#1
Hello everyone , I've had this thing in the back of my head and I came to realize that ever since I bought my ESP E-II NTB not even once did I use the tremolo system that the Floyd rose original had to offer for me, and I also don't see myself using it anytime soon in the future . Though one thing I would say , I love my guitar , it plays beautifully and the day I picked it up and switched from a cheap Ltd to a real ESP deal I fell in love with how it felt. So what advice do I need? I've been thinking about blocking my tremolo system since I often find myself wanting to change tunings to play different sorts of things though I like things clean and neat and it seems that blocking it with a piece of wood like everyone do it has some cons .. which I'm not even sure about , I just read about it online and then I looked into Tremol-No and thought that'd be a good idea.. but I'm not sure which one of the which if any of them at all, some people would say it's useless to keep my guitar cause I don't use my tremolo so why not get a hard tail.. well tbh I've also considered moving to 7 strings so if I could find a 7 string hard tail that plays as good I'd love it.. though it's gonna have to be a solid deal since I'd get around 1300$ or so for my M-II second if I sell it and idk if I could find a guitar that feels as good for that much money.. so should I just not even consider selling it? Is blocking the tremolo with a piece of wood or the Tremol-No system a better idea or does it have annoying flaws?

Thank you in advance for your advice everyone
#2
A properly set up tremolo bridge w/a block should be rather stable tuning wise, possibly more so than a hard tail (for locking trems). Hard tails/non tremolo bridges will make it easier to switch tunings, but you will still need to set up the guitar properly for the tuning you want to use, and this includes ensuring that the nut slots are properly cut, especially if you go up in string gauges (Not having to worry about the nut slots is one advantage that locking trem guitars do have over hard tails for setups). It may be true that if you don't use the trem, you might be better off just going with a hard tail, but you never know when the urge might strike to have a guitar with one again. I mostly play hard-tail guitars, but still like to have a tremolo equipped guitar or two on hand.

The one thing you really need to keep in mind though, is that no 7 string is going to play and feel exactly like your E-II. There's no getting around the fact that you will have a wider neck/fretboard, and an extra string to work with if you go w/a 7.
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#3
For me I'd start with the inexpensive option and see if that does what I want. The wood trick is pretty inexpensive assuming you have some wood and tools.

If not, try the tremol-no and see if that works. I know some guys that like the Floyd just for the fast fine tuning and keep it blocked off.

If you like your current guitar that much I wouldn't sell it to fund another guitar variant you don't know if you will like. I can see major regret here if the 7 doesn't work out.
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#4
Okay so you guys mentioned that even on a hardtail you need to do some adjustments in order to change tuning and make it work well.. but I have songs i play on standrad tuning or drop D and some that i like playing on drop C.. in that type of situation.. what do i do.. even if i block the tremolo off , if my guitar was set up on Standard tuning im assuming there'll be problems with playing it when it's dropped to C ? or am i mistaken? what are the adjustments and flaws i'd feel if i played it on drop C then?
#5
Quote by guy123172
Okay so you guys mentioned that even on a hardtail you need to do some adjustments in order to change tuning and make it work well.. but I have songs i play on standrad tuning or drop D and some that i like playing on drop C.. in that type of situation.. what do i do.. even if i block the tremolo off , if my guitar was set up on Standard tuning im assuming there'll be problems with playing it when it's dropped to C ? or am i mistaken? what are the adjustments and flaws i'd feel if i played it on drop C then?

You'll need to change string gauge, adjust the action, the truss rod and the intonation if you're going to jump from E standard to drop C. Pretty much everything you can adjust on the guitar may need to be adjusted.

You may also need to widen some of the nut slots to accommodate the heavier gauge.

This is why people who play multiple tunings tend to own multiple guitars.
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#6
Quote by guy123172
Okay so you guys mentioned that even on a hardtail you need to do some adjustments in order to change tuning and make it work well.. but I have songs i play on standrad tuning or drop D and some that i like playing on drop C.. in that type of situation.. what do i do.. even if i block the tremolo off , if my guitar was set up on Standard tuning im assuming there'll be problems with playing it when it's dropped to C ? or am i mistaken? what are the adjustments and flaws i'd feel if i played it on drop C then?
The best thing to do is to have the guitar set up for the exact tuning you plan on using it in. Many people have multiple guitars for multiple tunings, but this isn't always an option for everyone.

