#1
I am really struggling with amps. I curently have a Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier. I play anything from blues to rock and even a little metal for fun. Performance is more rock. First my issue with my dual rectifier is it is so loud it's tough to play at home. I know I could use a practice amp but I want to practice on what I play. I thought of going to a Marshal DLS 100H. My mesa is the older version withought the 50 watt setting. Am I really downgrading by doing this. I like the Marshal tone. I also thought of an attenuator but many guys have told me that is not a good idea for te am. any help or advice would be great!
#2
The Marshall isnt going to be more quiet than your Mesa. As for attenuation I dont think that is necessary for modern amps like a DSL or a Recto. Just use your master volume.

As for which one would be better I mean it all depends on the sounds youre looking for. It sounds like you dont play much metal and mostly play rock so maybe the Marshall might be voiced more to your liking.

If anything try out a DSL and some other amps and see if you like it better than your recto. If you do like it better then you will have your answer. They are both different sounding amps anyway and one isnt really better than the other.
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#3
I would also add that the older DSLs are better than the newer ones. Maybe having both the Mesa and Marshall would be a nice mixture. You would cover a lot of bases with both of them.
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#4
I have a Dual Rectifier Roadster so a bit different and I can get great tones at Loud Shouting volumes using the Master Volume. I find that the 100W vs. 50W setting has more to do with tracking and headroom than actual volume. Don't confuse wattage for volume.
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Amps:
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Peavey Vypyr 30
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#5
I moved from a TremoVerb to a DSL40. I like my tone more now.
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#6
Have you considered buying house on lots of land so you can use your mesa all the time?
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#7
The two tones are quite different, and it's entirely possible/feasible that you might like the Marshall tone better....or...you might not like it as much. You'd have to try one to be sure. And in any case, I don't think I'd look at it as a downgrade -- it's more of a "side"grade; not better, not worse, just different.

Having said that -- do you run a boost pedal (OD pedal set with its gain on minimum, level on max)? Most Tubescreamer-type OD pedals cut some of the bass from your guitar before it enters the preamp. This tightens/"un-muddies" your tone, and is most noticeable at low volumes. At higher volumes when the tubes start cooking and the speakers start moving, the mids and treble start to chime in and some of that muddiness goes away naturally, but an OD pedal tends to help the tone all the way through.

I just had to ask, because in my experience with 6505s at least, the OD pedal definitely improved the low-volume tone. Every time I've played a Rectifier, I thought they sounded pretty bad at low volumes, but once I turned them up a bit (already pretty loud though), they started to sound better and better. My 6505, unboosted, is kind of the same. Once it's LOUD it doesn't really need to be boosted to sound good if it's EQ'd right, but I prefer it boosted anyway. Recs benefit from a low-end cut in front of the amp even more than a 6505. Anyway, I might be preaching to the choir. But I thought I'd suggest trying it before ditching your Rec. You might also consider adding an EQ pedal to the loop because that can also really help tailor your low volume tone to where it needs to be.

The point is, getting a good tone at low volumes requires a different approach to EQing, but most of the time, these big metal amps can do it just fine. Of course, there's nothing like cranking them up good and proper, but we can't always do that...
Atmospheric dark metal w/ black and death metal influences:
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Last edited by KailM at Nov 30, 2016,
#8
Master volume is your friend. Use it liberally with every amp as needed. Just remember that when you turn down the volume you will need to adjust the tone settings to compensate for the way our ears work (Fletcher-Munson curve). When I turn down my Mesa, I increase the bass and adjust the mids to beef things back up a bit. Bam... Awesomeness!
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Nov 30, 2016,
#9
KailM Have you had any experience with Attenuators? That was a recommendation made by a friend of my who plays out weekly. He said that with 100 watts it may be usefule for live smaller gigs as well. Also, am I wrong in thinking that that the Marshall having a 50 or 100 watt selecotr would make it easier to play the tubes hotter at a low volume? I know with my mesa when I play live and crank it it sounds best. Thanks!
#10
I have a Altair 100w attenuator if you want it. $80 + shipping.

I find that both 50w and 100w are too much amp for the gigs I play these days. I love the way a 100 watter sounds wide open but I see no point in dragging around all that unused hardware and setting the amp master volume low. I want enough clean headroom to run with the drums and plenty of compression available for solos at less than wall peeling volumes. That works out to be about 20w for me these days. The tragic news is that we probably need more than one amp.

All amps sound best when cranked up but it is mostly the way our ears perceive sound. Louder seems to sound better until it becomes painful.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis
#11
Quote by ntopercer
KailM Have you had any experience with Attenuators? That was a recommendation made by a friend of my who plays out weekly. He said that with 100 watts it may be usefule for live smaller gigs as well. Also, am I wrong in thinking that that the Marshall having a 50 or 100 watt selecotr would make it easier to play the tubes hotter at a low volume? I know with my mesa when I play live and crank it it sounds best. Thanks!


No, I don't have any experience with them. I don't see any point to them with an amp like my 6505+ that gets most of its tone from the preamp. Preamps provide the same sound regardless of how loud they are amplified later. Though, the power tubes in my 6505 definitely affect the tone to some degree -- I know this because every year when I replace them the tone always sounds very noticeably better.

However -- I've always been able to get a very, very nice tone with that amp even at TV volumes and running through a 4 X 12 cab. I just run a boost pedal, drop the bass knob down a little, increase the mids and highs a bit, and it sounds great. I also run my Hall of Fame reverb pedal on the "room" setting with the decay set about halfway -- which helps to simulate the natural reverb I hear when I crank the thing. With all of that done, it truly sounds very, very good when quiet.

I think with a Rectifier at low volumes, it would be important to cut a lot of the bass and maybe increase the highs and mids a bit, plus that reverb trick helps it retain that "massive" quality that it gets when it's cranked.
Atmospheric dark metal w/ black and death metal influences:
(My Soundcloud page):

Pestilential Flood
Last edited by KailM at Dec 1, 2016,
#12
KailMOK, Thanks for all the great information. I will be spending some time tweaking settings this weekend!
#13
Attenuators are nice tools but you can also cook up your tubes much faster. Some guys I had in the studio blew tubes by constantly having the amp cranked to 11 and attenuating down the volume for that power tube crunch. Don't get me wrong, power tube crunch is very nice, once you hear it you'd know that you like it, but it depends if you want to trade shorter tube life for that.
Maybe buy attenuator from a place with return policy and see how you fare with it.