#1
I currently own a 20 watt amplifier and I'm thinking of buying another but if I do it would be 100 watts because the 50 watt is lacking a lot of features. Is 100 watt too loud for bedroom practice? If I turn it down to a reasonable volume will it sound weird?
#2
depends on the power, 100w from a shitty solid state amp will sound bad, 100w from a high end tube amp will piss your neighbors off, the ones a few streets down.

in the future when asking for help provide some details to the story, that's assuming you want actual help.
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#3
You see that volume knob? Use it to turn it down to a reasonable volume BEFORE YOU BUY THE STEAMING THING and listen. If it sounds weird, don't buy it.
#5
You mean the 100W Katana is the one you're going to be buying? The one with a half-a-watt power mode and a headphone jack?

Should be fine.
#6
guys lighten up a bit he's new lets not scare him off or be unkind without a good reason. gu1tarn00b this ? gets asked like every week so folks get a little snarky at times.

ok yes you could use that amp in your bedroom and likely be fine. having said that you won't be able to turn it up and it probably won't sound as good as it could at a louder volume. I use a 50 watt tube amp at home and so far the wife and neighbors haven't killed me. you do sacrifice a little at low volumes but if it's just for practice then not really a big deal.
#8
Quote by gu1tarn00b
I currently own a 20 watt amplifier and I'm thinking of buying another but if I do it would be 100 watts because the 50 watt is lacking a lot of features. Is 100 watt too loud for bedroom practice? If I turn it down to a reasonable volume will it sound weird?


1) Wattage on digital amps has no bearing on wether they will sound good at lower volumes. Wattage only matters for tube amps, and even there, the wattage alone won't necessarily tell you if it will sound good at lower volume levels.

2) as a general rule, test an amp at the volume you intend to play it. Some amps sound great at lower volumes and others don't.
#9
Some higher wattage amps actually sound better at low volumes than their lower wattage siblings.
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#11
Also bear in mind- it will likely sound quieter in the shop than it will at home.

Been caught out like that before
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#12
The Derringer Products Guitar Bullet PMA-10 is great for a wide rang of uses. For practice and for stage its great. Although it is not a toy, its high-end pro gear.
#13
Quote by metalmingee
Some higher wattage amps actually sound better at low volumes than their lower wattage siblings.

Absolutely true/ My RM100 sounds heaps better than my RM20 at low volumes.
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#14
I would be asking about size and weight in 100w. I looked it up and it is very reasonable by my tube amp standards, so I wouldn't be concerned about the high power rating.
#15
I have a Peavey 6506+ 120watt half stack and a Mesa Roadster 100w/50w switchable power 2X12 combo I used both in my small jam room and get great sounds at low volume.

And as Tony said weight is a factor for 100w tube amp my Mesa Roadster weighs in at a hefty 100 lbs. one pound per watt LOL
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#17
Quote by Tony Done
Evilnine

Which goes up to about 2lb per watt at 20w. That's a useful way of thinking of it.

It looks neater in metric - 1kilo/watt.


It does have removable caster though!
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#18
100 watts solid state = The potential to be rather loud, but there's always the volume knob. Solid states don't need to be cranked up to sound their best. In fact, many would say the louder you turn one up, the worse it sounds.

100 watts tube = Get ready for the cops to show up!
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#19
Like others have said, just find an amp you can afford, and listen to it at the volume you would practice at... if it sounds good get it.

Now, I'm going to be controversial here:

I wouldn't even get an amp these days.

Get yourself some decent, within your budget, studio monitors. Then, get yourself a Focusrite Scarlet series 2i4 (or whichever one fits your needs, they have a whole lineup). Then also get some modeling software like overloud's TH3. (that is not a typo, it's actually called TH3). You will probably save yourself a heck of a lot of money.

That can be a lot cheaper than getting a decent amp for practice... depending on your tastes. This also gives you the option of having thousands of setups for WAY cheaper than it would cost otherwise.

Modeling has gotten so damn good these day's... despite what others may tell you. It's not EXACTLY like the real thing, but god is it close!.
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#20
I want to hear some actual pros and cons about this does anybody disagree with Outside Octaves?
#21
Quote by gu1tarn00b
I want to hear some actual pros and cons about this does anybody disagree with Outside Octaves?
I agree with the first bit for the most part:
Quote by Outside Octaves
Like others have said, just find an amp you can afford, and listen to it at the volume you would practice at... if it sounds good get it.
But not universally, always agree with the rest. Some situations call for physical amps, and other situations modeling. Also sometimes an amp that sounds good at bedroom volumes will not be good at louder volumes, if you need those louder volumes.
--
Most modern amps (especially modeling amps) will have master volume controls. What this does is it adjusts the volume of the amp as cleanly, flatly as possible- or at least that is the intention. All the "magic" (or most of it) happens in the preamp section of the amp- tone, distortion, etc. The volume is adjusted by the MV. So your amp can be as quiet or as loud as you want. At REALLY low volumes, the amp may react differently than it would at higher volumes, and a really HIGH volumes it may react differently as well. That is just the nature of the technology in general.

If you are JUST doing bedroom practice, getting a smaller modeling system would be smarter than spending a lot of money on a 100w amp. If you need the 100w potential for gigs, then you need the 100w potential. But if you do not need it, do not waste money on something you do not need. Many modeling softwares can do what physical modeling amps do, but do it better, and have more of it. Depends on the software and the physical amp you are comparing it to.
Last edited by Will Lane at Dec 5, 2016,
#22
Quote by gu1tarn00b
I want to hear some actual pros and cons about this does anybody disagree with Outside Octaves?


