#1
Hello all. I'm new to this forum and the community and figured that I would get some advice from other guitarists out there on the internet that have been playing longer than me.

So this is the question, what do you think I should learn to help me progress in the best manner, from where I am now ?

This is where I'm at. I've been playing around 3 hours per day for two months, acoustic guitar.

I have been practicing mostly rhythm guitar. This is where I'm at.

Know the basic major and minor chords.
Know some 7th chords, 3 barre chords , and a few F chords, C chords like Caad9
Can switch between chords on tempo, using pivot fingers.
Can switch chords on time to a metronome at various BPM's from 60-120.
Can play 4 cover songs from beginning to end and sing along.
Wrote my first song
Palm Mute/Percussive Strike
At least 5 strum patterns
Understand the difference between quarter notes, eighth notes, and sixteenth notes.
Used the capo at 3rd and 5th fret with very enjoyable results
Really enjoying the rhythm and groove when I play expressively, to say the least I feel it in my heart & soul !!!!


Now, you , as my friend that I don't know yet, as the great guitarists you are all, can you advise me in what direction you think I should go to learn more and get better?

I see myself as the singer song writer in the future.

Riffs ? Pentatonic scales ? Finger picking ?

What direction should I be going in ? Help !~ I need somebody ~ ^_^
#2
Power chords dude. They sound amazing & a caveman can do it.
Some see the glass half full, others see the glass half empty. Me? I see that the glass is refillable.
#4
If you can play one power chord, you can play 12 total. Simply slide them up a fret & so on.

A, A#, B, C, C#, D, D#, E, F, F#, G, G# (back to A. 12 letters in the Chromatic scale)

Slide E5 up one fret & you're playing an F5 now, so on so forth.

Watch this video, master it. In 2-3 days you will sound decent on guitar.

Some see the glass half full, others see the glass half empty. Me? I see that the glass is refillable.
#7
I don't have any particular style that I am aiming for. I want to learn as much as possible from different styles and then have my own style emerge from my learning.

However , I love blue grass !!! Also. I LOVE rhythm guitar. So strum for sure. I have very little interest in lead guitar, but rhythm is a callin !

I'm aiming for the singer- song writer acoustic kind of deal. I want to eventually perform my own material at open mics
Last edited by tarotreadingsbyjohn at Dec 2, 2016,
#8
I was like you - started on acoustic and mastered a few basics. Was convinced I wanted to be an acoustic only player as I was into fingerpicking and stuff.

Then picked up a cheap electric and it opened up a whole new world for me and that was when I realised how much I loved rhythm.

I've only been playing on an electric for a couple of weeks but it's totally broadened my horizons and made me a better player overnight.

So i'd strongly recommend picking up a cheap electric and playing some rhythm stuff! Check out the Mayer style 'thumb over' chords - look at the tab for Waiting on the World to Change - as being played at the start of this video, good fun one to start with

#9
Quote by tarotreadingsbyjohn
I don't have any particular style that I am aiming for. I want to learn as much as possible from different styles and then have my own style emerge from my learning.

However , I love blue grass !!! Also. I LOVE rhythm guitar. So strum for sure. I have very little interest in lead guitar, but rhythm is a callin !

I'm aiming for the singer- song writer acoustic kind of deal. I want to eventually perform my own material at open mics


1) I would suggest learning learning songs that have small lead fills in the rhythm - see Neil Young "Needle and the Damage Done" for example. Jimi Hendrix is the reference point for advanced rhythm playing - "hey joe" is a great tune to play on acoustic.

2) You should learn some lead because it will make you a much better rhythm guitarist. The best rhythm players can move around chord progressions and do fills, which is basically lead playing.

3) Bluegrass rhythm technique is a great way to propel your rhythm playing - the basic idea is to hit the bass note first and then strum the rest of the chord (this is done very fast with fast chord changes) - check out Tony Rice's instructional video - it may be too much for you, but there is a section on rythm in there somewhere.
#10
Thank you all for your help, will be picking up a cheap electric. Keep the tips coming would love to hear from my fellow guitarists