#1
In black metal in particular there are moments when the drums help the guitarist, but often they play against. It can be 130bpm, the guitar plays 16th triplets and the drums do non-triplet 32th. The question is how do you keep the rhythm if the drums don't help?
#3
Check this:



From 0:04 as I said the guitar plays 3 notes per beat and the drums do 4.
As you can see, the drums go just like a machine gun, whithout any emphasizing of the quarters I could stick to.

From 0:16 the drums start doing triplets as the guitar does and things get easier:

This is another situation. The guitar plays 4 per beat, drums do 3 (4:50)
Last edited by ptrtss at Nov 22, 2016,
#4
ptrtssUltimately you need to be able to provide ypour own time source. If you know the beats per bar, and track that (i.e. what you tap your foot to), that's most of the battle.
https://soundcloud.com/jerry-kramskoy-1
#5
to practice these kinds of rhythms, I suggest starting with 3 over 2.

Set the metronome to 60 and just count every other click. That's your downbeat. Now try to play a triplet, ignoring the upbeat click. Stomp your foot on the downbeat if you have to, to stay in time. The trick is to keep your focus on downbeat. Once you can do 3 over 2 at a slower tempo, you pretty much have the skill for other goofy rhythms, though 5s and 7s can be tough.
#6
cdgraves Thank you, good advice. I have to tell though that there're two approaches I'm currently thinking of.

One is what you suggested: slow tempo methronome and a lot of practice.

The other is trying to leverage the fact that it's the tremolos do 3 beats, not the melody.

I feel there's a chance I'll manage to build up a tremolo autopilot, and that'll enable me to concentrate on the beats.
#7
Well, a technique can't really develop without the rhythm holding it together. When you're working on fast subdivisions, it's best to start with the slow subdivisions and phase in the faster ones. Remember that tremolo doesn't just mean "fast as possible". It's a specific subdivision, likely 16th, 32nd, or sextuplet, which means that you're either playing on time or not on time. Once you can do the heavily syncopated accents, you can fill in with the faster subdivisions in between. Otherwise you're likely to develop the "skill" of keeping accurate count while playing out of time.
Last edited by cdgraves at Nov 28, 2016,