I actually do the powered mixer and monitors thing quite a lot, Although not so much with PC generated stuff but a Roland GR-55 and a few other toys, Reason being is that electric guitar amps color they're tone to a manufactures design, Whereas a PA/powered mixer or powered monitors are neutral voiced and the only color is from what you put into them, Be it PC generated or processor peddles, So in the case of something like the GR-55 if you want your guitar to sound like a violin, acoustic guitar or whatever, you don't really want it to sound like its coming from an electric guitar amp, Voiced for an electric guitar, Yes there's a reason for acoustic amps, keyboard amps, PA's (basically the same thing) and electric guitar amps, As to modeling amps they are essentially acoustic/PA amps that get they're flavor from built in Modeling software, So in a perfect world if on the clean channel and no effects being used then it should be the same as an acoustic/PA amp right? Sure in a perfect world, but I don't live there, but I haven't tried a Katana so I cant say how that amp responds, But I know for a fact if I wanted to go a gig I'd grab it before I loaded up my mixer, monitors, Laptop, a bunch of cords and some other toys, then have to set it all up, No, a guitar or two an amp, toys if needed and a couple of cords, I'm outta here, In and out, If you don't like the way my violin being played on an electric guitar through an electric guitar amp sounds, There's the door, don't let it hit you in the ass on your way out, Will the mixer and monitors sound better? Sure, But I'm just here for the free grub and beer, like I care, , As to 100w too big for bedroom practice? That's what the volume knob is for, SS amps really don't care, and in my opinion sound better at lower volumes rather than cranked and ugly SS clipping, Tube amps? Gee I thought that's what the master volume was for, Still get that nice tube clip without rattling your neighbors windows and setting off car alarms in the area,
Last edited by nastytroll at Dec 5, 2016,
#23
Depends on the amp.I had a 100w Marshall half stack in my man cave at one point.That sounded shit a low vols and I couldn't turn it up past 1.5.
Just try it out before you buy at low vols.It may be fine.
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#24
Quote by gu1tarn00b
I currently own a 20 watt amplifier and I'm thinking of buying another but if I do it would be 100 watts because the 50 watt is lacking a lot of features. Is 100 watt too loud for bedroom practice? If I turn it down to a reasonable volume will it sound weird?
One of the big limitations with big amps and lots of 12" speakers, is you have to reach a certain volume, (power dissipation), before the amp can overcome the "cone compliance". The compliance is the material between the primary "cone" and speaker frame. In other words, the part which attaches the cone to the frame. There is always a power level which must be applied, until the resistance to come movement is negligible, or not noticeable. So, if you're trying to move a couple of twelves you need to apply a decent amount of "oomph" from the amp to get them moving. Every time you add more speakers, they move more air, but require more power. And pretty soon the police are at your door.

The foregoing says nothing of the fact, tube amps in particular, are cherished for the amount and "quality" of distortion they produce. That distortion doesn't really happen without the knobs on the front being set around "twelve o'clock high", at which point you're already well over 100db SPL.

So, do as you like, but it's not really practical or prudent.

Besides, if we're talking about a 20 watt tube amp (?), a lot of those little guys, seem to be cherished buy a lot of great players for recording. Hint, the mic and recording console can make them sound like a full stack, if that's what your heart desires.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Dec 6, 2016,
#25
Outside Octaves
I considered getting a kemper & monitors specifically for this same purpose, but eventually went with what The heart wants (another 100 w tube amp).
Back on topic though, I originally got a mesa mini rec because of the portability and power rating, as well as power adjustabily option. To me its shit with volume below conversation level, and the power adjusting features compromise too much tone. Ironically my EVH 5150 III 50 watt sounds full and lush even on 1. Same for the Marshall JVM 410. I guess its all that preamp tube saturation.
#26
Quote by EyeballPaul
Depends on the amp.I had a 100w Marshall half stack in my man cave at one point.That sounded shit a low vols and I couldn't turn it up past 1.5.
Just try it out before you buy at low vols.It may be fine.


Marshalls can be lowered to 50 watt, did you try pulling out the two outer power tubes?

I have a 50 watt Marshall that sounds great at half (it has 25 watt mode) but I always add an overdrive in front, but each amp is different.

I have no issue with the Mesa Mini Recto at bedroom practice levels although it sounds better with a bit more volume. I even compared it to a big Mesa Triple Recto and they're quite close through the same cabs, so I couldn't really call it a tone compromise.
#27
Quote by diabolical
Marshalls can be lowered to 50 watt, did you try pulling out the two outer power tubes?

I have a 50 watt Marshall that sounds great at half (it has 25 watt mode) but I always add an overdrive in front, but each amp is different.

I have no issue with the Mesa Mini Recto at bedroom practice levels although it sounds better with a bit more volume. I even compared it to a big Mesa Triple Recto and they're quite close through the same cabs, so I couldn't really call it a tone compromise.

Thats what I forgot to mention, the mini was probably ideally intended for a band context, hence the touchy bolume taper at full power. What i mean by compromise is setting the modern channel at half power doesnt sound as good to me as full power(its all subjective), and either way, i imagine it wouldnt fly in an apartment haha, but ymmv. I do agree that it holds its own with the triple rec, & would choose the mini over the triple any day (i had a triple but just didnt get on with it).
#28
i know i have over 1000w of tube amps in this room at the moment. master volumes work for a reason. i don't have problems.
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