#1
What are some good jazz guitars? I prefer Gibson! Like es 335? Is that a good one? I honestly have got no idea.
#2
If you have no idea what are good jazz guitars, then it's interesting that you "prefer Gibson," don't you think?

Jazz can be (and has been) played on almost anything. I've seen some great musicians playing big hollowbodies like Super 400's, L5's, ES-175s, Epiphone Emperors (I have an old 1939 non-cutaway version), Johnny Smiths, etc. At the same time, I've seen some great work done on Strats, the occasional LP, and a wide variety of solid bodies. I have a '70's Gibson L5S (solid body L5) that marries a solid body with the L5 neck and pickups.
There are also a wide variety of brand names, neck scales and string numbers that are doing jazz. George Van Eps was one of the early adopters of 7-string guitars, and it wasn't a Gibson.

One of the very best jazz guitars I've played was built by a guy named Jim Soloway, and it had a 27" scale, a 1 13/16ths" nut (and it maintained that 1/8th" wider neck all the way to a custom-made bridge) and was a single-cut hollowed-out body with a 15" width and a single f-hole. Google the Soloway Single 15. I think he called his 27" scale versions the Swan. This is Jim playing on a Single 15:

#3
Quote by dspellman
If you have no idea what are good jazz guitars, then it's interesting that you "prefer Gibson," don't you think?

Jazz can be (and has been) played on almost anything. I've seen some great musicians playing big hollowbodies like Super 400's, L5's, ES-175s, Epiphone Emperors (I have an old 1939 non-cutaway version), Johnny Smiths, etc. At the same time, I've seen some great work done on Strats, the occasional LP, and a wide variety of solid bodies. I have a '70's Gibson L5S (solid body L5) that marries a solid body with the L5 neck and pickups.
There are also a wide variety of brand names, neck scales and string numbers that are doing jazz. George Van Eps was one of the early adopters of 7-string guitars, and it wasn't a Gibson.

One of the very best jazz guitars I've played was built by a guy named Jim Soloway, and it had a 27" scale, a 1 13/16ths" nut (and it maintained that 1/8th" wider neck all the way to a custom-made bridge) and was a single-cut hollowed-out body with a 15" width and a single f-hole. Google the Soloway Single 15. I think he called his 27" scale versions the Swan. This is Jim playing on a Single 15:



Thanks! I just heard a lot of good things about Gibson and Fender! I already have both, but I have a les paul custom and a fender strat limited edition 1995. Could I get a good sound out of these? Oh, I also have a Cort Hiram Bullock signature! Is that good too?
#4
Quote by Colja123
Thanks! I just heard a lot of good things about Gibson and Fender! I already have both, but I have a les paul custom and a fender strat limited edition 1995. Could I get a good sound out of these? Oh, I also have a Cort Hiram Bullock signature! Is that good too?


I have no idea about the Cort but you shouldn't have a problem getting "a good sound" out of both of the other guitars.
#5
+1 on what dspellman said. Just about anything will work with the right amplification chain, so use whatever takes your fancy. - A lot of it is about looks and tradition in most genres.

My guess is that the Cort will be fine, but I personally would block or deck the trem.
#6
There's a jazz combo that plays the major brunches around here. The guitarist introduced me to Godin guitars. His was one of the LPclones they make- possibly a LGXT.

Alex Skolnick of Testament also has a jazz trio. He uses Hamers- often semihollows.

Some jazz artists use Ibanez semihollows.

Pickups favored by those and others include humbuckers, P90s, Charlie Christians, EMGs, and standard strat or Tele singlecoils.

What's going to be the biggest factors? IMHO:

1) your amp's clean tone

2) your guitar's clean tone

3) your comfort factor with your guitar

On that first point, I'd look hard at tube amps from Fender, Carvin or Vox, or a nice SS amp from Roland or Quilter.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!


alhaq369
It is very impotent to success a business.
#7
A lot of jazz guitarists seem to favour SS amps, but it is a niche I know nothing about. It sometimes gets discussed in the Usenet jazz guitar group, which is still very active. I've just posted an enquiry there.
#8
I'm currently learning jazz on an Epi Sheraton through a Fender Princeton.I did change the pickups.It does the job for me.One online jazz teacher i watch uses a Strat and manages to get a good tone out of it.Another uses an Ibanez semi hollow and another a G&L Tele.So if i were you i'd decide what you like and what feels comfortable to you rather than conforming to any jazzer stereotype.
2016 Gibson Les Paul Traditional T in Light Burst
'77 Hardtail Strat
Epiphone Sheraton MIK Duncan '59's
MIJ 84/85 Tele
MIM Std Tele
Fender Blues Jnr
Digitech Screamin' Blues
#9
Quote by dannyalcatraz
There's a jazz combo that plays the major brunches around here. The guitarist introduced me to Godin guitars. His was one of the LPclones they make- possibly a LGXT.

Alex Skolnick of Testament also has a jazz trio. He uses Hamers- often semihollows.

Some jazz artists use Ibanez semihollows.

Pickups favored by those and others include humbuckers, P90s, Charlie Christians, EMGs, and standard strat or Tele singlecoils.

What's going to be the biggest factors? IMHO:

1) your amp's clean tone

2) your guitar's clean tone

3) your comfort factor with your guitar

On that first point, I'd look hard at tube amps from Fender, Carvin or Vox, or a nice SS amp from Roland or Quilter.

No love for Peavey, smh. I'd throw a delta blues out there way before a British voiced amp, as good as they are
But we little know until tried how much of the uncontrollable there is in us, urging across glaciers and torrents, and up dangerous heights, let the judgment forbid as it may.
#10
I got a response from Nate Najar, a pro New York Jazz player, on Usenet on the subject of amps:

I say find a used polytone. they sound terrific. really any amp that can
stay clean at the volume you need is appropriate. many guys like the
brightness of a fender but it has to be large enough to not distort. The solid state trend is because they tend to be designed to stay clean.


Here's some more:

There are some good deals if you go used on jazz amps. I just picked up an AI Corus amp for only $550. It's a light combo that can handle any room. It's better than the AI Coda and RS10 I was using, and I can use the RS10 with it for really large halls.
I'm using it tonight, and I never have volume problems with it. AI fixes it for free if you ever have problems with them.
Last edited by Tony Done at Nov 28, 2016,
#11
Dreadnought

I don't hate them, but the only Peaveys I have experience with that I'd have suggested would be the Delta Blues 115. Thhe others I know were either too "metal" or had attributes I didn't care for.

There was one- I can't remember which- that was one of my final 3 options when I was shopping for my first amp. Couldn't dial out some ice-pick frequencies, even with assistance.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!


alhaq369
It is very impotent to success a business.