#1
I have my sights set on purchasing a 7- String Fan Fret under $1000 usd .

I looked at the Legator Ninja 200 SE and at $549 it looks like a very fair price but the build quality on closer inspection has me wondering if I'll be spending more money in the end then buying a better quality fan fret out right .

I'm pretty much set on the Ibanez Iron Label RGIF7 .
I know most guitarist either luv or hate Ibanez .

Any Fan Fret Players out there ?

Opinions , your choice of make and model of a fan fret Guitar , reasons?

Thanks \m/



#2
Agile has a pretty wide range of fan frets, but what they have in stock varies according to what Kurt and the boys from Rondo Music have pulled off the container. Here's a sample: http://www.rondomusic.com/MultiScaleGuitars.html Model numbers beginning in "7" are seven strings (they also have 8's, 9's (occasionally) and sometimes more. The next four numbers usually indicate the scales (though you'll find that in the extended specs), so a 72527 will be a seven string with a 25.5" to 27" scale. They also have a number of 27" - 30" versions, though in my personal experience, I'd save those for 8-strings.
Prices are usually around $500 plus shipping, case, etc. Solid guitars, very well done.
#3
If you're not in a hurry, I'd wait out until a used Carvin pops up. I've seen them do 7 string multiscale guitars for a little over a grand new, so I'd guess finding one under 1000 used is possible.
#4
Quote by I K0nijn I
If you're not in a hurry, I'd wait out until a used Carvin pops up. I've seen them do 7 string multiscale guitars for a little over a grand new, so I'd guess finding one under 1000 used is possible.


They're also doing headless versions, which has me interested.

#5
While not for everyone, headless guitars are really nice. I'd see myself picking up a Strandberg in the coming years.
#6
Hi 1967frank,

I literally just got my RGIF7 yesterday and love it. I find it comfortable to play, but I mostly have Ibanez guitars as they suit me and what I like best, so I always find it hard to recommend something. If you can try them out somewhere i'd always suggest that first and try them, I liked the idea of a Fan Fret guitar and for a few months spent time wondering but I wasn't going to put down all that money for something sub par. Sometimes you only get what you pay for which is why I tend to save up for something slightly better (if that's an option to you)

However Ibanez themselves will probably be bringing out their new catalogue at the start of next year so they might have another Fan Fret guitar it's too hard to tell though.

I hope this helps!
#7
Thanks for the advice everyone . I think my best bet at this time is to settle down emotionally and wait for something used or a sale . Then I could pick up a Carvin/Kiesel , or Ibanez online at a poor man's price .
My Wife would kill me anyways with the Holidays coming up and charging up the CC .
Those low end priced fan frets are soooo tempting but it would be foolish to purchase one without test driving one first .
Problem is I live in the boonies and Country Music reins supreme , which is cool but it's a way different mindset towards equipment , sound , etc .

Hell , Like I said . I'll just wait . I have so many other guitars and still so much to be mastered on them .
Thanks once again \m/
#8
Chouharder

If it's not too much trouble , can you get back with me and let me know if you run into any issues with the Ibanez ?
I'd like to know once you have the intonation dialed in does it stay spot on after you drop tune ?
I know the strings need broken in and you need to get use to the guitar but maybe in a couple weeks if you let me know ?
Thanks .
#9
Hey 1967frank, my post may be heavily influenced by recent acquisition of an Ormsby, but I would suggest you to check them out, mine hasn't arrived yet and I couldn't have the chance to test one so I'm blindly recommending them, but I trust the fandom and moreover, I trust Perry Ormsby who's a man very interested in his customers' satisfaction. I would say you should give 'em a try as well, they are (I think, but I might be wrong) cheaper than a Kiesel, not saying they're better because I haven't played a Kiesel either, but I'd say they seem to have a nice hand to hand. We (Ormsby customers + customers to be + Perry) have a fb group were we discuss about future runs and what not. I think Kiesel also has something like this but I'm not in it. I do recommend Agile, even though I haven't tried their multiscale products. I would say Legator would be the easy way, but if you tried one and you liked it you should go for it, I'm just saying there are lots of good brands that sell new for little more than a grand
My gear:
-LTD EC401VF DMZ LD
-Ibanez RG8
Charvel Desolation DX-1 FR
Epiphone G400 PRO
-Yamaha C40M
#10
Quote by 1967frank
Chouharder

If it's not too much trouble , can you get back with me and let me know if you run into any issues with the Ibanez ?
I'd like to know once you have the intonation dialed in does it stay spot on after you drop tune ?
I know the strings need broken in and you need to get use to the guitar but maybe in a couple weeks if you let me know ?
Thanks .


