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#1
I spend a lot of time experimenting with recording guitars, close-miking specifically. The range of mics available, cabinets, speakers, and mic placements makes for effectively infinite combinations. Help a recording engineer out and post your "Eureka!" combinations.

What do you use to get your perfect sound?
What kind of guitar playing and mix are you trying to create?
What kind of music?

For instance: I am currently experimenting with recording metal rhythm guitars using a combination of a Shure SM57, perpendicular, 1 inch from the grille cloth, just off the dust cap of Celestion Heritage 65, mixed 50/50 with a Heil Sound PR-40, 45 degree angle, off the dust cap/aimed at it, 1 inch from the grille cloth, on a Celestion Greenback. Trying to decide if the Heil Sound will give that low end boom and high end sparkle that the Sennheiser MD421 is famous for, or if I should find an MD421. Love the Shure on its own but hoping to do something with a bit more dynamism and different from the usual metal guitars.
#2
Sennheiser e906 in the "High-Cut" position, parallel to the cab, about half an inch away from the grill cloth, directly over where the cone meets the dust cap. This allows a strong attack and midrange presence, but because the highs are "cut" it prevents the signal from being too bright/ice picky. I saw an engineer demo the Royer R121 using this method. I typically mic my AC30 on a Celestion Blue, for P&W music (levels of gain right before metal).
#3
Will Lane cool, I haven't actually talked to anyone who uses the e906 but I've heard good things about it from folks who are die-hard SM57 fans. My only extended experience with Sennheiser mics is with the e614, a really crisp SDC that I like for articulate brass work on a drumkit.
#4
For high gain tightness, I've yet to find something that can truly replace a good ol' SM57. I would usually add a second condenser mic to add some overall body. ULS and EB version of a 414 are great, but the newer XLS ones tend to be thinner.
MD421 with a Beyer 160 ribbon also works nice, but my absolute favorite combo is a Royer 101 with a Neumann 87. Big, fat, chunky, and great detail.
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#5
dead-fish Yeah, the SM57 is such a great workhorse. For DIY folks like myself, there are many applications. I still haven't found a mic I like the sound of better for close-miking snare drums than the 57.

I have had bad luck using condensers on heavy guitars. Always end up with an unwieldy signal and overtones galore. I do love the C414s but I tend to think of them more for acoustic guitars (soundhole or distant miking) and for vocals. With anything that has a constant presence in a mix, I avoid LDCs in general.

I'm real curious about ribbons, the only one I've toyed with is a Cascade FatHead, and I can find uses for it but it seems to be rather finicky about Preamps and the delicate nature of the ribbon makes me hesitant to really dig into what it can do. I feel like the ribbon would do more for me with a more percussive guitar sound, like blues lead or something.

Ha, if I could afford a Neumann 87 I suppose my whole gear frame of reference would be a bit different. Their reputation is formidable.
#7
diabolical where do you put the AT4040 and what kind of guitars? I've heard they aren't great for getting the right kind of low end resonance for guitars.
#9
Maromasqu For snares, I would much rather have an SM7. Beyer 201 works just as well as a 57 (with less of that annoying midrange 57's carry), but as far as an overall mic, I agree that the 57 is extremely versatile.

I remember positioning a Fathead about 5cm from a cleanish-overdriven amp quite a few times, it handles it fairly well. Would'nt use it on an acoustic though, it's just not really nice, for my ears.

What I do with the 414 is use it just for "extra-sound". I found out that I like it best when I mix it in -just- when I start to hear the overall body get bigger. Of course, correct phasing is key here. The dyn mic would always be far more pominent in the mix, and whenever I solo the 414, I get really surprised how low the mic actually is, but when I pull it out of the mix, the guitars just get sadder.

Yeah, 87's are fantastic. They're the LDC equivalent of a 57, they'll work just as good on pretty much everything. I work at a pretty big studio in my country, so I'm lucky to have access to really expensive shit. We had an original C12 kicking around for a while. How AKG turned that into a 414 is beyond me.
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#10
diabolical I've only heard that they're not great for low end, haven't experienced it myself. What I was told is that they provided an "unreliable" response depending on what you put them against. When you say on the grille, where in front of the speaker?

dead-fish Yeah I do want to try the Fathead with some clean guitars, I think it might work out well. On the list of many experiments to try. I did actually wind up using some tracks I laid down with it miking up an acoustic guitar. Had an LDC in front of the soundhole (Rode NT2A), and was mixing in an SDC (Shure SM81) perpendicular to the fretboard and pointed at the 12th fret and another SM81 pointed at the bridge but at a 45 degree angle from out in front of the butt of the guitar. This was working okay but I was only getting articulation from the SDCs and not any real body, and though the Rode was sounding great I needed something providing a bit of midrange body.

