#1
Hello

Here is the situation:
I have never played a guitar before, and I want to learn to play electric guitar. I have a cheap electric guitar (About 100 euro's) from the Phoenix brand. and I don't really feel like taking lessons.

Where to I start, what do I do to begin?
Hints and tips are very appreciated!

Thanks in advance.
#2
youtube!
'16 Gibson LP Standard T, '15 Epi LP Standard with 57/57+ Gibbys
Blackstar S1-45, a few pedals.
#4
Quote by AceWayyz
and I don't really feel like taking lessons.

It really is the best way to get started though. Many professional musicians would argue that it is the only way to properly get started.

Look at it this way; what do you call someone who can speak a language but doesn't know how to read or write? They would be illiterate.

What do you call a person who knows how to physically play the guitar but couldn't play a G chord if you asked them to? They would be musically illiterate.

One very popular site for online lessons is justinguitar.com. Online lessons are not as good as guided instruction by a physical teacher, but it's free and you can learn at entirely your own pace.

I mean how are you even supposed to begin playing guitar without any guided instruction whatsoever.
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I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend
#5
Quote by AceWayyz
I don't really feel like taking lessons.

Where to I start, what do I do to begin?


Start by taking lessons.

You can watch YouTube and all that after you get going, but you want to develop GOOD habits from the get-go and not have to break them (or make excuses for them) later on.
#6
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
It really is the best way to get started though. Many professional musicians would argue that it is the only way to properly get started.

Look at it this way; what do you call someone who can speak a language but doesn't know how to read or write? They would be illiterate.

What do you call a person who knows how to physically play the guitar but couldn't play a G chord if you asked them to? They would be musically illiterate.

One very popular site for online lessons is justinguitar.com. Online lessons are not as good as guided instruction by a physical teacher, but it's free and you can learn at entirely your own pace.

I mean how are you even supposed to begin playing guitar without any guided instruction whatsoever.


The problem is that i'm only 16, and I live in belgium, so I don't have a car yet. And all the "schools'" or teachers are like 30 minutes away from here. And the ones that are close only teach acoustic guitar. I want to take lessons eventually, but I just can't right now.
#7
Quote by AceWayyz
The problem is that i'm only 16, and I live in belgium, so I don't have a car yet. And all the "schools'" or teachers are like 30 minutes away from here. And the ones that are close only teach acoustic guitar. I want to take lessons eventually, but I just can't right now.

The skills you will learn in acoustic guitar lessons are going to be 100% applicable and relevant to electric guitar. Especially when you are only beginning to learn to learn open chords, fundamental scales and understanding some of the basic concepts of sheet music.

Tell your teachers that you intend to be an electric player and give examples of the sorts of bands you like. They might be able to steer you in the general direction towards learning some of the scales and progressions commonly found of those sorts of music.
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I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend
#8
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
The skills you will learn in acoustic guitar lessons are going to be 100% applicable and relevant to electric guitar. Especially when you are only beginning to learn to learn open chords, fundamental scales and understanding some of the basic concepts of sheet music.

Tell your teachers that you intend to be an electric player and give examples of the sorts of bands you like. They might be able to steer you in the general direction towards learning some of the scales and progressions commonly found of those sorts of music.


But i'm just not intrested in learning the acoustic guitar first, I've always learned, do something because you like doing it, not because you must
#9
There are plenty of self taught professionals. Not everyone learns the same, having said that I would still recommend taking some lessons.

About youtube videos. There's just so many. What I've found is its best to try a lot of them, mainly due to some of the instructors I can't stand. So if there is someone who you like their personality stick with them. I tend to be more interested if I like the instructor, if he/she is too goofy or talks too much about themselves I tend to click onto the next one.

Generally speaking you should learn these to start
-basic chords
-finger exercises (huge benefit from this, don't skip)
-major and minor pentatonic scales, Am Pentatonic is a good place to start IMO

<--not an instructor
'16 Gibson LP Standard T, '15 Epi LP Standard with 57/57+ Gibbys
Blackstar S1-45, a few pedals.
#10
I know a few friends who can play the guitar a little, is it good to ask them? Or is it bad to ask someone who is still learning themselves?
#11
Quote by AceWayyz
But i'm just not intrested in learning the acoustic guitar first, I've always learned, do something because you like doing it, not because you must
The very basics of learning acoustic and electric guitar are identical to one another. The intervals, basic mechanics of playing, sheet music structure, chords and scales are all the same. For your purposes, it'll be good enough to get you started.

