Page 1 of 3
#1


Have you ever had, The Culture Shocks?

What things from other cultures or nations seem wrong to you, and perhaps more usefully, what ideas or customs from other cultures seem much better; that you'd like to see tried/implemented over where you are?
they're coming to take me away
ha-haaa
Last edited by Banjocal at Dec 3, 2016,
#2
Quote by Banjocal

What things from other cultures or nations seem wrong to you


japan
dirtbag ballet by the bins down the alley
as i walk through the chalet of the shadow of death
everything that you've come to expect


Last edited by Trowzaa at Dec 3, 2016,
#3
Quote by Trowzaa
japan
i thought this before i was informed that i am senpai. japans aight
Quote by korinaflyingv
On the come up we were listening to Grateful Dead and the music started passing through my bowel and out my arsehole as this violet stream of light. I shat music. It was beautiful.
#4
You know, for all of americas faults, the general 'being nice to everyone face-to-face' attitude that most people have is something that's sorely needed over here.
o()o

Quote by JamSessionFreak
yes every night of my entire life i go to bed crying because i wasnt born american
#5
Quote by EpiExplorer
You know, for all of americas faults, the general 'being nice to everyone face-to-face' attitude that most people have is something that's sorely needed over here.
not applicable to NJ.
mugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmug
#6
Quote by EpiExplorer
You know, for all of americas faults, the general 'being nice to everyone face-to-face' attitude that most people have is something that's sorely needed over here.


To hop on this a bit, in the northeastern bits of the US, everyone's a total asshole. Coming from the south it's a huge shock. Down here it's not okay to be an asshole to other people for no reason.

Quote by jakesmellspoo
not applicable to NJ.


NJ isn't part of the US.

It's part of hell.
Quote by Hal-Sephira

We all have the rights to be mad

So does you
Last edited by Victory2134 at Dec 3, 2016,
#8
Quote by Victory2134
To hop on this a bit, in the northeastern bits of the US, everyone's a total asshole. Coming from the south it's a huge shock. Down here it's not okay to be an asshole to other people for no reason.



I got a little bit of that in New York city but only because it was basically rush hour for all daylight hours. In the towns outside, such as Yonkers, they couldn't do enough for ya. Very nice people.
o()o

Quote by JamSessionFreak
yes every night of my entire life i go to bed crying because i wasnt born american
#9
Quote by Victory2134
NJ isn't part of the US.

It's part of hell.
oh no u didnt
mugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmugmug
#10
Quote by jakesmellspoo
oh no u didnt


he just doesnt understand

its a jersey thing u kno
o()o

Quote by JamSessionFreak
yes every night of my entire life i go to bed crying because i wasnt born american
#11
Quote by Victory2134
To hop on this a bit, in the northeastern bits of the US, everyone's a total asshole. Coming from the south it's a huge shock. Down here it's not okay to be an asshole to other people for no reason.



i totally agree with that, the last time i went to Philly, people will flip you off in the street for no reason, cuss you out if you bump into them on the sidewalk (instead of saying excuse me or sorry) or they'll roll down their windows just to call you an idiot if you drive too slow in traffic, etc lol i was surprised really... but i would expect that in NYC tbh.

in the south, everyone is so nice and chill down here, and most people you meet will try to be as nice as possible to you, it's just disciplined southern family friendly culture. in texas, it's pretty rare to meet a regular looking person who is just straight up rude for no reason, especially in random in public. (well, assuming that person isn't ghetto or the like)

other than that, i'm not really surprised at what backwards, messed up stuff goes on in other places around the world, especially 3rd- world countries with no boundaries for corrupt culture.
Quote by jrcsgtpeppers
There shall be a stop to this madness. The battle is not over. My tasty licks aren't going anywhere.

Quote by The_Blode
^ I've just realised if you say Simple Plan's 2011 effort "Get Your Heart On!" really fast in a Southern American accent, it sounds gross. . .like sexual gross!