I tossed the Fathead into the fray, placing it perpendicular to the 10th fret and keeping it just beyond the performer's left hand, and found that it provided both the articulation I needed and the midrange tones I was looking for to complement the Rode. I was able to pull out the SM81s, which also made the performer a bit more comfortable, and that's certainly also a significant benefit. The only downside was that I couldn't use any preamps with the Fathead. Had to go dry, or else I'd get a low hum that was too present to ignore.

Love that description of your use of the 414, that's exactly how I like to use mics for "room sound". The fact that I keep them that low typically makes me so hesitant to raise them up higher in a recording of a drumkit, but of course the room sound is so important for a kit. Typically I don't even have the opportunity to do that anyway however, as I do primarily metal drums and the close-mics overpower the room mics in the mix.
#11
Well, I've used them on a 5150 for a very long session with a metal band at insane volumes. The main mic was the SM57 in standard mic position, but I usually go between "bright and soft" so maybe about two fingers away from the center of the cone.
The AT4040 was right at the same position but coming up from above, maybe something like this (but the AT4040 is a big diaphragm so it was with its flat side towards speaker):
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I also did the Fredman 30 degree or so from the side, the AT4040 being the side mic:

or just one foot away from the cab for ambience.

On one session I also had it face backwards as that is where it captured the best room ambience, something similar to Mark Knopfler's iconic sound which was a total mistake:
http://www.soundonsound.com/people/classic-tracks-dire-straits-money-nothing
(read "Signature Sounds").

@Maromasqu - try metal drums with some room sound, I don't see a reason why you shouldn't experiment. It doesn't always have to be so close miked. That's one of the reasons why some of the 80s stuff sounds so good, it had a bit of a room sound. The new drum production methods in metal usually bore a hole through my head, everything is so fake.
#12
diabolical yep I do enjoy using room sound on drums when I can, as it's nice and organic. When working with a metal group the consensus (evidenced by their choices of reference tracks) typically favors clarity and impact over atmosphere. I do personally love post metal, black metal, and recently blackgaze has been making its way into my own projects. So I'm hoping to experiment further with more comprehensive room mic sounds.

Of course the more I do room sound, or the more I back mics away from guitar cabinets, the more I wish I had a live room. Hoping to move in the next year or so and build something.
#13
Well, the lack of a live room will do you in

I have a sitting room and a den that are close to my "office" which doubles as studio so I run cables and blast stuff in there as much as I need as both are a few feet away. One is hardwood, the other carpet so they both sound good. Marshall JCM900 that I have especially loves being played on anything over 8 on the master volume and it just opens up incredibly, so I blast that usually in one of these two rooms (carpeted for rhythm, hardwood for leads) via reamp box when there's noone in the house.
#14
Quote by Maromasqu
I spend a lot of time experimenting with recording guitars, close-miking specifically. The range of mics available, cabinets, speakers, and mic placements makes for effectively infinite combinations. Help a recording engineer out and post your "Eureka!" combinations.

What do you use to get your perfect sound?
What kind of guitar playing and mix are you trying to create?
What kind of music?

For instance: I am currently experimenting with recording metal rhythm guitars using a combination of a Shure SM57, perpendicular, 1 inch from the grille cloth, just off the dust cap of Celestion Heritage 65, mixed 50/50 with a Heil Sound PR-40, 45 degree angle, off the dust cap/aimed at it, 1 inch from the grille cloth, on a Celestion Greenback. Trying to decide if the Heil Sound will give that low end boom and high end sparkle that the Sennheiser MD421 is famous for, or if I should find an MD421. Love the Shure on its own but hoping to do something with a bit more dynamism and different from the usual metal guitars.


The Heil will not give you that MD421 sound. It's a boxier 57.

There's more to this than the mics themselves...
1) What pre-amps?
2) What tone do you want?
3) What is the bass doing in the track?
4) How are the drums tuned in pitch?
5) Is the rhythm track fast and articulate, or slower and more riffy?
6) How proficient is the guitarist at controlling his instrument?
7) How many tracks are being layered for reach rhythm part... 1? 2? 4?
8) What overall tonal quality do you want for the track? Dark and brooding, clear and bold?
9) What space are you recording in?

