#1
Hi, i'm trying to figure out what scale Chuck uses in both these songs by Death


0:36

2:13

thanks!
Last edited by thrasher89 at Nov 24, 2016,
#2
Understanding these riffs in "scales" doesn't make much sense. The first riff is just major thirds chromatically descending from G to E. So G B F# A# F A E G#.

The second riff is Eb D F E Ab Eb D. Again, a lot of chromaticism. It's not any particular scale. D is still clearly the tonic, i.e., the note that the riff is centered around.

How to write riffs like this? Well, just find some "evil" sounding intervals and use them. The b2 and the b5 (in the key of D they would be Eb and Ab) usually give an "evil" sound. Neither of them belong to the major or the minor scale and they just sound dissonant. Add some more chromaticism and you've got a brutal riff. It's all about avoiding basic major and minor sounds
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#3
For "Leprosy", I figure due to the descending major 3rd interval leaps, it implies going from F# Phrygian dominant to E Phrygian dominant scales...makes it sound chromatic in a way. The lick right before the next riff dips in a bit of E fully diminished scale, it seems.


"Pull The Plug" is a mixed bag...if the riff resolves to D, then I would say he uses D half diminished, and dips into a bit of D minor due to the F and E being used...other than the E, everything else can be summed up with D half diminished.

Hope that leads you in the right direction!
#4
Sure, you can make them fit some scale if you really want. But the thing with the first riff is that it's just chromatically descending major thirds. That is the proper explanation for it. Explaining it with scales just feels kind of forced and kind of misses the point.

When it comes to the second riff, again, does explaining it with scales make sense? I really don't think so. It just has a lot of chromaticism. I wouldn't say it is in a major or a minor key either. It is in the key of D (because D is the tonic) but it basically avoids the typical major and minor sounds. Sure, the F and E on their own would suggest D minor, but in this context they really don't bring any typical minor sound to it so I wouldn't really analyze it as D minor (because D minor analysis would suggest some more "tonal" sounding stuff).

I just don't see a point with forcing scalar thinking into everything because many times it just doesn't explain that well what's happening in the music.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Nov 24, 2016,
#5
MaggaraMarine

I agree with your explanation. I feel maybe I was too literal with answering the question and ignored the overall point of the music.

Still...to Thrasher89, I hope you got something out of this!
#6
MaggaraMarine

I agree with your explanation. I feel maybe I was too literal with answering the question and ignored the overall point of the music.

Still...to Thrasher89, I hope you got something out of this!