be tightened,

2. This method is also a way to tell if your neck is twisted or your frets have excessive wear on one side or the other. Measure the relief with the method listed above on the bass side and also measure the same way on the treble side. A perfectly straight neck calls for both measurements to be exactly the same. Any deviations indicate that the neck could be twisted.

3. To adjust the truss rod, ensure that whatever adjustment tool you use (be it an Allan wrench, a screwdriver or a box spanner) is fully engaged with the nut it indexes into. Avoid adjusting the truss rod without the tool fully engaged or you risk chewing the adjustment nut up.

4. Asian-made guitars generally call for metric tools to adjust them. US-made guitars (and some Mexican) generally call for Imperial. This is very important because a 3/16" Allen wrench is ever so slightly undersized for the 5mm barrel nut to adjust the truss rod found on many Asian-made guitars and you seriously risk stripping the barrel nut out if you use a 3/16" wrench on a 5mm truss rod. Make sure you use metric tools on metric parts!

5. Truss rods nearly always tighten in a clockwise direction facing down the adjustment nut. This means that a truss rod nut at the bottom of a guitar's neck will adjust in the opposite direction to one at the top of the neck.

6. Only tighten the truss rod up to a 1/4 turn at any one time. You can tighten it more than that, but allow time for the guitar' neck to stabilize from the forces you're imparting on it before you adjust it further. Measure your neck relief again with every adjustment you make.

7. Some truss rods can act on the neck in both directions. They're called 2-way truss rods and they're more common on modern guitars. If you guitar has one, you can turn the truss rod counterclockwise and it'll actually force the neck into relief rather than straighten it out. This can be very useful when you want to use really light gauge strings or if you neck naturally backbows with no string or truss rod tension on it.

8. If you have adjusted the truss rod to be very tight, and you're still not getting the correct neck relief, consult a guitar tech. Over tightening the truss rod can cause damage that is very difficult and expensive to repair. Exercise common sense; If you feel as though you might break the truss rod if you tighten it any further, STOP.

9. If you're about to adjust the truss rod and it's already tight, always start adjusting it by loosening first.

10. If your guitar's action mysteriously seems to raise or lower when you can swear on your mother's life that you never adjusted the action at the bridge, then do not adjust the action at the bridge. Check the neck relief in the method mentioned at step 1 and chances are, you'll find that neck relief has changed. Adjust the truss rod accordingly. Adjusting the action at the bridge when only the truss rod needs adjustment only compounds the problem your originally had.
Quote by Axelfox
Please understand how little we as a community care
#5
Thanks! It's a good start =)

I see now that "general" tips will be like "nothing about everything" so, it's better to have one topic and work on tips.
T00DEEPBLUE we can start with your suggestion, but if we want it to be "by Electric Guitar Forum" we need to have some impact from other regulars here =) or there is nothing to add?

If we can manage it to post once a week from different forums, we can even reserve a place here

#6
I agree, we need more people to get in here and contribute for this to work and I like the thought that the information this forum produces can help people outside of its own sphere.

I also agree that everyone's contributions need to be about specific topics or else the content just isn't going to be very good quality. I think having everything in a top 10 format is pretty good too because it forces the article to get straight to the point and it makes each point easier to digest.

I'd really like this to be a thing.

Get in here you lot!
Quote by Axelfox
Please understand how little we as a community care
#7
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
Alright, I'll take a shot at it, here are 10 tips:


1) Take the time to learn how to properly setup and intonate your own guitars. That way you save yourself from having to pay a guitar tech every time you need an adjustment.

2) If you are budgeting around buying a guitar and amp at the same time, don't cheap out on your amplifier. While it might be tempting to splurge your budget on a nice Gibson, your amp plays a bigger part in your overall sound and you will benefit by spending a bit more on one.

3) If you find your toggle switches, pots or jacks aren't functioning as they should, try hitting them with contact cleaner before you take it to a tech. You might find that after a cleaning, your parts are working properly again!

4) String your guitar properly! Sometimes that odd buzz that you can't fix can be caused by poor stringing technique!

5) String winders are your friend.

6) Tight knob that won't come off the pot? Wrap a shoe lace or a guitar rag under the knob and slowly pull it upwards to remove it.

7) If you are using a tube amp and changing power tubes, make sure you know if your amp needs to be biased. Generally fixed-bias amps need to be adjusted periodically and with new tubes and cathode biased amps are "self-biasing".

8) If your amp is a head and cabinet, make sure you match the impedance of the head to the cabinet and make sure the cabinet has sufficient wattage to support the wattage of your head. If you dont, you might end up damaging your amp!

9) Want to get better? Practice, practice, practice...

10) Gear taste and tone are subjective. Don't forget it


We can make from this one a big Top Tips, but maybу better to have Top 5 in this case and get more advice form in each section.

Like:
9) Want to get better? Practice, practice, practice...
Here some lessons to improve your speed link link (I'm sure we can find good in our Lessons section or here)
here some for bass
solo
etc

What do you think?
#8
A dependable compact acoustic recording device is a valuable compositional tool: use it to "take notes" on your ideas by humming them. Listen to your audio memos later to refine them when you have time and your instrument handy.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!


alhaq369
It is very impotent to success a business.
#9
Quote by Shura_FYI
We can make from this one a big Top Tips, but maybу better to have Top 5 in this case and get more advice form in each section.

Like:
9) Want to get better? Practice, practice, practice...
Here some lessons to improve your speed link link (I'm sure we can find good in our Lessons section or here)
here some for bass
solo
etc

What do you think?


Yeah you could do something like that. Make it a bit smaller with a few links people can click so they can get more in depth with it etc...
Quote by Axelfox
my mom and i went to a furry con and on the second day she said she didn't come and pay money to go see dumb shit.


Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
#10
Big tip: try everything you can before you buy. Try anything and everything you can get your hands on, especially as a first time buyer. Some people really like the feel of a Les Paul, some like a Stratocaster, or maybe a flying V. Familiarizing yourself with your options on body style and necks is a big deal. What I like may not be what you come to like. The right answer is what works for you based on your set of circumstances. The forum can help guide you, but can't get in your head and tell you weather you'll like the feel of a BC Rich Warlock or Fender Stratocaster better.

Same with amps, go in and listen to them. Do you need a Peavey 6505 or Blues Jr.? While amps shape your tone, you still need to listen, preferably in person. Youtube is nice, but getting a hands-on idea of what's out there is a good thing to have when it comes to having a personal overview on what you can get from the amp.

Go slow. You're not wrong to revisit something several times before spending the money.
Guitars:
Squire Bullet Strat, Schecter Damien 6, Washburn WG-587 & RX10
Amp/Effects:
Peavy Vypyr 30, ISP Decimator

Quote by dannyalcatraz
Understood- I waste money on amps*, too.
#11
Serial Numbers are important. Write them down and keep them in your wallet. Dont think a burglary cant and wont happen to you. CYA and have proof of ownership on you. This happened to me and having my serial numbers available on the spot saved my gear and caught the criminal redhanded. W/o them I would have had to watch someone else buy my gear off the shelf or buy it back myself. Trust me and do it now.
Jackson Pro King V
Schecter LE Hellraiser C-1
Schecter Hellraiser V-1
Peavey 6505+
Marshall1960a
Line 6 Wireless G50> Boss TU-3> Dunlop Orignal Crybaby> Ibanez TS-9> MXR Smart Gate> Digitech Turbo Flange> MXR Black Label Chorus> MXR Carbon Copy