#1
Okay I'm going to be brutally honest... I like to play guitar while stoned. While I am good enough to play intermediate level solos (Five Finger Death Punch, Pink Floyd, some GNR, etc) sober, I can't hit the fast bits while high. My fingers just don't move as quickly

I'll always get better with practice. But, in the meantime, I'd like to re-write sections of the solo so that I can play them and they flow and sound well.

I know classic rock solos are written in the image of minor pent scales. I'd like some direction on what to focus on and maybe some tips to inspire me to get some momentum going on this.

I've tried just skipping some notes or playing at 2/3 speed and just not finishing the lick, but they don't sound right (obviously). What advice do you have?

For what it matters I play on a Epi LP and 9-46.
#2
You will find better answers here:

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=8


EG is mostly for gear related problems but MT is a little more geared towards theory etc...
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#4
So let me get this straight. You like playing guitar while you're stoned, but you can't play as well, so you have to make the songs easier?

Why?

Scenario #1 - you're getting stoned just for fun and like noodling around on the guitar since you enjoy it, which means I probably wouldn't care too much about playing everything perfectly, I mean, if it's just for shiz and giggles you don't need to absolutely nail those solos 100%.

Scenario #2 - you really need to know how to play those songs because you need to record them or perform them live - in which case I'd say you're acting very unprofessionally and I probably wouldn't want to work with you.

But just to be fair, I'll answer your question anyway. I think what you need is decent skills in improvisation, the art of coming up with solos and melodies on the spot, "out of thin air" if you will. You need to learn about keys - a key determines the tonal center and the diatonic notes of your song. Then, you need to train your ear and your skills in phrasing.

Ear training is obvious, in order to improvise, you need to hear those licks you're about to play in your head before you play them, and then translate them to your instrument. Ear training helps with this a ton. Phrasing is more about knowing what to play and when, you need to know which notes sound good together, and when to play them fast, when slow, and when to throw in a soulful bend. To develop your skills in phrasing, I'd suggest you learn a lot of solos and analyze them to see how the notes are grouped together and how the whole solo is built. In general, the best way to learn how to solo is to learn a lot of solos.

If you still want to go down the road of simply writing new solos in peace, you still need to learn a bit about theory. Keys, as I mentioned, are essential, as your solo needs to be in the right key. Then, you should look into some chord theory, as you should know what notes sound good over certain chords so that your solo sounds like it fits the rhythm section. And to be honest, you write slow guitar solos much in the same way you write melodies, so watching some lessons on writing those should help a lot.

But I'd still say that the best way to learn that is to train your ear and simply learn a lot of guitar solos and analyze them until you really understand what's going on, and if you don't understand some theoretical concept you need to look it up. You don't necessarily need knowledge in theory if you have good ears and a lot of good solos under your fingers.
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#5
Quote by Kevätuhri
So let me get this straight. You like playing guitar while you're stoned, but you can't play as well, so you have to make the songs easier?

Why?

Scenario #1 - you're getting stoned just for fun and like noodling around on the guitar since you enjoy it, which means I probably wouldn't care too much about playing everything perfectly, I mean, if it's just for shiz and giggles you don't need to absolutely nail those solos 100%.

Scenario #2 - you really need to know how to play those songs because you need to record them or perform them live - in which case I'd say you're acting very unprofessionally and I probably wouldn't want to work with you.


Well you're right, I don't need to nail them, but I would enjoy my experience more if I was able to play fluidly rather than stumble on the strings just for the sake of maintaining the difficulty. It just comes down to preference. Personally, even if there's just a difficult three second lick of relatively easy 30 second solo, it's pretty distracting if I screw it up. That's like saying to a an artist "if you're not selling this particular piece of art, why do you care if you mess up?"

I'm not exactly certain what you're suggesting with scenario two, but whatever it is it's not the case lol. My only audience is my girlfriend in the other room and my dog who just wishes my amp would spontaneously combust.

Quote by Kevätuhri
But just to be fair, I'll answer your question anyway. I think what you need is decent skills in improvisation, the art of coming up with solos and melodies on the spot, "out of thin air" if you will. You need to learn about keys - a key determines the tonal center and the diatonic notes of your song. Then, you need to train your ear and your skills in phrasing.

Ear training is obvious, in order to improvise, you need to hear those licks you're about to play in your head before you play them, and then translate them to your instrument. Ear training helps with this a ton. Phrasing is more about knowing what to play and when, you need to know which notes sound good together, and when to play them fast, when slow, and when to throw in a soulful bend. To develop your skills in phrasing, I'd suggest you learn a lot of solos and analyze them to see how the notes are grouped together and how the whole solo is built. In general, the best way to learn how to solo is to learn a lot of solos.