There's a lot of questions, which will cause more questions. The 'old standby' is the 57 on cone, but everything else is accessory. You don't NEED any other mics, per se, but what options are available to you?

You could go pure Albini and put a D112 and a SDC on the same cone 6 inches out and combine them to balance between low and high information in an interesting way

You could do the (whatever his name is) with the 2 57s at 40 degrees.

You could Bob Rock it with a 57 and 421 on the cone and a 414/4040 a foot back from them.

You could The Chemist it with a HEiL HE30 and 57 on the cone and a big fat ribbon 6 inches back.

These will all give varying results. Experiment with it, as there's no correct way to do it. You could even pop the back off your cabinet and mic the back of the speaker with an SM58. That can be quite interesting as well.
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#15
the chemist Yep indeed the possibilities are effectively endless, and everything is so interrelated that there are no simple answers. Like anyone else I have limited time and can't possibly explore all options in all situations, so I'm really looking for ideas based on others' moments of epiphany. Not as an answer to my own situation, but as roads to explore and learn on my own.

These setups you list are great info, feels like I've encountered a couple of them before but yeah, this is exactly the sort of thing I'm looking for. I wish I didn't find good uses for just about every mic I buy. If I sold them more often, I could afford to try more new ones.
#16
For metal: 57, on axis, dust cap edge, 0-2" from the grille cloth. This is the classic Andy Sneap move. Failing this, add another 57, lined up with the first, but 45 degrees off axis. This is the Fredman technique.
For rock: 57+Royer R121, 57 near the dust cap edge, R121 on the cone.

I've tried MD421s a bunch of times and literally not once have they done anything I like.
Current Gear:
LTD MH-400
PRS SE Custom 24 (Suhr SSH+/SSV)
Ibanez RG3120 Prestige (Dimarzio Titans)
Squier Vintage Modified 70s Jazz V
Audient iD22 interface
Peavey Revalver 4, UAD Friedman BE100/DS40
Adam S3A monitors
Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
Last edited by oneblackened at Dec 7, 2016,
#17
I like the way proguitarshop records their demos, if I had an r121 I'm sure I would use it on practically all my guitar tones:


But for metal tones I'll basically always go an sm57 on the edge of the dust cap - between 0-3 inches away. A second m57 (Freidman method), or a m421 (mixed in under the sm57 to provide some fullness) can help if I'm not happy with just the single mic.

But generally I like the sm57 up front, with a a descent condenser or ribbon between 6 inches to a foot away.
RIP Gooze

cats
Last edited by mulefish at Dec 11, 2016,
#18
mulefish awesome vid thanks for posting. Yeah, those Royer 121s have a great reputation. I've never worked with one myself, but it sounds like oneblackened has one. What's your experience with it been like, Mr. Blackened?

Though I have several grand sunk into mics, I think I have a hard time spending a thousand bucks on a mic. When it comes to guitars, I never spend that much. Finding a great axe for a few hundred bucks isn't so hard if you're willing to go out and play a bunch first. As for amps, I do spend more but only when I'm real sure that it's what I've got to have.

But mics, *sigh*. I dunno. There always seems to be good ways to find a sound I can be really happy with by juggling some of the units I have, and none of them cost more than $400 new.

I've also read that the Beyer M160 is a good competitor for the Royer 121, and it's half the price. So there's that...
#19
Once you hear what a quality mic does to a session, or quality mics en masse, you might change your mind. Same thing with guitars. There are small subtle things that cheap guitars and cheap mics don't capture, or attenuate wrong, when you pile that track after track on a recording, it starts to show.

I did a session where the artist brought down a boatload of C414, U87s, etc. and since I had so many I decided to swap the regular drum mic sert which was middle of the road Beyers, with AT4040s as overheads, SM57 on the snare. Instead of that we did C414s on every tom, U87s as overheads, and some other high end mics I can't quite remember now and the sounds was "wow" as opposed to the pretty good sounds we were getting...almost like you were getting your ears cleaned...and not that the sound was bad before that, we thought we were getting very good drum sounds.
#20
diabolical Yep! Agree. When I've had a chance to work with nice mics, it's always been a joy. For my home studio, it's just tough justifying large purchases like that. Not to say I won't...

Indeed, regarding cheap gear. The experience I've managed to get so far has really helped me in finding better gear even within the lower price range.

