#1
When I look at Dimarzio's website, they have EQ numbers for each pickup, Treble, Mids, and Bass, as well as an output number. What are these numbers based on?

The reason I ask is because when I look at other brands of pickups, most of them don't have these numbers. So when I look at some of Suhr's pickups, how do I know which of their pickups are similar to some of Dimarzio's as far as Treble, Mids, Bass, and Output?
#2
The EQ numbers are just made up by the manufacturer to help you understand how their pickups relate to each other. They don't correlate to any real measurement or anything. So within one manufacturer they may be helpful. Beyond that, not so much.
Output is odd. Dimarzio uses inductance which is probably the best parameter, but it's actually pretty hard to measure so most other companies use resistance, which is not a stellar way to measure output. Still, it at least is based on a measurement and can give you a very general idea of how hot a pickup is. Again, once you stray outside a single manufacturer there's no set standard, so take the numbers and comparisons skeptically. Two pickups that both measure "10K" resistance may have been measured differently, and even if measured the same their actual output can be quite different.

The trouble, as you've noticed, is that there isn't any real way of conveying pickup sound differences as numbers, and if there is, nobody has agreed to use it. So you're really stuck just asking around on forums, reading reviews, that sort of thing.
#3
Quote by Roc8995
The EQ numbers are just made up by the manufacturer to help you understand how their pickups relate to each other. They don't correlate to any real measurement or anything. So within one manufacturer they may be helpful. Beyond that, not so much.
Output is odd. Dimarzio uses inductance which is probably the best parameter, but it's actually pretty hard to measure so most other companies use resistance, which is not a stellar way to measure output. Still, it at least is based on a measurement and can give you a very general idea of how hot a pickup is. Again, once you stray outside a single manufacturer there's no set standard, so take the numbers and comparisons skeptically. Two pickups that both measure "10K" resistance may have been measured differently, and even if measured the same their actual output can be quite different.

The trouble, as you've noticed, is that there isn't any real way of conveying pickup sound differences as numbers, and if there is, nobody has agreed to use it. So you're really stuck just asking around on forums, reading reviews, that sort of thing.


That's kind of what I was thinking. Thanks for clarifying! The reason I'm looking into this is because my new Suhr Modern Satin just arrived! The Natural finish, HH, Floyd Rose, and it's fucking awesome. I'm going to do a full review on it at some point, but I was seriously blown away. The pickups sound great, they're just not quite what I'm used to with my Dimarzios. In my Ibanez RG655, I had a Dimarzio Crunch Lab in the bridge, and a Dimarzio Air Norton in the neck. I really like both pickups.

But the neck pickup in the Suhr is actually worth keeping. I think I can make it work. But I definitely want to change the bridge to something like a Crunch Lab. I guess I'm just wonder, is there some chance that the same pickup (the Crunch Lab) could sound way different in the Suhr? My Ibanez was a basswood body, the Suhr is African Mahogany. The Ibanez had the Edge trem, my Suhr has the original Floyd Rose. So I'm hoping the pickup won't sound too different.