#2
This is why you check to make sure things fit before you buy anything.

Why not just keep the current set of tuners? The stock ones are probably perfectly fine.

I know that Grover locking tuners have longer posts, but they might actually be too long for what you want. They're comically long. Measure the stock tuners and compare them to the technical drawings for the replacement tuners. They're always attached to online retail listings whenever you buy replacement tuners to prevent this very predicament you're now in.

I myself am a big fan of Gotoh. They're well priced, tightly toleranced and very, very smooth. The only reason I bought Grover Keystones for my Gibson V over Gotohs is because Grovers are the standard die casts for Gibsons and therefore look more appropriate. I changed them from the Klusons purely for aesthetics.
Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend
#3
Not sure which country manufactures Grover tuners but I seem to like their tuners.. Schaller Locking tuners are also one of my top choice for tuners.
I have Washburn guitars 'Maverick Series' and bass 'Bantam Series' and a few pedals and amps, but man I wish to have more patience and drive practicing my playing, if it's equal to the modding itch, then I'm golden.
#4
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
This is why you check to make sure things fit before you buy anything.

Why not just keep the current set of tuners? The stock ones are probably perfectly fine.

I know that Grover locking tuners have longer posts, but they might actually be too long for what you want. They're comically long. Measure the stock tuners and compare them to the technical drawings for the replacement tuners. They're always attached to online retail listings whenever you buy replacement tuners to prevent this very predicament you're now in.

I myself am a big fan of Gotoh. They're well priced, tightly toleranced and very, very smooth. The only reason I bought Grover Keystones for my Gibson V over Gotohs is because Grovers are the standard die casts for Gibsons and therefore look more appropriate. I changed them from the Klusons purely for aesthetics.

Thomann do free returns
It's not something I particularly imagined being an issue, but I did forsee other issues so I wouldn't have ordered if I couldn't just return them.
It's quite likely the current tuners themselves are fine but I'm unbelievably terrible at stringing guitars so that is probably contributing to the awful tuning issues I have on this guitar. I'm aware I'll probably need to do something to the nut as well.
I'll check out the Grovers, thanks. Comically long sounds about right.
Alternatively does anybody make 3 a side slot style tuners?
#5
Yes, all companies make 6 inline tuners or 3x3 tuners.. if you intend to replace the original oem tuners.. I suggest measuring the location of screw holes and buying tuners that are direct drop in.. that way you don't need to drill holes.
I have Washburn guitars 'Maverick Series' and bass 'Bantam Series' and a few pedals and amps, but man I wish to have more patience and drive practicing my playing, if it's equal to the modding itch, then I'm golden.
#6
Quote by korinaflyingv
Thomann do free returns

Not if you live outside of Germany.

But if you do just so happen to, fair enough.
It's quite likely the current tuners themselves are fine but I'm unbelievably terrible at stringing guitars so that is probably contributing to the awful tuning issues I have on this guitar. I'm aware I'll probably need to do something to the nut as well.

It may have been best to resolve those problems first before getting new tuners.
I'll check out the Grovers, thanks. Comically long sounds about right.
Alternatively does anybody make 3 a side slot style tuners?

The Grovers are great tuners, but I think the posts being that long looks really dumb and it actually significantly reduces the break angle over the nut.


Please measure your old tuners and compare them to the technical drawings before buying anything.

When you mean '3 a side slot tuners' are you referring to the 3-on-a-plate tuners like you find on older guitars?



Because if you are, then these will not fit your guitar. All of that style use the vintage-style tuner posts that use press-fit inserts that will not fit a modern guitar. The holes in the headstock will be too large. You can buy conversion bushings from Stewmac to resolve this, but all of this assumes that the location of the holes on each side of the headstock match exactly with the tuners. With an LTD, I don't think they would've intended for this style of tuners to ever be used on their guitars, so I doubt they would ever fit.
Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend
#7
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Not if you live outside of Germany.

I live in the UK and I'm getting a free return. They may have recently changed their policy.
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
It may have been best to resolve those problems first before getting new tuners.

Probably.
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
The Grovers are great tuners, but I think the posts being that long looks really dumb and it actually significantly reduces the break angle over the nut.

That looks about the right length overall but I don't think they'd fit, the bit that sits in the whole in the headstock is too short.

And no, I meant like the tuners you get on an old tele.
#8
Quote by korinaflyingv

That looks about the right length overall but I don't think they'd fit, the bit that sits in the whole in the headstock is too short.


The bit that sits in the hole is supposed to be short, otherwise the threaded bushing would never clamp on the headstock. As long as the string post is above the wood and below the nut slots, you're okay.

Edit: Do you have any pictures of an M6 installed in the guitar?
Last edited by -MintSauce- at Dec 10, 2016,