#1
I've been realizing lately that the more that I mix and playback my recordings, whatever I am looking at while listening to the music makes a HUGE difference in how I perceive the sound and also affects my ability to perceive GOOD and BAD things about the mix. I'll try to explain as best as I can:

And while I'm on this topic, I think this is part of the explanation for why plugins with fancier GUIs sound "better" (they aren't necessarily better).

If I listen to a song (doesn't have to be a mix of my own) in my DAW (Reaper), it tends to sound more flat, not very dimensional or exciting really, and I think I find it a bit more difficult to hear the instruments 'apart' from one another.
Now, if I listen to a song with a music video, or shit even just my windows media player visualizer, it sort of occupies my eyes and lets my ears have a new sensory priority, in a way. Suddenly, it sounds more like the sounds have physical space that they are occupying. If it is mixed well, I can clearly hear each individual piece, and it seems like I could reach out and touch it or something. Its actually extremely audibly pleasing listening this way, and I find that I catch mistakes or volume issues way more easily when I listen while staring at a visualizer.

So, I guess these are my questions:
1. Does this happen for anybody else here?
2. It is a pain in the ass to keep switching back and fourth between a DAW and a visualizer: is there any way you can think of to add a more visual element to Reaper (like a background visualizer of some sort? Something 'moving' and colors. I find that parametric EQs that show the spectral analysis aren't good enough, unfortunately).
3. Are there perhaps any other DAWs that incorporate a more visual approach? Would be awesome if sounds caused the visual movement/colors intensity, and you could sort of grip edit and manipulate them that way or something (pipe dream).
4. Am I crazy?

Thanks!
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#2
The placebo effect is definitely real. Ever tweaked a plugin and "heard" a difference only to discover that it is bypassed? Happens to everyone.

When you listen to music from your DAW, you are subconsciously used to hearing things that sound like your mixes. If you bounce out and play your track through iTunes, before you even compare it to a professionally mixed track you will likely perceive it differently purely because it is coming from iTunes instead of your DAW.

Not familiar with any DAWs that have visualisers in the way you are talking about, but I'd be interested to hear if anyone else knows of any.
#3
Quote by Random3
The placebo effect is definitely real. Ever tweaked a plugin and "heard" a difference only to discover that it is bypassed? Happens to everyone.

When you listen to music from your DAW, you are subconsciously used to hearing things that sound like your mixes. If you bounce out and play your track through iTunes, before you even compare it to a professionally mixed track you will likely perceive it differently purely because it is coming from iTunes instead of your DAW.

Not familiar with any DAWs that have visualisers in the way you are talking about, but I'd be interested to hear if anyone else knows of any.


I agree w u man - it definitely sounds different (perceived different) when you listen from itunes or whatever. But still not to the extent as when I use a visualizer. I think the only way I could make it work is if I had like a hardware desk mixing unit for 'mixing', but on my screen i was staring at a visualizer or something. Its an underrated tactic, I think. Something about seeing the interaction with colors and vibration helps you better gauge if you arent using enough bass or treble
Quote by suckmahnuts
Watterboy, I love you.

Quote by davrossss
You are now my favourite person on UG.....You write cool shit.

Quote by wannabestoner69