To date I've only ever seen a U87 once, let alone work with one. Had some C414s in my hands for a while though, and was quite impressed. I don't own a pair yet but I've been surprisingly well served by my other LDCs, a pair of Rode NT2As. Pretty much useless for room sound or percussion but vocals and acoustic strings really come through nicely.
#21
Maromasqu It's too dark on its own IME and the proximity effect on it is NUTS, but it blends very nicely with a 57.
Current Gear:
LTD MH-400
PRS SE Custom 24 (Suhr SSH+/SSV)
Ibanez RG3120 Prestige (Dimarzio Titans)
Squier Vintage Modified 70s Jazz V
Audient iD22 interface
Peavey Revalver 4, UAD Friedman BE100/DS40
Adam S3A monitors
Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#23
Ribbons in general have crazy proximity effect. It's just in their nature.
Current Gear:
LTD MH-400
PRS SE Custom 24 (Suhr SSH+/SSV)
Ibanez RG3120 Prestige (Dimarzio Titans)
Squier Vintage Modified 70s Jazz V
Audient iD22 interface
Peavey Revalver 4, UAD Friedman BE100/DS40
Adam S3A monitors
Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#25
I did an album for a friend of mine where we recorded the guitars like this:

Left side: (first guitar)
- Amp miked with Shure SM 57
- DI track reamped through JamUp iPad app using the Randall Treadplate model
Right side: (doubled guitar)
- amp miked with Sennheiser MD 421
- DI track reamped through JamUp iPadd app using the Marshall JCM800 model.
They are panned and leveled so that the modeled amp is somewhat dominant and is panned furthest towards the outside, and the miked amp is slightly lower and panned about 2/3-3/4 of the way.

In both cases, the SM57 and the MD421 were basically right up on the grille and a little towards the outer edge of the cone, pretty much perpendicular to the grille cloth.

Here were the results:
https://soundcloud.com/80smetalfan95/time-bomb-blonde-july-9

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
Last edited by axemanchris at Jan 1, 2017,
#26
axemanchris awesome details. I am just starting to get into reamping myself, and love it. The ability to cut down the number of performances of a single guitar riff was the selling point, as I wanted to keep it one performance per side like you've done in your example there. But now of course I'm finding tons of potential for more experimentation.

I'm curious about using an SM57 on one side and an MD421 on the other side. Did you find that the difference in tones from the two mics created a desirable separation of sound, or were the reamped tracks needed to temper/rebalance a lopsided sound? i.e., was the Treadplate model brighter/boomier than the JCM800 model?
#27
Maromasqu TBH, I don't really remember. It was six months ago. We also used a Sennheiser MD441 and a Sennheiser e835 and did not keep those tracks. I love both of those mics for different reasons, but for this thing on this day, the 57 and the 421 were the clear winners.

The background of this came from an article I had read on the recording of White Zombie's "More Human than Human", which has, IMHO, one of the most incredible guitar sounds ever. They didn't do as much layering (which I thought for sure they must have done) as much as they did miking a whole bunch of different amp combinations. The wisdom there is that it is the variety of tones layered together that add the thickness more so than the number of layers. So that was what we went for. Two different amp models, two different mics on a "real" amp, and two different performances.

Also, at the time, I had been working on transitioning my live rig to an iRig > iPad > DI to PA setup and really liking the results I was getting from the JamUP app. So, I thought, hey... let's try it.

For extra points..... the amp itself was a modelling amp. Not a line 6.... a Roland Cube I think.

Who says you can't make guitars sound good with modelling?

In short, I found that it wasn't so much which mic/model sounded thicker or whatever, as much as it was the overall effect of the different combinations.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#28
Article is here... http://www.jyuenger.com/?p=4526

"The setup for the album was the rack of gear you see in the photos and four half-stacks : A Randall Century 200 head through a Randall Jaguar cabinet, a Randall Century 200 head through a Mesa cabinet, a Mesa Triple Rec through a Mesa cabinet, and a Marshall Valvestate ( I was in love with that crazy transistor-metal sound that Tommy from Prong had ) through .. I don’t remember, either a Randall or a Mesa. These were all going at once, but each cab was miced with only a single Shure SM57, and then the four signals were summed in the console and sent to one track on tape. I was determined to achieve the sound I had in my head, and I was quite picky ( and a little bratty ) about the tones we were getting : there was quite a bit of moving the mics around, and I made Terry and Ulrich do quite a lot of radical EQing. I didn’t understand much about recording at this point, so I didn’t grasp that the general practice when recording most sound sources, especially electric guitars, is to use EQ as little as possible so as to leave room for EQing if it needs to be done during mixdown .. and that it’s a point of pride with recording engineers to attain a desired sound by selecting the proper microphones and positioning them correctly, which is a big deal, because when a mic is jammed right up in an amp’s speaker cone, moving it just half an inch can change the sound drastically."