Quote by Necroheadbanger
Hello.
I'm looking for professional bongo-ists and triangle-ists to make a Progressive Technical Brutal Death Metal band
(will be called AxOxJxLxAxIxVxXxUxWxZxQxUxRxWxGxJxSxAxLxKxMxNxHxUxGxAxAxWxVxCxBxZxVx)
(Don't even ask what it means)


https://soundcloud.com/95dank



#12
Wrong: Stoning gays
Right: Bidets
You are now using UG Black.
You are now using UG Classic.


Listening to: The Police


#wolfie2017 #freegyros #gifsftw G7#9
#13
Quote by Victory2134
To hop on this a bit, in the northeastern bits of the US, everyone's a total asshole. Coming from the south it's a huge shock. Down here it's not okay to be an asshole to other people for no reason.


NJ isn't part of the US.

It's part of hell.


excuse me the northeast us rage is always 100% incredibly justified
#14
Quote by soundgarden1986
excuse me the northeast us rage is always 100% incredibly justified


Yeah Victory, you'd be a douchebag too if you had to live in one of the dumps up there
.
#16
The entire Middle East and all Muslim countries

is it still not cool to acknowledge this or what
My God, it's full of stars!
#17
Quote by Dreadnought
The entire Middle East and all Muslim countries

is it still not cool to acknowledge this or what

they wont even say the name

radical islam!
radical islam!
radical islam!

*spins in bathroom mirror*

but yeh.
#18
I was really hoping people would go "Oh i went to X country on holiday and over there they do X and I thought that's cool" and we'd talk about things that we might be able to do that were positive but

nooooooooo
they're coming to take me away
ha-haaa
#19
Quote by Victory2134
To hop on this a bit, in the northeastern bits of the US, everyone's a total asshole. Coming from the south it's a huge shock. Down here it's not okay to be an asshole to other people for no reason.
it's great isn't it?

Quote by k.lainad
i totally agree with that, the last time i went to Philly, people will flip you off in the street for no reason, cuss you out if you bump into them on the sidewalk (instead of saying excuse me or sorry) or they'll roll down their windows just to call you an idiot if you drive too slow in traffic, etc lol i was surprised really... but i would expect that in NYC tbh.
stop driving slow
___

Quote by The_Blode
she was saying things like... do you want to netflix and chill but just the chill part...too bad she'll never know that I only like the Netflix part...
Last edited by WCPhils at Dec 3, 2016,
#20
Quote by Banjocal
I was really hoping people would go "Oh i went to X country on holiday and over there they do X and I thought that's cool" and we'd talk about things that we might be able to do that were positive but

nooooooooo


To change the tone a bit I went to montreal and they call their bars 'saloons' like they're in some kind of western. What a silly people.
Quote by Hal-Sephira

We all have the rights to be mad

So does you
#21
Quote by Banjocal
I was really hoping people would go "Oh i went to X country on holiday and over there they do X and I thought that's cool" and we'd talk about things that we might be able to do that were positive but

nooooooooo


Okay, you dork:

Drinking culture is much better in Europe than in America, and that was a pleasant surprise
My God, it's full of stars!
#22
tbh drinking culture over here is pretty dire, though not as bad a China if my sources are to be trusted (probably not)
they're coming to take me away
ha-haaa
#23
When I lived in England, I was surprised to meet people who had never left the country or been on a plane. One guy spent his entire life within a 50 mile radius of where he was born.
#24
Yeah we get pretty trapped in. It's part of why I'm desperate to leave. Our countryside is largely flat and lacks "real" greenery (lots of fields)

Whereabouts are you now, Sashki?
they're coming to take me away
ha-haaa
#25
Quote by Banjocal
I was really hoping people would go "Oh i went to X country on holiday and over there they do X and I thought that's cool" and we'd talk about things that we might be able to do that were positive but

nooooooooo
in Japan the tops in the gay couples do the sucking AND the fucking.
#26
Shame I'm a top then I could do with a good working over
Last edited by Banjocal at Dec 4, 2016,
#27
Okay, I'm gonna try and name some without bringing up basic-bitch tourist clichés.