If you still want to go down the road of simply writing new solos in peace, you still need to learn a bit about theory. Keys, as I mentioned, are essential, as your solo needs to be in the right key. Then, you should look into some chord theory, as you should know what notes sound good over certain chords so that your solo sounds like it fits the rhythm section. And to be honest, you write slow guitar solos much in the same way you write melodies, so watching some lessons on writing those should help a lot.

But I'd still say that the best way to learn that is to train your ear and simply learn a lot of guitar solos and analyze them until you really understand what's going on, and if you don't understand some theoretical concept you need to look it up. You don't necessarily need knowledge in theory if you have good ears and a lot of good solos under your fingers.


Okay, I think I knew that already, but I needed to hear someone say it. I've always been one of those "pick up your brother's guitar and sit in your closet for 4 weeks until you hit the song note for note and then move on to the next song" rather than deliberately learning theory and the purpose behind what I'm playing. Although, I played piano for a few years so I know the basics of theory. But, anyone who plays multiple instruments knows that there is little musical carryover, unless it is applied appropriately.

Kevätuhri, just out of curiosity, what was your most valuable tool or experience (be specific) in really getting comfortable with the aforementioned?
#7
Quote by sojiasx
Well you're right, I don't need to nail them, but I would enjoy my experience more if I was able to play fluidly rather than stumble on the strings just for the sake of maintaining the difficulty. It just comes down to preference. Personally, even if there's just a difficult three second lick of relatively easy 30 second solo, it's pretty distracting if I screw it up. That's like saying to a an artist "if you're not selling this particular piece of art, why do you care if you mess up?"


Well, if the artist was tripping balls I really don't think he/she should care If you're making a piece of art and you know that doing drugs cripples your ability, I guess you shouldn't expect too much. I just think it's silly that you'd rather make a solo easier than practice or play sober.

Quote by sojiasx


I'm not exactly certain what you're suggesting with scenario two, but whatever it is it's not the case lol. My only audience is my girlfriend in the other room and my dog who just wishes my amp would spontaneously combust.


I was just making sure that you're not practicing these songs for an actual serious job, in which case the solution would have been to stop smoking pot.

Quote by sojiasx
But, anyone who plays multiple instruments knows that there is little musical carryover, unless it is applied appropriately.



I'd say there isn't much technical carryover, but there's definitely musical. I don't play piano, but I could still come up with nice melodies on one because I know how they sound. Just as I can play drums a bit since I have a good grasp on rhythm. There is no piano specific or guitar specific theory, if you learned theory on the piano you can use the same knowledge on guitar.

Quote by sojiasx


Kevätuhri, just out of curiosity, what was your most valuable tool or experience (be specific) in really getting comfortable with the aforementioned?


I'd say it's listening and learning. In my opinion, listening to a lot of music and learning a lot of music is much more valuable than theoretical knowledge or even technical practice. In the end of the day, you write music with your ears, and you develop your ears by listening to music (and learning songs by ear) so I'd say that is what you should focus on.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#8
Quote by Kevätuhri
Well, if the artist was tripping balls I really don't think he/she should care If you're making a piece of art and you know that doing drugs cripples your ability, I guess you shouldn't expect too much. I just think it's silly that you'd rather make a solo easier than practice or play sober.


Well, I do practice, and I do play sober... just not all the time. Think of it less as trying to make the solo easier, and more of experimenting and expanding my skills by trying something new. After all, it's not like I'm asking people to write tabs for me in an easier version.


Quote by Kevätuhri
I was just making sure that you're not practicing these songs for an actual serious job, in which case the solution would have been to stop smoking pot.


It's no secret some of the best artists were heavy drug users. Isn't it a commonly known fact to not smoke before playing live? I can't be the only one who plays in slow motion :P. Also, isn't that the point of musicians playing cover songs? Because they're easier? Consider this as a musician who plays live: to be able to cover (note-for-note) a good amount (maybe 50-60) of conventional "crowd pleaser" songs... you know, like Boston, Aerosmith, and the stuff every bar goer knows... you'd need many thousands of hours of practice. Don't they take them one notch down so they're more manageable? and even if they did play them precisely as the album is, forget about adding songs to your repertoire at any appreciable rate. Maybe one or two per month if you're lucky. Either way, that's not me, and I'm just getting too philosophical now :P.

Thanks for the advice anyway man, I've already started messing around with some Am and Em jam tracks and the scales.