And yeah, we did a fair bit of moving mics around to find the sweet spots.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
Last edited by axemanchris at Jan 3, 2017,
#29
Layering amp sounds or even using multimic setup has worked well for me, sometimes it is cool to layer an AC30 at half distorted at say 20% compared to a blasting overdriven metal head. This kind of experimentation was really easy to do in pro studios as they had all these amps lined up in the live rooms, miced up and ready to record, so you could just patch things in and out, akin to what Michael Wagener does with his Creation Audio Labs MW1 direct-injection rack:
http://www.premierguitar.com/articles/19360-studio-legends-michael-wagener?page=3

There was a question about MD421 vs SM57 - if you're using it on the same amp it probably won't be enough to differentiate the L/R side for the most part. You could get away with using same amp if you have two different sounding guitars and dial in the amp differently, something like say PRS with passives on one side and Jackson Soloist on the other side, or Gibson/Fender L/R combination.

One of the reasons why I invested in a few small tube amps is exactly this - you can get many different sounds in around $400-$600 range of amps that are great for recording. I also have several 2x12 and 1x12 speakers that are easy to work with and you can just flip between them when you need the right tone.
#30
Totes agreed, regarding layering amp sounds. Some of the best tones I've gotten on record have been from this. I find it interesting to prompt the guitar player to play through a rig they don't like for a layer. Something that doesn't feel like it responds well enough for them. Not because it makes them play differently (though it does), but because I figure if the response feels off to them, it probably is quite different from their main rig which I've already recorded.

One thing I haven't been able to really make come to good use is EQing different amps within a layer differently. For instance, using a more invasive HPF on a performance played through a 5150, and a more invasive LPF on the same performance played through a Marshall JCM800, layered directly on top of one another. The idea being to emphasize certain aspects of each amp's response. In the end, it always ends up just sounding subtractive and not in a good way.
#31
Quote by Maromasqu
Totes agreed, regarding layering amp sounds. Some of the best tones I've gotten on record have been from this. I find it interesting to prompt the guitar player to play through a rig they don't like for a layer. Something that doesn't feel like it responds well enough for them. Not because it makes them play differently (though it does), but because I figure if the response feels off to them, it probably is quite different from their main rig which I've already recorded.

One thing I haven't been able to really make come to good use is EQing different amps within a layer differently. For instance, using a more invasive HPF on a performance played through a 5150, and a more invasive LPF on the same performance played through a Marshall JCM800, layered directly on top of one another. The idea being to emphasize certain aspects of each amp's response. In the end, it always ends up just sounding subtractive and not in a good way.


That's the inherent issue with micing multiple amps. Phase relations are hard to handle if you're not sure of what exactly you're doing. Most often, you'll want to buss all the recorded amps into 1 track and EQ/compress that aux track. To mix the amps, simply adjust their levels individually in place. That works the best for me as it allows the amps to breathe a bit and keeps the phase relations relatively stable.

Dropping the ass-end off of a 5150, for example, may cause the midrange to loose some of it's girth, causing some weird phase-like interplay with... a Single Rectifier (I've done this, it's disgusting). Personally, I hate micing multiple amps and prefer to multi-mic one cabinet, to ensure that the speakers are in phase. Trust me, sometimes you think that your mics are out of phase but it's actually the 2 different cabinets and amps. In the room you may not notice it, but on tape/DAW, it's super obvious. Plus, you may get interference and shit that one amp may not pickup. For example (and a great story from a few years ago) I was recording a band and between takes I was A/B comparing the 2 different amp's noise to determine which one was hissing. At the same time, the guitarist was outside of the studio in the hall on a cordless phone talking to his girlfriend. The JSX didn't have a bad noise floor (very nice built-in noise gate), but the Randall that was also being ran had a great noise floor that sounded like the guitarist's girlfriend talking about her humid holes. Well, determining we had paygold on our hands, we recorded the phone conversation into PT and when the guitarist came back proceeded to loop it over and over.

He got real mad.
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#32
Quote by Maromasqu
One thing I haven't been able to really make come to good use is EQing different amps within a layer differently. For instance, using a more invasive HPF on a performance played through a 5150, and a more invasive LPF on the same performance played through a Marshall JCM800, layered directly on top of one another. The idea being to emphasize certain aspects of each amp's response. In the end, it always ends up just sounding subtractive and not in a good way.