Czech Republic

Their waiters genuinely don't give a shit about you. This is both good and bad. It's good because the more Western way of constantly licking your ass just feels fake and insincere a lot of the time - if I had a nice conversation with a Czech waiter it actually felt like getting along with a real person. It's bad because sometimes you just want to put a few tables together and make more space or some shit and they'll look at you like some pest. I have to say I prefer the way they do it at home but it's not something I couldn't get used to.

I like that they're incredibly chill about drinking beer. I'm sure most of you fruity libtards thoroughly hate the idea of alcohol and whip yourself for getting a bit tipsy off of strawberry cider (I'm being cheeky here don't hate me for it) but drinking seems to be less of a show when it's okay to just have a beer at 10 in the morning and when you see women drinking more beer than you at a pub.

Bosnia, Serbia

People seem to be way more relaxed about everything, things move slower. You'd go to a café in the Baščaršija and wait for like half an hour to be served, even though there were few people sitting there. The waiter would take a bunch of time to bring the coffee, but he genuinely wouldn't care about how long you stay there and there'd be no way in hell he'd bring you the receipt by himself or otherwise imply you need to free up the table. Hell, he might come over and smoke a cig nearby and have some banter with you. When we went to a supermarket in Belgrade there was like a 20 meter long line in front of the only two working cash registers, we waited in line for like 20 minutes. But people didn't care, they were just chilling in line. The cashier was taking her sweet, sweet time with every customer and when we got to her she still talked to us, asking where we're from and stuff, smiling the entire time and being very nice. And we'd get stopped by people in the streets who heard us speak Slovene to welcome us to Serbia.

Syria, Jordan

They were definitely the countries that felt the most foreign to me, but it's hard to put into words why. Of course there's obvious stuff like women being veiled - for instance when we were walking through the market in Damascus a women pushing a cart with her friend tripped and fell and one of the men from our group rushed to her to help her up, but got immediately pushed away and yelled at by her (female) friend. It's strange because you're very aware of the foreign social norms when stuff like that happens, but when you see a woman being so adamant and aggressive towards a man for approaching her it's not entirely natural to perceive her as oppressed, but I suppose at the end you realise that your immediate reaction is one only part of the story.

Another thing is that people seem to be much more personal and in-your-face about stuff. Because I'm blond merchants would approach me and give me various foods and sweets they were selling, for me to try out but they'd also be more insistent on selling them to me after that, especially with naming the price because of the whole bartering thing. In cafés at restaurants you'd get more personal contact like a hand on the shoulder or a handshake when paying for stuff. At some point we were being poured a drink and one of the women from our group reached out her glass first and the waiter was visibly surprised and very hesitant about pouring her the drink until her husband signaled to him that it's okay.

Here I can't be sure how much of this is genuine local culture and how much of it is the attitude towards tourists, because it's really hard not to stick out as foreigners as a group of pale Europeans.


Gozd in gora poj,
silen ženimo hrup,
uboga gmajna, le vpup, le vkup,
le vkup, le vkup z menoj,
staro pravdo v mrak tulimo,
da se pretulimo skozi to zimo
Last edited by JamSessionFreak at Dec 3, 2016,
#28
Quote by Amuro Jay
in Japan the tops in the gay couples do the sucking AND the fucking.


huh

Quote by Pastafarian96
I an evety characyer in this story
#29
Quote by sashki
When I lived in England, I was surprised to meet people who had never left the country or been on a plane. One guy spent his entire life within a 50 mile radius of where he was born.

I've never left the country or been on a plane. I don't get to travel much.
#30
Quote by MeTallIcA313
I've never left the country or been on a plane. I don't get to travel much.

I didn't mean for it to sound disrespectful. Any experience of "cultural shock" says more about the individual than about the culture. As a filthy foreigner, most people in my social circle are similarly foreign and filthy, and that skews my perception of what I consider normal. Now I'm curious as to how common, or uncommon, my perceptions of travel are.
#31
Quote by sashki
I didn't mean for it to sound disrespectful. Any experience of "cultural shock" says more about the individual than about the culture. As a filthy foreigner, most people in my social circle are similarly foreign and filthy, and that skews my perception of what I consider normal. Now I'm curious as to how common, or uncommon, my perceptions of travel are.

