#1
Hello esteemed UG members,

Planning to learn to play the guitar. Help me pick between two beginner guitar options:
1) Epiphone Pro-1
2) Cort AC-100

Which one would you suggest and why?

Many thanks in advance for your input.

ps. hope this was posted in the right section.

- playthestrings
#2
Quote by Captaincranky
The Epi "Pro 1" series acoustics are designed for players who are beginning, and those more experienced who want to "shred" on an acoustic. The combination of light strings, low action, and jumbo frets should make any former electric guitarist feel right at home.

The light strings do sacrifice a bit of the heavy bottom, projecting sound, of a more traditional acoustic dreadnought.

With that said, the only purchase I would make of that series is the, "Pro 1 Ultra", the top AE version. I think former electric players would tire of an all acoustic version of the guitar rather rapidly.

Face it guys, it's not like you're just learning or anything. Much sooner, rather than later, you're gonna want to plug in, kick in a couple of FX, and bend some strings.
#3
Well, one is a nylon string, the other a steel string, very different beasts. What kind of music do you want to play? Popular western genres, or classical, Latin jazz or flamenco? That's simplifying it a bit, but it is a start.
#4
Thanks for the replies.

Tony, as far as I know, they are both nylon string

The pro-1 classic (the regular pro-1 is steel, indeed, the Classic model, however, is nylon AFAIK..it's just a bit misleading on Epiphone's official site as they mention the same strings for all pro-1 models)
http://www.guitarworld.com/magazine-electrics-acoustics-gear-artist-videos-news/review-epiphone-pro-1-acoustic-and-les-paul

And the Cort:
http://cortguitars.com/en/product/product_view.asp?idx=117

Nylon is what I'm after as I was told it's easier on the fingers of a beginner and also because I intend to get into flamenco and as far as I know nylon is more suitable for that...that's simplifying it and I understand Flamenco is a long way off, obviously, but that's my thought process.

Lawrency, the Ultra is a good suggestion, but for now I first want to see how I like playing the guitar, whether I stick with it and how fast I can learn before I commit to something a bit more serious.

I'm essentially just looking for a good quality acoustic that is a bit more forgiving so that the learning curve is somewhat less steep.

I'm learning from zero via a Udemy course, BTW.

As for musical styles, Blues and Flamenco are what I see myself playing down the road and maybe a couple of acoustic all-time classics that are easy yet fun to play (Nirvana, Clapton, Floyd, Gilmour, etc.)

Any input is appreciated.
Last edited by playthestrings1 at Nov 28, 2016,
#5
My mistake, the Pro-1 is a series that includes nylon strings rather than a specific guitar. I think that Captaincranky was thinking more about steel strings in his comments, but I stand to be corrected on that.

Given your interests, I would say that a nylon string is a reasonable choice, but between those two I have no idea. Both makes are popular here in Oz.
#6
Hello & welcome,

Although both are nylon string guitars there are some differences. The Epihone has been designed as a "beginners" guitar - it has a thinner body, shorter scale length, light gauge strings and narrower neck - it is designed to make playing easier but I suspect there will be some sacrifices. The Cort is a traditional classical guitar.

Personally I would choose the Cort - but I'm not a beginner. But for a beginner, the Epihone might be a good deal - they are inexpensive so you could always upgrade when you progress - there is a lot to be said for ease of playing when you start learning (the thing I'm a little dubious about is the shorter scale length).
Last edited by Garthman at Nov 29, 2016,
#7
Garthman

Thanks for the welcome and your two cents, good food for thought. What do you think a shorter scale length could impact negatively?
#8
Still a difficult question to answer. If you wish to play Flamenco, it is nylon all the way. Steel strings provide so much tension for the right hand that some techniques become near impossible to perform, not to even mention the tonal qualities/differences. Blues however, with it's blue notes and minor bends everywhere is quite difficult to perform, but at least possible with an admittedly large amount of effort, on nylon strings. So the two are not easy to combine on one instrument. Personally I'd go with the nylon strings, but given that such is both my main source of income as well as me being mainly a Flamenco player, mine is clearly a biased opinion.
Wise Man Says: The guitar is obviously female, she's got hips, breasts... and a hole.
UG's Flamenco Club
#9
FretboardToAsh

Thanks for your input. Definitely planning to start with nylon. I'm starting from zero and I understand it is easier to learn on nylon strings. Just a bit torn between the two models.
#10
Quote by playthestrings1
Garthman

Thanks for the welcome and your two cents, good food for thought. What do you think a shorter scale length could impact negatively?


The distance between frets reduces as the scale length shortens so it can be a problem when you play a guitar with a full scale length since your fingers have grown accustomed to the different sizes.. But I've now read the full spec of the Epiphone and actually the scale length is only 1 inch shorter than normal so I don't think it will be a problem. I also notice that the neck width is 1.75 inch which is the same as many steel string acoustics. It seems quite a lot of thought has gone into the design - might well be a good buy.

More info here:

http://www.epiphone.com/Products/Acoustic/PRO-1-Classic.aspx
#11
Garthman

I have a nylon string (a converted reso) with a 24" scale, and slack string feel has been a minus for me. To make it work comfortably I would need to get high tension strings, which aren't available locally. I've currently got it tuned to open E, which is OK.

We've discussed nut width before. 1 3/4" is marginal for me with nylon strings, especially if they feel slack.
#12
Quote by playthestrings1
FretboardToAshI'm starting from zero and I understand it is easier to learn on nylon strings.


This is actually... well, I won't say it's false. But I'm not going to say it's true either. In my experience it's just one of those many things that people have a bias towards. But I've never personally, nor known my students to actually find to be negatively impacting their playing or learning in any way. Nylon strings to me are more difficult to play, they always have been and it's STILL my chosen instrument for half my playing career.

If I could have just a fraction of the steel-string tension and low action, combined with the tone of nylon I'd jump at it in an instant. And the way fingertips just seem to grip onto the coarse, even when unwound steel strings, where they just slide off those slippery nylons is great. But my main reason is always tone, and in the end that's what's important. All technique will eventually come and adjust to what your playing.
Wise Man Says: The guitar is obviously female, she's got hips, breasts... and a hole.
UG's Flamenco Club
#13
Quote by Tony Done
Garthman

I have a nylon string (a converted reso) with a 24" scale, and slack string feel has been a minus for me. To make it work comfortably I would need to get high tension strings, which aren't available locally. I've currently got it tuned to open E, which is OK.

We've discussed nut width before. 1 3/4" is marginal for me with nylon strings, especially if they feel slack.


Tony

Yeah. I don't like short scale guitars. But the Epi is 25.6 ins scale length so it's only an inch shorter than a traditional classical (similar to the difference between Gibson LP and Fender Strat scales) - I think it would be OK to start on.

I use hard tension strings on my classical even with a full scale length. I also have two other guitars fitted with nylon strings - also hard tension: (1) a cheapy all-laminate dreadnought with 43mm neck - I've replaced the original nut (35mm E to E midpoint string spacing) with an adapted 45mm nut so I have a 37.5mm E to E spacing - it works OK for me. And (2) an old Ovation-type deep-bowl with a 45m neck - again I've replaced the nut with one I've cut to a 39mm E to E spacing (gives me a smidge under 3mm from the E strings to the fretboard edge - works fine). I use both guitars a lot.