There's a little bit more wiggle room, however, when switching between a standard tuning, and the nearest drop tuning (i.e, E standard to drop D, or D standard down to drop C, etc.). The set-up will not be exact, but it will be close, and I dare say you can get away with it on some guitars. It's going from something like E standard, to drop C where you will definitely have setup issues. It's also easier to do this w/a hardtail than a floyd/locking trem (It depends on how much travel your fine tuners have for the bottom string).
- Gibson Flying V 120 #1 (White)
- Gibson Flying V 120 #2 (Cherry)
- Gibson SG Standard ('61 style)
- Jackson DK2M

- ENGL Fireball 60
- Avatar 4x12

- Many pedals, plus other stuff
#7
first of all I understand it better now thanks to your replies , so thanks a lot for that.
I believe it's useless for me to even bother blocking my tremolo off tbh if that is the case.
I do have a few more questions that i'd love to get some more help around with ,
I do know that 7 string guitars are different and will definitely not feel anywhere close to my guitar. although I'm sure i can somewhere find a good enough 7 string that'll feel just as nice in my hands. and considering i'd go around shops and look for the right 7 string for me , do you guys have some tips to help me figure out the whole 7 string idea? some people say a 7 string is a complete different approach whereas others say it's a 6 string with a handy extra low string. what approach should i be taking when i go to a store and pick up a 7 string for the first time? do i try to play my ordinary stuff first just like i would on a 6 and see how it feels and then play around a little with the 7th string to see how that feels as well? or are there some measures i should take?
I'd love to get some more information about the subject and about the whole transformation from a 6 to a 7 if you guys could help me i'd be grateful.

Thanks again in advance to all of you and thank you everyone who had already helped me!
#8
Quote by guy123172
some people say a 7 string is a complete different approach whereas others say it's a 6 string with a handy extra low string. what approach should i be taking when i go to a store and pick up a 7 string for the first time?

Playing one and seeing if you like it.
Roses are red
Violets are blue
Omae wa mou
Shindeiru



Quote by Axelfox
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#9
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Playing one and seeing if you like it.


And considering I don't really have a use of the 7th string YET since i never really experienced with it and my only reference is other people's playing and getting those nice low notes in the right places.. and I personally don't have that , it's something i'd have to develop within time of course , i'd just go to the store and play a 7 string as a 6 and if i like it i buy it and start figuring that 7th string at home i guess?

Anyone who had that in mind when they moved to a 7 string?
#10
Quote by guy123172
And considering I don't really have a use of the 7th string YET since i never really experienced with it and my only reference is other people's playing and getting those nice low notes in the right places.. and I personally don't have that , it's something i'd have to develop within time of course , i'd just go to the store and play a 7 string as a 6 and if i like it i buy it and start figuring that 7th string at home i guess?

Anyone who had that in mind when they moved to a 7 string?

Again, the only way you'll know what to do is playing one and see if you like it. The so-called 'approach' to take a 7 string is something that just came naturally to me when I first started playing them. There's no pretentious philosophy that some internet whizzdumb told you required to play them over a 6 string.

To be honest, it seems like you're buying one on pure impulse given you've mentioned you don't actually have a purpose to owning one 'yet'. If playing in B tuning is not something you'll do often, it's probably not worth getting one.
Roses are red
Violets are blue
Omae wa mou
Shindeiru



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#11
I'd simply just block it.
Some see the glass half full, others see the glass half empty. Me? I see that the glass is refillable.
#12
T00DEEPBLUE

It is kind of true , I don't have anything i'm thinking of in advance , my idea was expanding my range by getting a 7 string , try to start playing some bands that use those kinds of guitars and lower tunings .. that was the idea of it basically.
#13
I never understood the fascination with tremolos and Floyd Rose bridges. But I'm a rhythm guitarist so what do I know.
Anyway, you should be fine dropping the lowest string without doing any other setup. But if you are tuning down the entire guitar, say from E standard to D standard, you'll want different strings, and with that comes adjusting the action, probably the truss rod, possibly the nut slots, etc.
My setup: one guitar each for E standard, D standard, and C standard, with a relatively thick gauged string on the bottom for down-tuning. I've had to mix and match strings from different gauge packs in the past to get the exact tensions that I want.

EDIT: Referring to hard-tailed guitars of course, if you decide to get one.
#14
i bought my first seven with no experience playing one. i hated the damn thing. i haven't bought one since, and probably won't. but every once in a while i will pick one up at a store wanting to like it, and i hate it.

that is just me.

multiple guitars are what i do fir different tunings.
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nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


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