I wasn't offended or anything, just wanted to point that out. I can see how that may be different for a foreigner since you may be more used to traveling.

Here in the US though it definitely isn't uncommon for people to never leave the US, since it's a pretty large country.
#33
Quote by Amuro Jay
ikr? it's pretty great, nobody's forced to put a wee that's been up their bum into their mouth.

they've got it figured out, i tell you.


I might trade teams

Quote by Pastafarian96
I an evety characyer in this story
#34
i'm from a small country town you know the old everyone knows everybody blah blah you get it; but I have notice that people in big cities like little rock,dallas, Nashville, cincinnati big cities like that when you make eye contact and say hello to people in big cities they look at you like you got shit on your face I say high to most people in public if I make eye contact with them I'm from the country its what we do we are overly nice but people in the city they are a little different I don't really know where I am going with this just an observation I made I guess seems appropriate
Wise man once said, " If you ever get lost in the woods, just start jacking off someone will see you."
#35
I lived in Taiwan for a bit.

I got given this amazing book about Taiwanese culture that helped me loads when people did things I wasn't expecting. It really helped put the things I do into perspective. Highly recommend getting some culture shock.
#36
Quote by sashki
When I lived in England, I was surprised to meet people who had never left the country or been on a plane. One guy spent his entire life within a 50 mile radius of where he was born.

I think that's a common situation for anyone regardless of country if they can't afford to travel. It's certainly not the case near where I am in the south as there's not much locally that would make a good vacation spot but we have access to cheap package holidays abroad and often staying in England for a holiday would be more expensive. However, for those with easy access to the black mountains/peak district/lake district/south west coast/scotland it can be more cost effective to not leave the country. All depends on international airport access tbh.


I always find how loud the US is a bit of a culture shock. But the biggest was in the Philippines (although things have improved a lot since I last visited), my mum's family only got an indoor bathroom in early 2000s. I found it hard to deal without indoor plumbing and the concept of outdoor bathing. My mum didn't understand why I , as a child, didn't want to use the tin bath out in the garden/yard to have a bath (ie naked and in front of everyone) even though my cousins (also children) did.
Quote by Renka
OddOneOut is an Essex S&M mistress and not a pirate or a computer program.

#37
wrong: islamic treatment of women
right: pita bread
<//\\//\\//\\//\\//\\//\\//\\>
<//\\//\\//\\//\\//\\//\\//\\>
<//\\//\\//\\//\\//\\//\\//\\>
#38
I find how people (in my social circle) in the US don't like to talk about money a bit of a culture shock. I don't even mean like talking about salaries or personal finances, just things like how much their lunch was when I'm trying to decide what to get.


Something I used to find shocking and unacceptable when I was a teenager was how I couldn't go anywhere on my own in India and I couldn't wear what I was used to wearing at home. The main issue was really that i couldn't communicate well in the local language and based on my clothing/behavior it was obvious that I wasn't from there. Now I don't really care because I can talk to everyone and blend in easily so I can actually do things on my own. Yeah, I still can't wear shorts, but why would I want to when it's hot and dusty with loads of mosquitoes everywhere? Being covered up is much better for that area regardless of any social issues pertaining to women's clothing.


Also I was taught never to go barefoot outside in case I stepped on a venomous insect or reptile or glass or whatever. Seeing people barefoot everywhere in Australia and New Zealand is not really shocking or positive or negative but I'm just like hmmm ok
cat
Last edited by guitarxo at Dec 4, 2016,
#39
Quote by guitarxo
I find how people (in my social circle) in the US don't like to talk about money a bit of a culture shock. I don't even mean like talking about salaries or personal finances, just things like how much their lunch was when I'm trying to decide what to get.

in my experience reservations and affluence are correlated

I'll brag at the fact that I can get kimchi fried rice and a quality beer for $7 as lunch

Quote by Pastafarian96
I an evety characyer in this story
Last edited by M00NAGEDAYDREAM at Dec 4, 2016,
#40
Quote by M00NAGEDAYDREAM
in my experience reservations and affluence are correlated


That has also been my experience in the US, but definitely not in other countries.
cat
Page 1 of 3