#1
So, I know there's a lot of info about this theme in particular and I want to know what do you think about it... is it mandatory to have your thumb finger in the middle of the neck, or do you put it over the neck from time to time?

for me, as I play in a hardcore punk band, sometimes I place my thumb over the E chord, and even sometimes [specially when I have to do a pull off on the E string from 5th to 3rd fret] y place my thumb over the middle of the neck. I know this isn't supposed to be 'the way' but is the only way my wrist wont hurt [if I try to do the pull off I mention before with my thumb placed in the middle of the neck my hand would be like 70-80 degrees and it'll begin to hurt in a really short time].

I know this isn't a black/white thread and everybody may have an opnion, and that's what I want to hear from you.

Thanks in advance.
#2
I'd like some insight on this too. I move my thumb based on where I'm fretting but it feels like its getting in the way lots of the time.
#3
Thumb on the back of the neck at all times. Yes, a lot of things in music are personal preference, but there is absolutely a correct way of doing things when it comes to technique, Your thumb is there as a support to allow you to fret notes properly. It gives you something to press against. Yes, your palm can do that as well, but nowhere near as efficiently - remember back to physics. Smaller area with same force equals more pressure.

Additionally, try this. Hold your neck with your thumb over the top. Try and move your fingers, stretch them across frets etc whilst keeping that thumb position. Now try the same movements with the thumb on the back of the neck. Much more freedom. Additionally, with having the thumb on the back of the neck, you should have a gap between your hand and the bottom edge of the fretboard. Less contact is less friction, allowing you to move your hand around the neck easier. There are only benefits to thumb on the back of the neck aka proper technique,
#4
Yes, the "baseball bat" grip makes no sense on the bass and only hinders you in my opinion, completely agree with DB. On the guitar it's more subjective, but on the bass I'd just call it bad technique.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#5
I agree with both of you... after seeing some videos I found out I was making a mistake since I was using the top part of my finger as support instead of my "fingerprint area", this is really hard for me to explain since english is not my mother tongue. I guess bending my thumb finger was a great mistake for me, but now I understand the benefits of "thumb on the back of the neck all time". I'm still using extra force sometimes but I guess I'll be over it in some time.
#6
Most of you are under 40, so you don't give much thought (well except Ben) about how good technique early on makes a huge difference physically when you play as an older bass player. Not using your thumb as a pivot will lead to major aches and pains in your fretting hand later on, esp. if your hands are smaller. It also cuts down on your speed because as Ben has explained beautifully above, physics will fight for or against you, especially when your muscles and tendons are older. If I slip back into "guitar grip" in playing, I can't play as long and yes, I feel the strain in my hand now more than ever.
#7
Quote by Deliriumbassist
Thumb on the back of the neck at all times. Yes, a lot of things in music are personal preference, but there is absolutely a correct way of doing things when it comes to technique, Your thumb is there as a support to allow you to fret notes properly. It gives you something to press against. Yes, your palm can do that as well, but nowhere near as efficiently - remember back to physics. Smaller area with same force equals more pressure.

Additionally, try this. Hold your neck with your thumb over the top. Try and move your fingers, stretch them across frets etc whilst keeping that thumb position. Now try the same movements with the thumb on the back of the neck. Much more freedom. Additionally, with having the thumb on the back of the neck, you should have a gap between your hand and the bottom edge of the fretboard. Less contact is less friction, allowing you to move your hand around the neck easier. There are only benefits to thumb on the back of the neck aka proper technique,
All of this^ When I focused on getting this technique right, I became a much better player. I still see a ton of people who place their thumb over the fretboard and it makes me cringe everytime.