#1
my birthday is in two days, and i have been obsessed with drums. it's not just interested. i 'borrowed' my school's drumsticks, and practice almost everyday. i am serious in getting a kit and practicing.

but my parents wont buy the whole thing, so what are the most important things i need for punk hardcore and metal drumming?

i narrowed it down to:

snare drum
kick/bass (not sure what is the correct name)
hi hat
crash

tell me if i might need anything else. i can't buy the whole thing though, only a few cheap versions of the above

thanks

#2
Invest in good quality cymbals.. Sabian or Zildjian, Meinl (get middle level NOT the entry level ones).. good quality snare.

I bought USED but good condition cymbals and polished them.. I won't be able to give suggestion on the bass drum thou.. if you search.. I own a Cajon kit (complete) - https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1708931
My Zildjian 14" New Beats Hi-hat Cymbal are warm and bright and 16" Medium Crash compliments my hi-hats.
I have Washburn guitars 'Maverick Series' and bass 'Bantam Series' and a few pedals and amps, but man I wish to have more patience and drive practicing my playing, if it's equal to the modding itch, then I'm golden.
#3
psp742 is it worth buying from pawn shops? or do you recommend best quality stuff from stores for a beginner.

im ok learning with bad equipment, i can adapt, but i just don't know what is a bad cymbal or not
#4
Generally speaking, I Google search what are the most recommended brands and model cymbals that are good quality and durable too. Everyone has there own expectation or tone they like.. I like 80's genre rock and stuff.. aside from cymbal, snare and bass drum.. you need good quality toms.. also durable hardware stand is a must.

There are more knowledgeable drummers that would give you suggestions.. but it is more a matter of personal taste and tone that your ears would like. If you can afford brand new... by all means do it.. if you have a budget to stick to stay away from unknown brands.. you want equipment that grows with you. Avoid the budget kits offered.. usually they are so-so.. I'm not suggesting buy the most expensive cymbal but get good quality.. Sabian B8 PRO are good.. Zildjian New Beats Hi-hat Cymbal (they are heavy 80's but the tone is smooth and crisp) might not be what others like but it is what sounds good to my ears.. they are on the heavy side. If you know someone who plays drum.. ask them personally what they would want for their own kit. What sound they prefer and why.. music is personal expression of one's soul.. if you have a favorite instrumentalists.. read up on what gear they used and try to follow their growth in the industry.. they started playing in high school and band in the garage.
I have Washburn guitars 'Maverick Series' and bass 'Bantam Series' and a few pedals and amps, but man I wish to have more patience and drive practicing my playing, if it's equal to the modding itch, then I'm golden.
#5
>>do you recommend best quality stuff from stores for a beginner<<

Folks will argue this point (and not without merit) but for a beginner "technique" is more important than the quality of the instrument. When I was a young boy we still had music classes in elementary school and I wanted very badly to play the drums. Having absolutely zero natural talent they started me out on a block of wood covered with a rubber pad and I was doing okay and looking forward to getting behind a real kit. But they insisted I also learn to read music at the same time and that killed it for me. I just couldn't wrap my head around that (I was too impatient) as a young teen.

That being said I think it's important to make real noise and play songs you like as soon as possible. Have you looked at electronic drum kits? For the same money spent on a good partial kit you could get into any of the entry level electronic kits. The weak link with electronic kits is the electronics (in the form of pads cutting out or quitting altogether) so do your research and look for something with a good warranty. Also because you can use head phones when you practice it will go a long way to keeping your parents supportive of your playing.

Here are some entry level kits you might find at your local Guitar Center. I would have killed for something like these when I was first starting out. Think of them as rubber covered wooden drum blocks on steroids!

No matter what - keep in mind with music the beginning is best, and the rest is just practice! So have fun!



:-)