You absolutely must learn how to do these sorts of things before you can even begin to know how to play anything. It doesn't matter if it's acoustic or electric, they're absolutely essential.
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I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend
#12
IMO you can learn something from everyone, so don't be afraid to ask anyone for help. But instructors know what to look for, like how you position your thumb, how you hold the strings, how to hold the pick, etc.
'16 Gibson LP Standard T, '15 Epi LP Standard with 57/57+ Gibbys
Blackstar S1-45, a few pedals.
#13
To expand on what T00DEEPBLUE said, a good teacher is like gold. I have been playing music since the mid-1970s, and at one point, I could read music. Some of that involved formal lessons, some didn't. But I can't read music well these days, and I'm thus functionally musically illiterate. I can play symphonies from memory, but if asked, I couldn't play "a G chord".

A teacher will spot flaws in your technique; will notice when you're not playing a tune in the correct time signature; will be able to fill in gaps in understanding. That translates into faster learning because you won't have to unlearn bad habits.
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Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#14
Quote by dannyalcatraz
But I can't read music well these days, and I'm thus functionally musically illiterate.


Hey I play guitar but I can't read music does that mean I am guitarded?

I can read tab though

I am basically self taught I learned a lot from other guitar players that I knew, I wish I could have had lessons when I was starting out but I had no income and my parents wouldn't spring for it.
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#16
Quote by AceWayyz
But i'm just not intrested in learning the acoustic guitar first, I've always learned, do something because you like doing it, not because you must


absolutely, i agree 100%.

check out justin guitar, as t00deepblue said.

while the basics are the same on electric and acoustic, it still feels a fair bit different.

would any of those acoustic teachers mind if you went to lessons with them and just brought your electric? that might be worth asking about, if they aren't too awkward to get to.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

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Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

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Et tu, br00tz?
#17
AceWayyz

For lead guitar, I recommend learning E minor pentatonic scale. learn all 5 positions up to the 12th fret, once you learn that, learn from the 12th fret & beyond.

For rhythm guitar, learn how to play basic power chords. Learn the major scale 1 major - 2minor - 3minor - 4 major - 5 major - 6minor -7 diminished.

The major scale is also known as Doe, Ray, Me.
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#18
Justinguitar is all you need for your first year, he will teach you all the basic chords, strumming, start you off on scales. After that you can stick around and look at his intermediate stuff or just go off and wonder youtube, tabs, or play along to songs you like. Plenty of people giving lessons on youtube but honestly theres no better place to start than Justinguitar
#19
Get used to the absolute basics and practice regularly.

Fretting notes, picking notes, basic techniques, basic chord strumming and then try to find some easy songs to learn from tablature. Keep practicing what you learn and steadily expand your knowledge with more chords, scales, basic music theory and more advanced songs.
#20
Quote by AceWayyz
But i'm just not intrested in learning the acoustic guitar first, I've always learned, do something because you like doing it, not because you must


The arguments are complicated. I agree with TDB that the basics are the same on acoustic and electric, but I've always thought that it is better to learn on the kind of instrument that interests and motivates you if possible. I'm a very long-term acoustic player who came to electric late in life, and I've never been able to play electric well because of the differences in attack, sustain, damping, touch etc. IMO, you really should look for someone who can teach you electric, and has similar interests to yours. Another possibility is to get your lessons off Youtube, and get someone to coach you in technique rather than teach you in a more formal sense.
#21
^ Yeah. (Some) Acoustic specialists are keen to point out that electric players have sloppy technique or whatever, and that they can instantly tell a mainly-electric player when he/she plays acoustic, but that kind of cuts both ways. I can normally tell an acoustic specialist who's playing electric, too.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#23
I don't know. The problem I can immediately think of is, who would we get to decide who's good at both? You'd have to be good at both yourself to really have an informed opinion on the subject
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#25
Haha yeah, agreed 100%. I didn't mean to suggest that informed opinions were always right, either. And even among (genuinely) informed opinions, people will disagree.

I just meant that if you had that thread, the acoustic specialists would be complaining about the acoustic choices of the electric specialists, and vice-versa.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?