Hi 1967frank,

No worries, I changed the strings on it and i'm still playing around with it but even after changing the strings it was holding its tuning pretty well. I only needed to re-tune a few of the strings. So far though I have to say i'm really happy with it.
#11
Thanks Riks Riks , I was on the Ormsby Website and did check them out . It's best to know who's who in the multi - scale guitar build business especially imo , a old concept that is growing and will only get bigger as time passes .

Sounds good Chouharder , btw I had the original vinyl album back in the day Floyd's " Piper at the Gates of Dawn " . Heck , they were all original up until " The Final Cut " . X - Wife got everything . Sabbath , Floyd and Deep Purple from age 10 to this day still gets it for me . lol

Well I dropped some money on a Gretsch G5420T Electromatic in pearl white this morning . The price was to good to pass up since I been wanting a Ibanez Artcore AF75TDGIV for months reason being the Gretsch was $249 more . At only $49 more I couldn't resist .

Kinda screwed myself out of a multi scale till I pay the Gretsch off but I'm sure I'll have a lot fun running scales and pretending to be a jazz player in the meanwhile lol .

Happy Thanksgiving Everyone !

#12
Quote by I K0nijn I
While not for everyone, headless guitars are really nice. I'd see myself picking up a Strandberg in the coming years.


I don't have a headless in the stack yet, and the Kiesels *are* practical. Bodies are smaller than those in ordinary guitars, and with the two strap buttons on the bottom, you can lean it against an amp with less likelihood that it will simply keel over. The much-reduced length (shorter body and no headstock, so around 10" shorter than a similar-scale guitar), the full-size scales (25.5" - 27"), the neck-through construction with very little in the way of clunky neck heel and pretty great upper fret access seems to make it comfortable and convenient to transport.

I like the Strandberg as well, but I think I'd want to start with the Kiesel to determine if I really wanted to spend $4K and 3-4 months to get a bolt-neck version.
Last edited by dspellman at Nov 26, 2016,
#13
Anything over the $1500 price tag not for me , if I were making money then yes .
I just get more satisfaction spending money on the accessories to compliment a guitar . Those carbon fiber Jazz 3 picks by Dunlop . Man , it did so much for me for so little money increasing the enjoyment playing a electric guitar .

I'm just a tight wad when it come to $$$ I guess ... lol
#14
Quote by 1967frank
Anything over the $1500 price tag not for me , if I were making money then yes .
I just get more satisfaction spending money on the accessories to compliment a guitar . Those carbon fiber Jazz 3 picks by Dunlop . Man , it did so much for me for so little money increasing the enjoyment playing a electric guitar .

I'm just a tight wad when it come to $$$ I guess ... lol



You might want to take a look at Gravity Picks.
#15
Quote by dspellman
I don't have a headless in the stack yet, and the Kiesels *are* practical. Bodies are smaller than those in ordinary guitars, and with the two strap buttons on the bottom, you can lean it against an amp with less likelihood that it will simply keel over. The much-reduced length (shorter body and no headstock, so around 10" shorter than a similar-scale guitar), the full-size scales (25.5" - 27"), the neck-through construction with very little in the way of clunky neck heel and pretty great upper fret access seems to make it comfortable and convenient to transport.

I like the Strandberg as well, but I think I'd want to start with the Kiesel to determine if I really wanted to spend $4K and 3-4 months to get a bolt-neck version.