Have you tried using a linear phase eq in this scenario? I'll have to try this out myself I think.

Quote by the chemist
the Randall that was also being ran had a great noise floor that sounded like the guitarist's girlfriend talking about her humid holes. Well, determining we had paygold on our hands, we recorded the phone conversation into PT and when the guitarist came back proceeded to loop it over and over.

RIP Gooze

cats
#33
I have an SM57 and an Audix i5 and I like to have one an inch from the grill cloth, and the other 3 inches back, both on axis and just off centre. When doing multiple takes, I swap the mics around (as well as swapping tubes/pedals etc). I get phase issues when the SM57 is the closer mic, but a bit of eq boost on the high end fixes it.
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#34
I've been experimenting with this lately:

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#35
What are we looking at there, chemist? It looks like a 2x12 cab with a dynamic right on the grille (I don't recognize either rmic, though, exactly... is the dynamic one of the "Blue" mics?) and a condenser (tube... what kind?), with each mic fairly close to the edge of the cone and more-or-less on axis.

Are you happy with the results?

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
Last edited by axemanchris at Jan 15, 2017,
#36
That's a Blue The Ball (active dynamic) on the left at a 45 degree angle to the cone center, and a P12 on the right about 6 inches back flat to the middle of the speaker. The angle makes it look strange.

I'm still experimenting with placements and pickup patterns on the P12, but this seems to be getting places ATM. I've found that Fig-8 on that big tuber adds some life to an otherwise super tight guitar sound. Once I've found the perfect place, I'll get some samples.
Quote by Watterboy
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#37
Quote by the chemist
I've found that Fig-8 on that big tuber adds some life to an otherwise super tight guitar sound. Once I've found the perfect place, I'll get some samples.

Interesting! What, if anything, do you do to condition the room/reflections behind the fig-8 mic?

Quote by the chemist
He got real mad.

That's AWESOME. Reminds me of a time I once sat in a fellow's basement performing acoustic guitar. He had 2 C414s on me, one in front of me and one over my shoulder. The mix in the headphones was huge, and I could hear all the sounds going on in the rest of the house -- including his wife taking a serious dump. I pointed it out to him, probably a bad idea, because he was the only one in the control room I couldn't hear laughing.

Also, interesting note regarding using a compressed buss track of guitars. I have never done that. I've always thought of heavily distorted guitars as being so compressed to begin with that the only compression they'd ever need was in the mastering.

mulefish Nope I have not tried a linear phase EQ. TBH I haven't really messed with those much, typically figuring that I should get to a place where a regular EQ appears to be causing phase issues before I try to fix such a problem. But yeah, this might be just that.
#38
Quote by Maromasqu
Interesting! What, if anything, do you do to condition the room/reflections behind the fig-8 mic?



Nothing, really. As my cabinet is in a room that contains a couch and some rugs, I find they do enough to dampen it down. What I find it adds is when I record (as in, I'm playing) is some of the pick attack into the sound, which adds some really neat sounds into the song. Adds some real snap into a riff. It also gives some life, better sounding than adding a slight reverb (or in a modelling plugin, that disgusting Room tone setting). I can change the pattern to be less 8 and more supercard, or go the other way and go full on omni. So many options that I can experiment without changing the mic position.
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Do you have any dilithium crystals or fresh warm dumps for sale
#39
Beyerdynamic M201TG. That mic sounds glorious on just about everything. I also like the SM57 or Audix i5 as a second mic at a 45* angle. The Sennheiser e609 is cool for clean guitar, as well - never been a huge fan of it for distorted tones.

I've tried the MD421 several times on guitar, never really been impressed. Sounds cool on toms, but it's an expensive mic for just toms... I'll stick with my SM57s or internal Audix mics there
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I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
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maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





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#40
Quote by MatrixClaw
Beyerdynamic M201TG. That mic sounds glorious on just about everything. I also like the SM57 or Audix i5 as a second mic at a 45* angle. The Sennheiser e609 is cool for clean guitar, as well - never been a huge fan of it for distorted tones.

I've tried the MD421 several times on guitar, never really been impressed. Sounds cool on toms, but it's an expensive mic for just toms... I'll stick with my SM57s or internal Audix mics there


Try mixing a 421, 57, and an LDC together.
Quote by Watterboy
Do you have any dilithium crystals or fresh warm dumps for sale
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