#1
Hi there .
Can you tell me the name of some books for practice scale ? (Major and pentatonics scale )
The more the better
Last edited by broken-spades at Nov 28, 2016,
#3
Pentagonics don't you mean Pentecostal?

Wait Pentatonic

+1 YouTube is a good source for free lessons
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#5
Quote by broken-spades
Yes pentatonic
I like book a book that has very practice


Depending on where you are located there are alot of options out there:

https://www.amazon.com/Guitar-Scale-Guru-Creative-Publishing/dp/1569221863

https://www.amazon.com/Guitar-Grimoire-Compendium-Formulas-Scales/dp/0825821711

http://shop.everything.com/the-everything-guitar-scales-book-with-cd
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

Come and be with me
Live my twisted dream
Pro devoted pledge
Time for primal concrete sledge

#7
I would avoid references. You gain a lot more ability by working out the scales on your own. Just look up the scale formulas. If you're gonna use scales as a practice tool, just take the extra step and work them out note-by-note and position-by-position, because that's how you really pull your hands, ears, and head into it all at once.
#10
Honestly there's not really going to be a book for "practicing scales", you simply want some exercises. What kind of exercises? Well that largely depends on your goal.

It's important to keep this in mind - nobody really "plays scales", so practicing to get better at playing scales isn't really a practical goal. A scale is simply a tool, a set of sounds that we've decided work nicely together. Most exercises will indeed fit within a scale pattern but don't worry about that aspect too much, any good exercise will have a melodic element as well as a technical one so will sound good as well as being beneficial to your progress.

You probably also want to look at arpeggios as arguably they're more useful from a phrasing point of view, and understanding how arpeggios and scales fit together is a great help when it comes to avoiding the trap of "playing in boxes". Finally, always remember that the most important aspect of a scale is the sound it makes, not where it appears on the guitar fretboard, so make sure your paying attention to the notes and intervals your exercises use as well as the technical aspects.

Troy Stetina's Fretboard Mastery is worth looking at.
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#11
Scales are scales they don't mean crap , u can take a 3 chord progression and play a scale over it and certain notes sound like garbage, praticing modes over chord progressions is a great way for beginner to understand a little theory. Each mode is typically known for its own genre major and minors are the same thing with a different starting note like Amin and Cmaj are the same scale same as c Ionian and D Dorian , E Phrygian, f Lydian Gmixildian all the same scale just different start point , don't get brain washed in scales and focus of playing over chord progressions
#12
Quote by Fraley1991
Scales are scales they don't mean crap , u can take a 3 chord progression and play a scale over it and certain notes sound like garbage, praticing modes over chord progressions is a great way for beginner to understand a little theory. Each mode is typically known for its own genre major and minors are the same thing with a different starting note like Amin and Cmaj are the same scale same as c Ionian and D Dorian , E Phrygian, f Lydian Gmixildian all the same scale just different start point , don't get brain washed in scales and focus of playing over chord progressions

no, they're not. Please don't bring modes into a discussion if you don't understand them yourself.
Actually called Mark!

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...it's a seagull

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i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


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