Strandberg also has the Boden OS line. At 2000 euros/dollars, it's pretty steep for an Asian made guitar, in my opinion, but if there wasn't an explicite note of it being Asian made, you would've never known. And I don't mean there's something wrong with Asian made guitars, it's just that they're usually not 2 grand unless they're made in Japan.

Overall, it was a stellar guitar. Different, but it didn't take any adjusting, felt very natural and sounded really good. I don't usually play a lot of leads, but I can't say I noticed any disadvantages from the Boden OS having a bolt-on neck. Also, I don't know how the necks on the Carvins are, but the Boden has a very outspoken angular shape, making it so you always have your thumb on a flat surface instead of a curved one. I reckon it feels weird if you play with your thumb over the fretboard, but it felt awesome to me, being used to playing with the thumb on the back of the neck.
#16
Quote by I K0nijn I
Strandberg also has the Boden OS line. At 2000 euros/dollars, it's pretty steep for an Asian made guitar, in my opinion, but if there wasn't an explicite note of it being Asian made, you would've never known. And I don't mean there's something wrong with Asian made guitars, it's just that they're usually not 2 grand unless they're made in Japan.


The Boden 7 multiscale headless I was looking at (which would correspond to the Kiesel VM7) was $3500 base, with options adding up to a thousand more to get it to the level of the Kiesel. I'm fine with "Asian made," since that usually represents a better value than the same price USA-made. I'm not sure that I prefer a bolt neck to a neck-through, nor the bottom "cutaway" portion (great for seated playing) to the easily-leaned setup on the Kiesel. Since I'm within a casual afternoon's drive of the Carvin factory, I can actually drive down and discuss the guitar with them, perhaps even look over some wood samples if necessary.

And, too, I've already got a number of Carvins.

The neck shape is interesting, and I was unaware of the angles on it. I usually play with my thumb on the back of the neck anyway (rather than wrapped), so that's not an issue. It's difficult to wrap a thumb anyway when you're working with necks wider than six strings (and with the frets NOT in the same place on the bass side anyway). You either have good technique or you struggle a bit.
Last edited by dspellman at Nov 27, 2016,
#17
I think Kiesel is the better option in your case for sure. For me, the Kiesel probably comes in at about the same as a Swedish made Strandberg, being in Europe and all. Then in my case, I'd rather get a Strandberg that I know I'll like because I've played their model than a Kiesel that I've never played. And your case is probably the other way around. I doubt you can go wrong with either of them.
#18
dspellman

Nice looking picks .
I see Rob Chapman has his own line .
I like the very small size of the Jazz 3's carbons and i know they look like they would be easy to lose a grip on but they had like a sandpaper texture .
I like them .
#19
check Kiesel's in stock guitars ...... I bet you see a couple under a 1000.00 brand new ..... just checked , third one down BINGO , fooey , false alarm it's not fan fret , but they do show up on there from time to time (more like week to week)

http://www.kieselguitars.com/guitarsinstock/electric-guitars
Last edited by Fumble fingers at Nov 27, 2016,
#21
Quote by 1967frank
dspellman

Nice looking picks .
I see Rob Chapman has his own line .
I like the very small size of the Jazz 3's carbons and i know they look like they would be easy to lose a grip on but they had like a sandpaper texture .
I like them .


I tried out a couple of the Gravities, but initially said, "No way am I buying six buck picks." I figured I'd just lose them. Turns out I just took better care of them. My favorite happened to be a 2mm Razer Standard, but it's in a nearly-transparent light blue clear color. Chappers rolled in, all YouTube famousAnus and got a Gravity Pick Signature pick that is that very same 2mm Razer Standard but that has a couple of custom features (including a darker color) that I like, and since it's the same price as one without the features, I decided I could tolerate his scrawl on the pick for the bargain on the finish and color, so I ordered up.
#22
Quote by 1967frank
Fumble fingers

Thanks , I'll keep my eyes open .


you might call Kiesel sales department and ask what it would take for a budget 7 string multi scale , they might recommend solid color , ect , ect to keep cost down ..... they quite possible be able to build you a new one well within your budget , Jeff Kiesel on FB live constantly says "call sales " and ASK questions